Dec 5, 2014

Salpingitis & Lash Eggs in Backyard Chickens: The Pus Coagulegg

This hot mess, laid by one of my hens, is often referred to as a “lash egg,” and is a very misunderstood phenomenon in backyard chicken keeping. Lash eggs consist primarily of coagulated pus, not yolk or egg white. I took the liberty of  renaming the lash egg more appropriately, a Pus Coagulegg.  It’s got a nice ring to it, don’t you think? Unfortunately for the hen, the Pus Coagulegg is no laughing matter as the prognosis for a bird producing them is poor, at best.
This hot mess, laid by one of my hens, is often referred to as a “lash egg,” and is a very misunderstood phenomenon in backyard chickens. Lash eggs consist primarily of coagulated pus, not yolk or egg white. I took the liberty of renaming the lash egg more appropriately, a Pus Coagulegg. It’s got a nice ring to it, don’t you think? Unfortunately for the hen, the Pus Coagulegg is no laughing matter as the prognosis for the chicken producing them is poor, at best.
Curiously, veterinarians do not have a catchy nickname for the lash egg, the simply refer to the nasty junk as “caseous exudate”
My research into lash eggs has lead to many contradictory theories and a great deal of inaccurate information, so I worked with Dr. Annika McKillop, DVM, MspVM, DACPV, a practicing poultry veterinarian, who spoke with me at length, explaining what causes a Pus Coagulegg, until I had a clear understanding of the problem and potential solutions. Curiously, veterinarians do not have a catchy nickname for the lash egg, the simply refer to the nasty junk as “caseous exudate.” (caseous being Latin for cheese-like) The specifics Dr. McKillip gave me went into much more technical detail than most backyard chicken keepers need to know, so I distilled it down to the essentials for you.
Dr. Annika McKillop, DVM, MspVM, DACPV, practicing poultry veterinarian, who spoke with me at length, explaining what causes a Pus Coagulegg, until I had a clear understanding of the problem and potential solutions.
Lash eggs result from an infection that causes inflammation of a hen’s oviduct. That inflammation is referred to as Salpingitis. The hen’s immune system reacts to the inflammation by trying to wall-off the infection with a waxy, cheese-like pus. This pus mass may or may not contain yolk, albumen, (egg white) eggshell, egg membrane, blood or pieces of tissue from the oviduct wall, but it is primarily a yellowish, cheesy,  pus ball.
CAUSE of PUS COAGULEGGS = SALPINGITIS
Lash eggs result from an infection (bacterial or viral) that causes inflammation of a hen’s oviduct. That inflammation is referred to as Salpingitis. The hen’s immune system reacts to the inflammation by trying to wall-off the infection with a waxy, cheese-like pus. This pus mass may or may not contain yolk, albumen, (egg white) eggshell, egg membrane, blood or pieces of tissue from the oviduct wall, but it is primarily a yellowish, cheesy,  pus ball. Salpingitis is the most common cause of death in laying hens, according to Gail Damerow in The Chicken Health Handbook. (The same immune system response to infection occurs in bumblefoot where they cheese-like pus is called the core or plug.)
The same immune system response to infection occurs in bumblefoot where they cheese-like pus is called the core or plug.
Bumblefoot core after removal from the foot. 
Lash eggs/Pus Coaguleggs are bad news for the hen. By the time one is discovered, the problem has been raging inside the hen for months and the prognosis for recovery is poor. Most hens will not survive more than 6 months with Salpingitis. According to Dr. McKillop If a hen does survive, she is unlikely ever to return to normal egg laying. I found this to be the case in one of my Partridge Plymouth Rock hens. Within four months of finding these small pieces of Pus Coagulegg, she died. She never exhibited any of the other typical signs of Salpingitis. 
By the time one is discovered, the problem has been raging inside the hen for months and the prognosis for recovery is poor. Most hens will not survive more than 6 months with Salpingitis. According to Dr. McKillop If a hen does survive, she is unlikely to return to normal egg laying.
May, 2014: These were the first bits of Pus Coagulegg found on the droppings board. In retrospect, all of the soft-shelled eggs and Pus Coaguleggs in this article came from the same hen. I was never  able to identify the hen responsible for producing them until it was too late.

