Egg-Eating Chickens- How to Break the Habit

It may come as a surprise to learn that chickens will eat eggs out of the nest boxes, but who can blame them? They’re fresh, tasty and nutritious. However, egg-eating is a habit that should be discouraged as soon as possible after discovery. Not only does it reduce the number of eggs available for collection, it is also a habit that is quickly learned by other flock members.
It may come as a surprise to learn that chickens will eat eggs out of the nest boxes, but who can blame them? They’re fresh, tasty and nutritious. However, egg-eating is a habit that should be discouraged as soon as possible after discovery. Not only does it reduce the number of eggs available for collection, it is also a habit that is quickly learned by other flock members.
Many sources recommend culling (aka: physically removing or
killing) an egg eating chicken from the flock, but I do not believe that culling an egg-eater is
necessary. While it is a difficult habit to break, is
not impossible to overcome with some easily implemented strategies.
Many sources recommend culling (aka: physically removing or killing) an egg eating chicken from the flock, but I do not believe that culling an egg-eater is necessary. While it is a difficult habit to break, is not impossible to overcome with some easily implemented strategies.
EGG-EATING THEORIES
  • Innocent exploration of a broken egg in the nest box. Reasons for broken eggs in nest boxes range from the presence of too few nest boxes, more than one hen jockeying for position in a nest box, bored chickens and broody hens intimidating laying hens and monopolizing the nests.
nnocent exploration of a broken egg in the nest box. Reasons for broken eggs in nest boxes range from the presence of too few nest boxes, more than one hen jockeying for position in a nest box, bored chickens and broody hens intimidating laying hens and monopolizing the nests.
  • Improper diet (wrong feed or too many treats/scraps, not offering oyster shell in a separate hopper, etc.) can result in a lack of protein, Vitamin D or calcium deficiency, leading chickens to seek out alternate sources of nutrition.
  • Stress from being disturbed or startled in the nest box can cause breakage, creating a curiosity and the opportunity for the habit to begin.
  • Exposed or brightly lit nest boxes may lead to nervousness and picking at eggs. Hens prefer dark, private locations for egg-laying.
  • Thirsty hens may eat eggs for the liquid. (I think this theory is a stretch, but…it’s possible.)
Thirsty hens may eat eggs for the liquid. (I think this theory is a stretch, but...it's possible.)
IDENTIFYING THE CULPRITS
  • The coop should be check for possible security. Predators such as rats, weasels and snakes are known egg thieves; even the smallest of holes in hardware cloth can allow an egg-eater access to the goods. If no egg thieves are identified, missing eggs are likely due to a flock member.
  • Take note of activity around the nest boxes during peak egg-laying times; egg-eaters can be found loitering around them, looking for their next snack.
  • Egg-eating is messy business; egg-eaters can usually be found with egg yolk on their beaks, faces or feathers.
Egg yolk on feathers is a tip-off.
Egg yolk on feathers is a tip-off.
Tell-tale, beak-shaped hole in egg is a clue that chickens are eating eggs from the nest boxes.
Tell-tale, beak-shaped hole in egg is a clue that chickens are eating eggs from the nest boxes.
Egg yolk on beak is a dead giveaway.
Egg yolk on beak is a dead giveaway.
Evidence that there is an egg eater is obvious when inspecting the nest boxes as there will be egg residue at the bottom. I use Kuhl nest box pads and nest liners for several reasons, one of which is for ease of cleaning the nest boxes and identifying egg-eating chickens.
Evidence that there is an egg eater is obvious when inspecting the nest boxes as there will be egg residue at the bottom. I use plastic nest pads and liners for several reasons, including for ease of cleaning the nest boxes and identifying egg-eating chickens.
Another way to ferret out egg-eating chickens is to watch what they do when given access to the day's egg collection.
 PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION

  •  Collect
    eggs frequently. If eggs aren’t in the nest box, they can’t be eaten.
  • Provide
    at least one, 12”x 12” nest box for every four hens.
  • Break
    broody hens
     that are not sitting on hatching eggs to free-up nest
    box space.
Broken eggs can occur when chickens compete for nest boxes. Broken eggs can then lead to a tasting and then an egg-eating epidemic in the flock.

  • Move broody
    hens
     sitting on hatching eggs to a separate location, away from
    laying hens to free up nest box space and avoid developing embryos
    becoming someone’s lunch.
  • Ensure
    adequate nest box material, which will reduce the likelihood of eggs
    cracking on the hard floor. Plastic nest pads
    are much better choices than pine shavings or straw. Employ roll-out nests, which roll eggs out of the nest when laid, removing any
    temptation or opportunity.
  • Provide
    layer feed for laying hens and limit treats in
    order to avoid nutritional deficiencies.
  • Supply
    oyster shell with or without crushed eggshells in a separate dish to strengthen
    eggshells of all layers, to meet the calcium needs of the egg-eater in
    particular and reduce the probability of weak-shelled eggs breaking
    accidentally.
  • Allow
    hens to work, undisturbed in the morning, keeping busy children and other
    noises away from the hen house to minimize stress and nervous picking.
Hang nest box curtains for laying privacy to increase privacy, reduce stress and hide eggs from snack-seekers.
  • Hang nest
    box curtains
     for laying privacy to increase privacy, reduce
    stress and hide eggs from snack-seekers.
  • Place
    decoy eggs in nest boxes on the theory that pecking at an unyielding ‘egg’
    will deter such conduct in the future. Decoy eggs can be ceramic eggs, golf balls,
    wooden eggs, plastic eggs, etc.
  • Fill blown
    eggs
     with mustard and seal with a dab of paraffin. The hope is
    that the unpleasant flavor of the unexpected contents will deter future
    egg-eating. (Not a super effective method because chickens have very few taste buds.)
  • Ensure access
    to clean, fresh drinking water
     at all times.
  • Install
    roll-out nest boxes, which allow the egg to roll down an incline, away
    from the hen, as soon as it is laid.
Provide confined flocks with boredom-busting activities to prevent egg-eating.

My personal last resort is to segregate the egg-eater daily until the rest of the flock has finished laying eggs for the day. Worst case scenario, they eat their own eggs, but not anyone else’s. Egg-eating need not be cause for culling a chicken from a backyard flock. With some minor coop revisions and changes in routine, even the most avid egg connoisseur can be rehabilitated.

Eggs in nest boxes should be collected frequently to eliminate the opportunity for chickens to eat eggs.

Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

Comments

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Shannon Cox
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Great Information! Thanks as always Kathy!!

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