Jan 21, 2015

Fascinating Facts about Eggs with an Egg-Laying VIDEO!

If you have never witnessed a hen laying an egg, it's your lucky day! I find the entire process of egg production is fascinating and thought you might like to know some fascinating facts about the mighty egg!
If you have never witnessed a hen laying an egg, it's your lucky day! I find the entire process of egg production is fascinating and thought you might like to know some fascinating facts about the mighty egg!
If you have never witnessed a hen laying an egg, it's your lucky day! I find the entire process of egg production is fascinating and thought you might like to know some fascinating facts about the mighty egg!
*ADVISORY: Video contains graphic anatomical images of hen laying an egg.
Viewer discretion is advised.
FASCINATING FACTS ABOUT EGGS
A hen does not need a rooster to produce an egg. That's not really a fascinating fact, it's just something I had to get off my chest. ☺
A hen does not need a rooster to produce an egg.
A hen must mate with a rooster in order for her egg to contain both the male and female genetic material necessary to create an embryo inside the egg. An infertile egg contains only the hen's genetic material, which means a chick can never hatch from that egg. Much more about fertile and infertile eggs in this article.
A hen must mate with a rooster in order for her egg to contain both the male and female genetic material necessary to create an embryo inside the egg. An infertile egg contains only the hen's genetic material, which means a chick can never hatch from that egg.
When a female baby chick hatches, she possesses all the egg yolks (ova) she will ever have. She could never run out of egg yolks even if she laid one egg each day of her life.
A baby chick hatches, she possesses all the egg yolks (ova) she will ever have. She could never run out of egg yolks even if she laid one egg each day of her life.
This is the ovary of a hen, showing ova (yolks) in various stages of development during a post mortem exam.
This is the ovary of a hen, showing ova (yolks) in various stages of development during a post mortem exam.
It takes, on average, 25 hours for a hen to make an egg from the time the yolk is released from her only ovary to the time it is laid. 
A well cared for hen can continue to lay eggs for 10 years or more, although never at the same rate as during her first two years of production.
A well cared for hen can continue to lay eggs for 10-20 years, although never at the same rate as during her first two years of production.
Lighting conditions influence egg production. A hen senses light through the pineal gland near its eyes, which triggers a hormone flow to begin the egg-production process. In autumn and winter, when daylight hours are shorter in many parts of the world, egg production can be stimulated by adding light to the hen house several hours before dawn for a maximum of 16 hours of light total per day. There are no harmful long-term or short-term effects to the hen in providing supplemental light. Hens do not need a break from egg-laying, they will not run out of eggs and they will not molt late when supplemental light is added to the coop properly.
There are no harmful long-term or short-term effects to the hen in providing supplemental light. Hens do not need a break from egg-laying, they will not run out of eggs and they will not molt late when supplemental light is added to the coop properly.
Scientists have proven that a hen does not need to see light with its eyes, it senses light with its pineal gland. They know this from working with blind hens who continue to lay eggs in response to varied lighting conditions.
Scientists have proven that a hen does not need to see light with its eyes, it senses light with its pineal gland. They know this from working with blind hens who continue to lay eggs in response to varied lighting conditions.
Hard-cooked, fresh eggs are harder to peel than older eggs. As an egg ages, the air cell at the end of the egg gets bigger. As the air cell gets bigger, the membrane surrounding the inside of the egg gets farther away from the shell, making it easier to peel than a fresher egg. Learn the no-additive trick to peeling fresh eggs on my blog here.
Hard-cooked, fresh eggs are harder to peel than older eggs. As an egg ages, the air cell at the end of the egg gets bigger. As the air cell gets bigger, the membrane surrounding the inside of the egg gets farther away from the shell, making it easier to peel than a fresher egg. Learn the no-additive trick to peeling fresh eggs on my blog here.
One form of Salmonella, Salmonella Enteritidis, can live inside the ovaries of healthy-looking hens and contaminate an egg before the egg is laid. Chicks given probiotics from the time they hatch are much less likely to contract Salmonella Enteritidis than those that are not.
One form of Salmonella, Salmonella Enteritidis, can live inside the ovaries of healthy-looking hens and contaminate an egg before the egg is laid. Chicks given probiotics from the time they hatch are much less likely to contract Salmonella Enteritidis than those that are not.
Frozen eggs found in a nest box during very cold weather may or may not be safe to eat. Cracked eggs can allow contaminants to enter, making it unsafe to eat. My policy is: when in doubt, throw it out. Click on this link for much more about frozen egg food safety and how to prevent frozen eggs.
Frozen eggs found in a nest box during very cold weather may or may not be safe to eat. Cracked eggs can allow contaminants to enter, making it unsafe to eat. My policy is: when in doubt, throw it out.
The color of an egg is determined by the hen’s breed/genetics. Eggs can be white, brown, blue or any combination of those colors.
The color of an egg is determined by the hen’s breed/genetics. Eggs can be white, brown, blue or any combination of those colors.
The last stop on a hen’s reproductive tract is the uterus, also known as the shell gland. All egg shells are originally white. Colored eggs get their color in the uterus is where an egg gets its color.
Blue eggshells are produced by the pigment oocyanin, a by-product of bile formation. The blue pigment is applied early in the shell's formation and penetrates the entire shell. The blue coloring cannot be rubbed off.
Blue eggshells are produced by the pigment oocyanin, a by-product of bile formation. The blue pigment is applied early in the shell's formation and penetrates the entire shell. The blue coloring cannot be rubbed off.
Scientists have proven that a hen does not need to see light with its eyes, it senses light with its pineal gland. They know this from working with blind hens who continue to lay eggs in response to varied lighting conditions.
Brown egg shells contain the pigment protoporphyrin, which is a by-product of hemoglobin in the blood. The brown pigment is applied during the formation of the last layer of the egg, also known as the bloom or cuticle. The inside of a brown egg is white.
A green egg-laying hen, known as an Easter Egger, or in certain circumstances, an Olive Egger, is a combination of a blue egg-laying breed and a brown egg laying breed. A green egg is blue on the inside with brown pigment on top of the shell, which creates the green hue.
A green egg-laying hen, known as an Easter Egger, or in certain circumstances, an Olive Egger, is a combination of a blue egg-laying breed and a brown egg laying breed. A green egg is blue on the inside with brown pigment on top of the shell, which creates the green hue.
 The Chicken Chick is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com
Kathy Shea Mormino, author of The Chicken Chick®