The necropsy report revealed she had "a typical case of oviduct impaction and resultant compression of the intestines and internal organs." 
This hen passed within 4 months of the first sign of Salpingitis. The necropsy report revealed she had "a typical case of oviduct impaction and resultant compression of the intestines and internal organs."
Lash eggs consist primarily of coagulated pus, not yolk or egg white. I took the liberty of  renaming the lash egg more appropriately, a Pus Coagulegg.  It’s got a nice ring to it, don’t you think? Unfortunately for the hen, the Pus Coagulegg is no laughing matter as the prognosis for a bird producing them is poor, at best.
RISK FACTORS FOR SALPINGITIS
Age over 2 years
Respiratory infections (migrate from the left abdominal air sac into the oviduct)
Vent picking (E.Coli enters the oviduct from the cloaca, damaging it)
Soft-shelled egg with bits of Pus Coagulegg accompanying it.
By the time a lash egg is found, the problem has been raging inside the hen for months and the prognosis for recovery is poor. Most hens will not survive more than 6 months with Salpingitis. According to Dr. McKillop If a hen does survive, she is unlikely to return to normal egg laying.
SYMPTOMS of SALPINGITIS MAY INCLUDE:
Habitual laying of soft-shelled eggs
Excessive thirst
Lethargy or decreased activity
Abdominal swelling
Weight loss
Labored breathing
Upright, penguin-like stance
Pus Coaguleggs/lash eggs
SYMPTOMS of SALPINGITIS MAY INCLUDE: Decreased egg production Habitual laying of soft-shelled eggs Excessive thirst Lethargy or decreased activity Abdominal swelling Weight loss Labored breathing Upright, penguin-like stance Lightening of eggshell color (see chickenvet.co.uk Egg Peritonitis) Pus Coaguleggs/lash eggs Sporatic deaths
SALPINGITIS PREVENTION:
This is a tough one because the bottom line is, even with the best chicken-keeping practices, a hen can still contract salpingitis. So, as always:
Practice good backyard biosecurity.
Feed the flock properly to avoid obesity and ensure proper nutrition (not too many kitchen scraps, treats, snacks)
Control bacterial infections in baby chicks (respiratory, omphalitis, etc.)
Vaccinate birds against respiratory infections such as Bronchitis and Infectious Laryngotracheitis
Buy Clean Chicks: Acquire chicks from a supplier that is NPIP certified against Salmonella and Mycoplasma, both of which are diseases capable of being passed onto the chick inside the shell.
Necropsy: Always obtain a necropsy when a bird dies of unknown causes in order to protect the rest of the flock if possible.
Depopulate: That’s the sanitized term for euthanizing the entire flock, cleaning the area and starting clean with a new flock. It’s not realistic for most backyard flocks kept as pets.
SALPINGITIS TREATMENTS:
Antibiotics: If detected very early while the pus is relatively soft, antibiotics may help, unfortunately, signs and symptoms of salpingitis generally appear after the disease has been present for a while and by that point, antibiotic treatment isn't effective.  

Surgery: Physical removal of the ovary, oviduct and/or the pus and any egg components is possible, but the risk of infection and recurrence are high. In other countries outside of the United States, a hormone implant to suppress ovulation (yolk release) may be surgically placed by a veterinarian.

Depopulate: That’s the sanitized term for euthanizing the entire flock, cleaning the area and starting clean with a new flock. It’s not realistic for most backyard flocks kept as pets.
Lash eggs result from an infection (bacterial or viral) that causes inflammation of a hen’s oviduct. That inflammation is referred to as Salpingitis.
WHY IS A PUS COAGULEGG USUALLY EGG-SHAPED?
Since the infection occurs in the oviduct where eggs are produced, lash eggs travel through the same shaping process that normal eggs go through and are ultimately released from the hen's vent.  

WHERE DID THE TERM LASH EGG COME FROM?
The English Dialect Dictionary defines a lash egg as an egg without a full-formed shell, covered only with a tough film
A Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words defines a lash-egg as a soft-shelled egg. 

Personally, I am going to stick with "Pus Coagulegg" since it tells more about what the nasty bits, orbs, clumps and icky masses are.
Since the infection occurs in the oviduct where eggs are produced, lash eggs travel through the same shaping process that normal eggs go through and are ultimately released from the hen's vent.
 Read MORE From Dr. McKillop about salpingits & lash egg FACTS & MYTHS HERE!
Red Sexlink hen
The following photo was taken during a necropsy (post mortem examination) of a 2 yr old Red Sexlink hen.  She was a prolific layer of large eggs since the age of 4 months. She has been eating, drinking and dust-bathing normally with no sign of illness until three days before her death when she began acting lethargic & her abdomen felt swollen. 
The following photo was taken during a necropsy (post mortem examination) of a 2 yr old Red Sexlink hen.
Sources & Further reading:
Dr. Annika McKillop, DVM, MSpVM, DACPV
Diseases of Poultry, 12th Edition. Edited by Y.M. Saif (2008).
The Chicken Health Handbook, Damerow, Gail. (1994).
Avian Disease Manual, 7th Edition, ed. M. Boulianne.
The Color Atlas Diseases of the Domestic Fowl and Turkey by C.J. Randall (1985).
Dr. Jarra Jagne, DVM, DACPV, 6 Causes of Swollen Abdomen in Chickens
Seven Reasons Why Chickens Are Not Fed Hormones
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

437 comments :

  1. Tracy Jenner12/5/14, 7:41 PM

    Interesting article on the lash egg Thank you I learn all the time from this blog :)

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  2. Thanks for the information. I guess the condition that causes this can spread through the flock?

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  3. Linda Noble12/5/14, 7:46 PM

    This is a really great article, and I know if I encounter this condition it will be more helpful to me when trying to figure out what is going on. My first chicken to molt was identified because I learned about here first. My first chicken to go broody was identified because I learned about it here first. Thank you for providing so much useful information and support.

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  4. Janine Iversen12/5/14, 7:47 PM

    Fascinating, albeit disturbing, information about this "lash" egg. I had not heart of it before. Thank you for the education! Also, that waterer would come in handy! ;)

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  5. Sarah Ann Tirpak12/5/14, 7:47 PM

    I wish I never read cheese and pus in the same sentence! lol Otherwise, this is very useful information, and the rest of this blog. :-)

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  6. Patricia Lessard12/5/14, 7:50 PM

    Thank you for this new bit of information!

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  7. Thank you for the info.

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  8. germanirene12/5/14, 8:07 PM

    Very interesting . Luckily, I have not had to deal with this, yet!!!

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  9. Carol Maclean-Denney12/5/14, 8:10 PM

    I found this very helpful as a first time back yard chicken Mom I want the best for my hens and one rooster. I have only had them two months so I am reading everything I can to learn. Thank you for writing this I would of had no idea what it was should I find that waxy mess! Also thanks for the tips about obesity my hens are silkies and love to be held and eat out of my hand I will limit their treats!

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  10. Gale Lanning Conner12/5/14, 8:11 PM

    Well that's one thing I hope I never see... good info to have as always. Thanks for the chance to win!

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  11. Excellent article! Thanks for sharing!!!

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  12. Karen Chiginsky12/5/14, 8:13 PM

    Super information as usual and a smashing good giveaway!

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  13. Oh my, thanks for the article. I pray I never see one of those in my nesting box!

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  14. Janine Brooks12/5/14, 8:15 PM

    A very sad way for a chicken to go. We recently acquired our girls, have had two times where they've been sick. It is hard to find them proper veterinary care (in the city) . . . so I can only imagine the pain being that much more when you have no one to take your girl to for medical advice.

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  15. Quackydoodle12/5/14, 8:17 PM

    You learn something new every day,,,

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  16. Brenda Reese12/5/14, 8:18 PM

    Thank you so much for this information. Although my flock is just 5, I love them all so much.

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  17. great article!!

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  18. Raeann Dunn12/5/14, 8:18 PM

    Never heard of or saw this before. Thanks for the info!

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  19. I JUST said that out loud to my husband. It had to have been a horrible death.:(

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  20. Welcome to chicken keeping, Carol!

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  21. Nope. But neither is caring for any animal when there is a problem.

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  22. Some of the underlying infections that cause the inflammation of the oviduct ARE contagious.

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  23. Misty Walker12/5/14, 8:22 PM

    Wow. That's nasty. I've gotta say, I truly hope I NEVER encounter this in my flock! Thanks for the information. Nothing like a little education to make a person paranoid. haha!