325 comments :

  1. Tammie Marsh Grant1/21/15, 5:30 PM

    This is an awesome give away! Love the info on the egg cycle:)

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  2. This is a must have... sign me up please

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  3. Rosie Wright1/21/15, 5:38 PM

    Definitely could use this :)

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  4. Great information, as usual. I was very intrigued by the article about supplemental lighting as I have not done that this winter. Today I had 8 eggs and I have 9 hens. 6 of them are newbie layers, (being hatched last May). I was just surprised by so many eggs. Normally my old flock of three do not lay in Jan. at all!

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  5. Kathy Boyer1/21/15, 5:46 PM

    Interesting information. This winter I've had a few frozen eggs and I have been cooking and feeding them back to my ladies.

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  6. I loved this. No matter how many times I have collected eggs I still think they are sooo beautiful every time!

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  7. Fred Humphrey1/21/15, 6:14 PM

    This would be nice to try!

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  8. I really didn't think a chicken could live to be as old as 20 yrs. Great info as usual. A good refresher.

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  9. Carol Johnson1/21/15, 6:15 PM

    Thanks for all these giveaways you do......

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  10. Anne Sanville Berardi1/21/15, 6:19 PM

    Thanks for the, kid friendly, egg laying video. I had searched for one on the internet but they were all VERY graphic. I want my daycare children to see how their chickens lay the eggs but without traumatizing them!

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  11. Tina Cardin1/21/15, 6:20 PM

    Great egg information.

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  12. I have only had 1 frozen so far and it didn't crack it but I feed it scrambled to my girls. They love scrambled eggs. I wish that our feed stores would get this product here in Idaho but most won't because of shipping cost :( thanks for the chance to win a bag to try

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  13. Connie Chen1/21/15, 6:23 PM

    Wow this was really interesting! My girls stopped laying in December and it's been close to 2 months.. I should try the lighting tip. Thanks!

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  14. Danielle Pearson1/21/15, 6:24 PM

    Loved reading about all the facts about eggs! I have found a few frozen eggs this winter and have gotten rid of them all. Sadly on the frozen I found was my first shell-less egg. I wish I could have gotten to that one in time just to finally be able to see one!

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  15. So interesting

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  16. Lisa Slayden Schraw1/21/15, 6:27 PM

    Great info. Thanks for sharing!

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  17. Really could use this both for my 6 hens and my kitties!

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  18. I enjoyed the info..I had one frozen egg this winter it was cracked so i threw it away..

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  19. Wendy Karcher1/21/15, 6:31 PM

    Great article.

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  20. I never knew I even wanted to know more about chickens until I found your blog. I learn something new each time you write. I don't even have my own chickens although chickens run through my yard here in Puerto Rico all day long and are on top of the house next door looking in my bedroom windows. A friend has chickens running through his yard, too, and they sleep in a huge bread fruit tree.

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  21. I love reading all the great information about chickens. We have "bought the farm" and are building. Hope to be ready for hens in the next year! Thanks for being such a great resource!

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  22. Michelle Reiche1/21/15, 6:32 PM

    Pick me! ๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ˜ƒ

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  23. I have to ask, Kathy, does Sonny always lay standing up, was it because she was a new layer and didn't know to sit down, or did you just get lucky to catch her in the act?! :) Great video!

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  24. Quackydoodle1/21/15, 6:34 PM

    You have the most beautiful eggs!

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  25. Anita Rosner1/21/15, 6:36 PM

    I love your comment about not needing a rooster to lay eggs. When women ask me this question, I ask them, "Do you need a rooster to lay your eggs?" LOL!

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  26. Karen Parsons1/21/15, 6:37 PM

    Great information. I never get tired of reading your information. Seems I learn something each time. Thank you.

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  27. Thanks for the info. It was an interesting read.

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  28. what if the hen is only laying one egg every other day? Is that normal?

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  29. Please enter me in the draw. Thank you!

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  30. Rebecca Cahill1/21/15, 6:42 PM

    keeping it fresh!

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  31. Sarah Eller1/21/15, 6:42 PM

    Would love to enter. Thanks Kathy and Sweet PDZ and Healthy World products!! @Kathy Boyer I too have not been able to get to eggs before they freeze. I do the same as you. ;) Always have.

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  32. Michele Rutter1/21/15, 6:42 PM

    Very interesting!!!

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  33. Always informative!

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  34. Becky Laakso1/21/15, 7:12 PM

    Interesting article. I learned something new about the coloring of eggs. :-)

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  35. Peggy Denton1/21/15, 7:13 PM

    Great article, as always!

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  36. Eggcellent information!

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  37. Dawn Powless1/21/15, 7:20 PM

    Wonderful info!!! Love your blog!

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  38. Wow! I have never thought of cooking them and feeding them back! Ty for info, there. I always give the shells back. Now I know how to use the winter frozen eggs from now on.

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  39. Lisa Serafini1/21/15, 7:25 PM

    Your product suggestions make both chickens and their people happy!

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  40. Yes, that's 100% normal for some hens. MOST do not lay an egg every single day, some breeds lay eggs much less frequently.

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  41. I just got lucky and caught her in the act! She was not amused by the intrusion! lol

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  42. Penny Buxton1/21/15, 7:27 PM

    Love the Chicken Chick!