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  24. Apparently you haven't had the pleasure of reading my bumblefoot article, Sarah! :D

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  25. Shelly Brown12/5/14, 8:23 PM

    Thank you for sharing, especially the pictures. I am sorry your girl went through this.

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  26. Andi Williams12/5/14, 8:24 PM

    Thank you for this information. I learn so much from your blog!

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  27. Thank you, Shelly. I am sorry she went through it too. :(

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  28. would really like a fountain for my ladies..thank you for the chance to win...

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  29. Illegal Chicken Chick12/5/14, 8:25 PM

    My Girls sure wish they could have one of these! The post are always so informative, even though this one was kind of icky I hope we(the girls and I) never get a lash egg!

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  30. Great information!!! I had no idea how serious this could be

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  31. Angie Williamson Graske12/5/14, 8:25 PM

    Wow, great info! ! Love all you do.

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  32. such good information never heard of thus before and thankfully haven't had any signs of it in my girls

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  33. I never knew about this condition. It was very interesting and I appreciate the info. The prize is fantastic. I would definitely love to win. Lol. Good luck everyone and I hope all y'all have a great weekend.

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  34. If it's not good enough for your garden, it's not good enough for your chickens.

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  35. Colleen Richman12/5/14, 8:32 PM

    Thanks for the giveaway I enter every one maybe some day I'll win :) Good luck to everyone!

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  36. Cher Shipman12/5/14, 8:32 PM

    So sorry to hear of the loss of your hen. Thanks for the article-- and the pictures were really helpful in understanding it too!

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  37. Very informative--I had never heard of this before.

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  38. Would love to win!

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  39. Rose Nicely Carver12/5/14, 8:34 PM

    wow i will def be keeping my eye on the eggs thank you

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  40. Dolly Rickerman12/5/14, 8:34 PM

    Great article!!!

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  41. I never read of this before. Hopefully I won't ever have this problem with my girls.

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  42. Wow, thank you for the info!

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  43. Never heard of these. Hope I never find one but appreciate you sharing the info.

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  44. DreadPiratePatty12/5/14, 8:40 PM

    Thank you for this! I got my first soft missing the shell egg today. Luckily, I had already read your blog about weird eggs so I didn't panic. My hens are very young and have just started laying this month so I'll take it as "normal" while their plumbing gets into full swing. I will be on the lookout for this horrid thing, hopefully won't have to ever see one but if so I'll know what it is.

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  45. Darnell Winkel12/5/14, 8:41 PM

    Thanks for the information. A few weeks ago I had a hen with what looked to me like a bunch of cooked egg yolk impacted in her vent. I didn't think that I could do it but I helped her remove as much of it as I could. I did some research at the time and thought that it was what they call egg yolk pereotis (sp?). It sounds a lot like this now though. She is still alive but not her perky self. I am wondering now if the humane thing would be to cull her. She is thin but eating and drinking.

    I would love to win a chicken fountain. I have one but would love another one. Great product.

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  46. judydowellb12/5/14, 8:41 PM

    Great article and a great opportunity to hopefully win a chicken waterer! I tote water, switch out dirty water, wash my dishes and my girls, too. This would be a great addition to my humble coop. Thanks for all you do! The information is timeless and very informative!

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  47. Amanda Decker12/5/14, 8:43 PM

    Probably shouldn't have read this right after dinner. eww! But the info is good to know in case I ever see it in the coup, so thanks are in order! PS So glad to hear your chickens are safe from cranky neighbors!

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  48. Catherine LaGrange12/5/14, 8:43 PM

    My 5 girls are just starting to lay regularly. I pray they never have to go through this. Thanks for all the info

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  49. Something I've never heard of. As usual fabulous information!

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  50. Stacy Embleton12/5/14, 8:47 PM

    I am so sorry your hen had to go through this but even more so for your children. Our daughter is so bonded with her hens. Every time it time to process she grieves a bit but always has time to say good bye. You made mention of potentially needing to start from scratch if the rest of the hens are affected. Did you have to do that? I pray not but we can learn from everything we go through in life. Bless you!

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  51. Rooster Rudy12/5/14, 8:47 PM

    Amazing! 20+ years of raising hens and never have seen or heard of this. Are certain breeds more susceptible? Great blog! My students love it!!