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  43. Thank you, Nancy- that's a huge compliment!

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  44. I wouldn't bother at this point. Next year.

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  45. Thanks Lisa. 20 years is by no means the norm.

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  46. Eggcellent info!

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  47. Tammy Davison1/21/15, 7:53 PM

    Just saw one of my girls lay for the first time a few weeks ago.
    O_o

    Need that Pdz!!! My local supply store doesn't stock it.
    Thanks!

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  48. Karen Chiginsky1/21/15, 7:54 PM

    Loved the video. Would love the Sweet PDZ for my new coops!

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  49. Thanks for this interesting info.

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  50. Kelly O'Malley1/21/15, 7:57 PM

    I just love eggs that are all different colors so very pretty! I didn't know that there was deodorizer, going to look into this, thanks.

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  51. I want to try granular PDZ. I use powdered PDZ already and I love it!

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  52. Eggs are awesome! Would love to try the product!

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  53. Barbara Bogan Bealer1/21/15, 8:05 PM

    Sweet PDZ...Love to win this! Do so love seeing all the pics of your many colored eggs. I just have light brown (for now)!

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  54. Lynette Mattke1/21/15, 8:06 PM

    Love your articles. Thank you for the excellent information.

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  55. I can imagine not...but SCORE for you! (And US!) Thanks! 35 years of chickens and I've never actually SEEN it happen!

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  56. Jen Coghlan1/21/15, 8:16 PM

    That picture of the ovary is fascinating!

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  57. so great to discover new things about the girls.

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  58. Loved this article, the pictures & the video!

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  59. Love your blog! I learn something new each time I visit. I'm going to try the steam method for hard-cooking eggs tomorrow.

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  60. Colleen Richman1/21/15, 8:48 PM

    I would love to win, thank you!

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  61. Jennifer Judd1/21/15, 8:48 PM

    Our newest flock member is just starting to lay and her eggs are so thin they freeze right up.. Will try some of the suggestions! Thanks for the info

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  62. Lots of great info!

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  63. 10-20 years? Mine are well taken care of but my leghorn layed for about 5 years and that was it. Never since and she is perfectly healthy

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  64. Tracy Jenner1/21/15, 9:10 PM

    This product sounds great! Can it be used in litter trays too ?

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  65. My Little Ladies give me an egg each every day....I spoil them and they spoil me back.Want to win the bedding for them.

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  66. nancy weckbacher1/21/15, 9:11 PM

    I would love to try this product

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  67. Sandi Schultz1/21/15, 9:16 PM

    I surely would love to win! (and the think the girlz would be happy too!)

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  68. Birdie Barb1/21/15, 9:17 PM

    Thank you for the excellent information Kathy! The giveaway would be great to win as well.

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  69. Thanks for all of your useful information.

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  70. Wonderful information. Would love to win that Sweet PDZ!

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  71. Cheryl Prehn1/21/15, 9:23 PM

    Great info!

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  72. Bobbye Snyder1/21/15, 9:24 PM

    Wonderful info as always. Would love to win this.

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  73. Thanks, great info!!!

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  74. Adrienne Guertin Garner1/21/15, 9:37 PM

    Kathy, once again you have given us some great 'henformation.' My girls could really use some Sweet PDZ in their home.

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  75. Kambra brawner1/21/15, 9:41 PM

    Great article and giveaway! Thank you!

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  76. Brenda Reese1/21/15, 9:51 PM

    I am so thankful for all the information you give. I feel safe that I have good knowledge to care for my girls as best I can because you are my friend. Love the PDZ! I have some, but there is always room for more. My outside storage building has become my "city barn". Much much fun! And good for me, too!

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  77. Phillis Bouldin1/21/15, 9:56 PM

    Love rereading these facts, helps me retain some of them lol

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  78. Jamie Lynds Badders1/21/15, 9:59 PM

    New coop for spring time and I'd love to try Sweet PDZ!