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  52. I have had soft-shelled eggs on occasion, but have never seen one of these before, Very interesting, Give away would be perfect as I am trying to decide on a watering system for my new coops and run that would be practical and time saving. I know this would be a wonderful solution to most of the problem I am facing, Good Luck all!

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  53. Kim Warfield Weber12/5/14, 8:50 PM

    Very interesting article on lash eggs. I had never heard of this before. I'm learning something new almost daily about chickens. Excellent giveaway - keeping my fingers crossed.

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  54. Wow , I've never heard of this!

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  55. Jennifer May12/5/14, 8:51 PM

    Great info, as always!!

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  56. Karen Warner12/5/14, 8:55 PM

    I just lost my beloved Peaches to Salpingitis. Thank you for the best article I have ever read on the topic. It helps to understand what happened to her. Once again, thank you so much. The prize is awesome, and of course I would love to win.

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  57. Rachael Schilling-Payne12/5/14, 8:56 PM

    So me
    I have good information. Cheering your victory too!

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  58. Sarah Smith Hammond12/5/14, 8:56 PM

    Is it contagious?

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  59. beverlybowman12/5/14, 8:59 PM

    Can you eat the eggs of a chicken being wormed with Wazine? I have placed them in a bucket to scramble as I am unsure.

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  60. katpolkadot12/5/14, 9:01 PM

    That is crazy! I'm amazed at all the conditions a chicken can get. Really want to do good to keep mine all healthy

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  61. Possibly the first time I've ever gagged from a photo but great information that I never would have known otherwise, thank you!

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  62. Coagulegg is catchy, although disgusting. .. thanks for the info its great for me, I am a beginner and I love the science based approach.

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  63. roastbeefrb12/5/14, 9:04 PM

    I have never won

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  64. Megan Krauth12/5/14, 9:05 PM

    Wow, kind of scary... I'll definitely be keeping an eye out for signs of those from my ladies.

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  65. roastbeefrb12/5/14, 9:06 PM

    I just got my coop refurbihed and this would be GREAT to have

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  66. Thanks for this informative but gross information! Now I have learned something new today :) I hope I never have to deal with it. So if you find one of your hens has had this infection, will all your flock be infected with it? Thanks again for the education.

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  67. Wow great information here. I had not heard of this. I did find a soft egg as shown a couple weeks back but not seen another like this. I do not know if it was like the other 3 eggs I found under the roost bar, my new girls I guess didn't know to drop in the next boxes. I found 4 under the roost and one outside. None since then. All eggs have been normal. But now I know if I see something like this I will know what it is and not be shocked. Thank you for sharing this information.

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  68. I hope I win. Thanks for the disgusting information! Hope I never ever find that!

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  69. I had this happen!!!!!!!!! Wow, now I know I'm not crazy! I described it as an INSIDE-OUT Egg that kind of stunk. Wondering too, this particular hen also had several bouts with Sour Crop. Are the two related and do you have any pointers on how to handle SOUR CROP?

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  70. Lori Benton12/5/14, 9:20 PM

    What a disgustingly fascinating article! Thank you for dumbing it down enough for us to understand. I will keep a lookout for these weird little tidbits. And the waterer would be great!

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  71. I had never heard of this either, good to know. Thank you!

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  72. Lisa West-Harper12/5/14, 9:23 PM

    Thanks for that information, never heard of it before.

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  73. Always something new to learn, and this is the place to learn it. Thank you so much for all the great information!

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  74. I hope we never have to deal with this issue in our small flock!

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  75. Angela Ratliff12/5/14, 9:26 PM

    Thanks for all the good info.

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  76. Rachel J Johnson12/5/14, 9:28 PM

    Can always learn something new! Thx.

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  77. This information was very interesting to me. I hope I never have to find one of these or a chicken in this condition.
    I love this watering system. I have asked my husband for one for Christmas. Perhaps I can ask for something else if I win this. :)

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  78. Rosemary Conklin12/5/14, 9:38 PM

    This is very interesting, and I hope I never see one from my girls. I always know where to go to get answers to even the most unusual questions. Thanks so much for keeping us all so well informed! would love to win the fountain.

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  82. Wow. Yet another new thing for me to learn about. Thanks!