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  79. Thanks for all of the info!

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  80. thank you for great info. love reading your blog

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  81. Sage Richards1/21/15, 10:27 PM

    Wow! so much information! Thank you! :D

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  82. Becky Lounsbury1/21/15, 10:44 PM

    Awesome info...Thank you so much

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  83. Amazed at the things you can capture in photo's and video!!

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  84. I have an egg conundrum. My 4 year old Rouen duck normally lays a pale off white egg. For several weeks now, she's only laid greenish eggs with greenish brown yolks. The egg whites are clear. She's the only duck laying through the winter. She's also the only duck that consistently goes broody, often 3 times a year. We haven't been eating her eggs but I can't for the life of me figure out what's going on! Is it something she's eating?! I realize this is not necessarily a chicken question but maybe something similar has happened in the chicken world. None of my laying hens are doing this.

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  85. Nancy Birkenstock1/21/15, 11:35 PM

    Sweet PDZ would work great with my sand bedding. Sweet!

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  86. Like this!

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  87. Noooo. Definitely no kitty litter. The chickens can eat it and it's toxic.

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  88. I don't keep ducks, sorry, Suzette.

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  89. Sandy G Williams1/22/15, 12:36 AM

    My girls will love the sweet PDZ smell in their home! Thanks for all the wonderful information! I could read all day!

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  90. xcombixgirlx1/22/15, 12:39 AM

    after 2 years!!just today i went to collect eggs and as i opened the box i watched n egg fall out of my hen lol. can't get no fresher than catching an egg falling out lol.

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  91. Nana Rominger1/22/15, 12:57 AM

    I use tons of PDZ, would love to win this :-)

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  92. Almost out of this amazing product, certainly could use another bag :)

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  93. Debbie Jaynes1/22/15, 1:15 AM

    Would so love to try PDZ

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  94. cents and savings1/22/15, 2:01 AM

    I love this! Thanks for the opportunity to win!

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  95. Another great article! I really liked this one as I finally have my birds laying again after taking a vacation for most of november and december. Silly girls.

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  96. Melanie Jones1/22/15, 2:56 AM

    I use sweet PDZ in the coop and the run.

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  97. Denise Allison Magil1/22/15, 5:17 AM

    would love to try this

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  98. Hope to win !

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  99. Sweet PDZ...yes please!!!

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  100. Very interesting! Love your blog!!!

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  101. Thanks for the fascinating information. I love your blog!

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  102. Valerie Jensen1/22/15, 8:19 AM

    I love all the info you share along with the beautiful pictures! Thank you.

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  103. Catherine LaGrange1/22/15, 8:30 AM

    as always, you're the best!

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  104. Seramasoncall1/22/15, 8:42 AM

    Thanks for all the interesting information about egg production and the chance to win the Sweet PDZ. I love that stuff!

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  105. good product

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  106. Sherri Carmody1/22/15, 9:12 AM

    Thanks for all the great information on your site. You are my "go to" chicken source. My ladies would love some Sweet PDZ (and so would I!)

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  107. Kim Collins Hunt1/22/15, 9:15 AM

    Love sweet PDZ--really helps with moisture when I use it as my poop shelf litter!

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  108. Melissa Bishop1/22/15, 9:18 AM

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge!

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  109. that is what I thought, that is why I have never used anything. but it sure would be nice to have something in the chicken house when you get these warm spells in the winter, now all my bedding is damp and smelly cuz everything was freezing before. so you can use the sweet PDZ in the chicken house? sprinkled in the bedding - I use straw.

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  110. Jamie Baker1/22/15, 9:41 AM

    Really neat video! My son and I are always trying to catch one of his girls laying, but it's really hard. He was fascinated. Thank you for the video and giveaway!

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  111. I'd love to try Sweet PDZ. The pic of the hen ovary is really cool! The kids loved it too! LOL!

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  112. Robin Morris1/22/15, 10:05 AM

    Love your information

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  113. Jennifer Steelman1/22/15, 10:08 AM

    Love this information. Thank you :). Would love to win some Sweet PDZ!

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  114. great information!

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  115. Angela Nelson-Patterson1/22/15, 10:35 AM

    I love eggs and how they form. I got to see a hen lay and egg and yuck and awesome! LOL. I just wish I knew more about what causes strange eggs... I get some of the funny looking ones every now and again!

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  116. Love your articles and giveaways too.

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  117. Have tried the pet deodorizer in my coop and love it. Would like to in this. Next I will try with my rabbits and rats.

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  118. I've been using sand with Sweet PDZ based on your recommendations, and would love to add to my supplies!

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  119. Cecelia Christensen Lunsford1/22/15, 11:23 AM

    Can't wait to try this stuff.

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  120. Would love to win this!!

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  121. Love this stuff!

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  122. Joyce Huddlestun Steber1/22/15, 1:42 PM

    I'm going to try the 'How to peel fresh eggs'. Got my Coop Tight installed and my girls were in & out within 12 hrs. They're loving it! So I need to check into the Sweet PDZ next. Thanks for all of the shares.

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  123. Still can't get it where I live and local feed store won't order it. So would love to win!

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  124. Paige Nugent1/22/15, 2:06 PM

    Need some

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  125. Valerie Nelson1/22/15, 2:06 PM

    this would be wonderful in my coop! Thank you Kathy for your great blog & a chance to win this

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  126. Dennis Doyle1/22/15, 2:08 PM

    Would be nice to try this

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  127. Love Sweet PDZ!

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  128. John A Fuller1/22/15, 2:20 PM

    Thanks so much for the in-depth information! Your site was an amazing help when my better half and I decided to build our coop and get some fancy hens :)

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  129. Kayli Bender1/22/15, 2:23 PM

    I've been wanting to try Sweet DZ but haven't been able to find any!

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  130. Susan Beaird1/22/15, 2:26 PM

    I would really like to try this product. Cant find it in my area. So lets win, win, win!!

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  131. Megan Korkowski Nicholas1/22/15, 2:32 PM

    Great information on eggs. Love your blog!

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  132. Would love love love to win!!!!

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  133. ; ) just sent the Hubs to Farmking for Sweet PDZ it rocks in the chicken run!!

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  134. Need to try some of this!

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  135. Great info!

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  136. Lori Benton1/22/15, 2:52 PM

    Love Sweet PDZ! Thanks for the chance to win!

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  137. Would love to try this !!

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  138. Sue Merrifield Meserve1/22/15, 3:26 PM

    another great giveaway! Thank you!

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  139. Love as always! Great info!

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  140. Carol Volkmann1/22/15, 3:32 PM

    Love your give aways

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  141. Thanks for all the info --I am new to chickens and soak up this info like a sponge!

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  142. Dianna Valadez Castillo1/22/15, 3:42 PM

    This would come in handy during the summer months !!

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  143. Linda Reichert1/22/15, 3:45 PM

    Thanks for the great info!

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  144. love! i need to expand my bedding options...new coop, new methods!

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  145. I am new to all of this. My husband came home this summer with a "free" rooster he got from Craigslist. We had no idea what to do with him. I did go to the Farm & Fleet and get food for him. Needless to say by the end of the summer I was totally in love with this crazy rooster we named Bill. I would rock him and feed him treats from my hand. He now has a new bachelor pad and has the run of our yard. He watches TV through the patio door and follows me from room to room outside crowing under the window where ever I am. Your site has been a blessing to me. I love the pictures and share everything on my FB page. Thank you for all you do.

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  146. Jennifer Marie Thiele1/22/15, 4:33 PM

    Sweetz!

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  147. judydowellb1/22/15, 4:58 PM

    I tried to find sweet pdz locally but no one carries it. I notified the manufacturer to send a sales rep to my local feed store and also let the feed store know. That's a case of public relations via the chicken chick via judy. And the beat goes on! Thanks for all you do as you do it well!

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  148. This chicken farmer could sure use some on himself but I would to love to win so I can freshen up my coop!

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  149. Brenda Hahr1/22/15, 5:15 PM

    If it will keep the smell down in a chicken coop in Florida, I will try it!

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  150. Would like to win this!

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  151. Cheri Foster1/22/15, 5:39 PM

    meeeeeeeeee

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  152. Tammie Weatherford1/22/15, 6:01 PM

    Awesome giveaway!!!

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  153. Truly appreciate all the information you share - I've learned so much from your site.
    Looking forward to trying the granular PDZ, and also going to give the steam-cook method for eggs a try this week! Thank you!

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  154. Love the video of the chicken laying! Great facts too! I use PDZ in my coops, still experimenting on the correct amount!

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  155. Karen Colburn1/22/15, 7:32 PM

    pick me PDZ!

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  156. Done I would love to try.

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  157. Valerie McNaught Rogers1/22/15, 8:11 PM

    thanks for the fun facts, always nice to be reminded

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  158. Peggy Denton1/22/15, 8:13 PM

    Sweet PDZ works great on my pine shavings, too!

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  159. Love the deodorizing plan!

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  160. Would love this,I've been looking for this and can never find it...must not be looking in right location?? So would love to win some!!

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  161. Kathryn Hutchison Munch1/22/15, 9:20 PM

    Thanks so much for all the great, helpful information you share with us. Love reading your posts! And my girls would love some Sweet PDZ!

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  162. this is why i interact with my chickens and treat them special

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  163. ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿ™Œ such good info!

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  164. Peggy Gossett1/22/15, 11:16 PM

    I learn things everyday from your site, and I need it for sure. Thank you.

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  165. Joe Shemry Maraia1/22/15, 11:22 PM

    Oh I love all of those colors! I can't wait for all of my girls to start laying again!

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  166. Millie Ferrin1/22/15, 11:37 PM

    Would be awesome for my coop!

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  167. Gayle Bender-Uhl1/23/15, 12:42 AM

    Would be great addition to the girls' bedding!

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  168. Would love some of this. Our chickens were so vocal yesterday, I think they were having cabin fever!

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  169. Love this stuff! And love the picture of the dark green eggs!

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  170. Jennifer Mocabee1/23/15, 12:47 PM

    I enjoyed the egg laying as Ive not yet seen my chicks actually lay an egg.....they make it look easy lol

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  171. Such a great product!

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  172. My local Tractor Supply has started carrying PDZ. Hooray!

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  173. Would love to try this!!

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  174. Vickie Redmond1/24/15, 12:25 PM

    I use this and what a difference it makes especially now that it is winter and they are in more.

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  175. Penny Shanks1/24/15, 12:27 PM

    I would like to try this.

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  176. Now that I have a real coop, I'd love to try some Sweet PDZ in it!

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  177. Kristin Leigh Erwin-Decker1/24/15, 12:36 PM

    I am very interested in using this in my coop, it would probably work great and my girls would love it.

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  178. Tami Shead Augustyn1/24/15, 12:43 PM

    Nice prize yet again!

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  179. Jamie Goodwin1/24/15, 12:43 PM

    Loving the Koop clean with pdz so I'm sure I'd love this.

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  180. Nikki Larsen1/24/15, 12:45 PM

    I've heard do many great thongs about pdz I'd love to try some

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  181. Susan Beaird1/24/15, 12:47 PM

    Awesome give-away! Would love to try this out!

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  182. Kaye La Rose1/24/15, 12:57 PM

    Another great giveaway! :)

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  183. Colette Bolster1/24/15, 1:04 PM

    Am very curious about this product and how it works!

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  184. Alan Thomas1/24/15, 1:04 PM

    Would love to try this

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  185. I could sure use this! Sounds like a great product!!

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