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  83. Romi Schlem12/5/14, 9:47 PM

    After all the years of having chickens I have never encountered this! Thank you for the information!

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  84. Harold Garcia12/5/14, 9:49 PM

    Ok, YUCK, but informative! Thanks!

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  85. Jennifer Mocabee12/5/14, 9:50 PM

    I just got 3 pullets for my rooster, There have been no eggs yet, so not sure if they're old enough yet? 2 americaunas and a wyandotte . I guess all females regardless of species have reproductive issues, but wow, a sad and probably painful condition for the chick...my condolences on the loss of your gal....

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  86. I found this in a nesting box at a friends farm. We had no idea what it was or from which hen it came from. I'll share this information with him a asap! Thanks so much

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  87. Thanks for another great blog article.

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  88. Alyssa Proffitt Brown12/5/14, 10:01 PM

    So sorry for the chicken who went through that!

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  89. Teresa Scamardo12/5/14, 10:03 PM

    Great article about lash eggs...

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  90. Very informative, thanks again.

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  91. brilliant renaming job. I hope to never have to see one.

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  92. Thanks for sharing that interesting, and I'm sure rare piece of information. Glad to have a word for it in case I ever need to look it up too.

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  93. Jannell Istre Wells12/5/14, 10:14 PM

    Very enlightening write up on the lash egg - I will definitely watch for any signs in my girls.

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  94. Ferne McAllister12/5/14, 10:16 PM

    Very informative. Thanks!

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  95. David Butch LaBombard12/5/14, 10:16 PM

    That article was a first for ever hearing of such a terrible disease. Thank you

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  96. Jennifer Hershberger12/5/14, 10:18 PM

    So thankful for all the good information you share here!
    Also hoping to win... you are da bomb for having so many awesome drawings!

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  97. I've never heard of this before and I grew up with chickens. Wow, that is so bizarre! I hope I never find something like this in my nest boxes.

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  98. Love the good doctor! She has seen my flock too!!!

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  99. emilia marko12/5/14, 10:27 PM

    Thanks for the knowledge, the more we know...

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  100. Sandi Bergeron12/5/14, 10:31 PM

    I like your new Christmas header! This info on the Lash Egg is on the level of "I think I just threw up in my mouth"feeling. This would go under the same category- digestive system -"What's the Scoop on the Poop,schooling. Or maybe even under "Things I wish I knew (or didn't know" before I got chickens." Maybe I'm coming down with something, I'm feeling a bit nauseous. It truly is important to know and understand these maladies, and I thank you for it. I hope I never ever come across one of these lash eggs. The grossness is at all time high in this but all kidding aside I do take your educational info seriously. I love your candor, frankness and substantiated information. Rock on Kathy!

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  101. Heather Golden Norris12/5/14, 10:32 PM

    Ew....but very informative!

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  102. Stephanie Domer12/5/14, 10:35 PM

    Never knew about this issue. Glad to know..

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  103. Thank you for your information about lash egg. I haven't had one and hope I never do.but with 60 girls. Thanks for the giveaway waterer. I could use it.

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  104. Julia Grammer12/5/14, 10:37 PM

    Ewwww! Good info though. I certainly hope I never come face to face with any of those nasty " Coagulegg"s.

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  105. I am glad I have been lucky! 30 years of chicken keeping and I have never seen or heard of this! Thank you for the information!!

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  106. Great info on coaguleggs.

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  107. Wow very interesting I hope I never have to deal with this problem but thank you for sharing this information.

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  108. thank you for the information. learning so much each time I visit your blog.

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  109. Kathleen Dean12/5/14, 10:49 PM

    Well it wasn't pretty but it was very informative. You have given us another tool in our tool belt.
    Thank you Kathy!

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  110. Lori Edmison12/5/14, 11:06 PM

    Oh my - that is nasty & very unfortunate for the poor girl. I hope I never see that in my flock.

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  111. Ok...that was...gross...

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  112. Is this a contagious condition? Is that the reason for depopulation?

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  113. Geraldine Mack12/5/14, 11:33 PM

    Thank you for the information . I did not know this .

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  114. Charlene M Garrigan12/5/14, 11:34 PM

    I've never heard of this before. As usual you are a great educator! Thanks - we appreciate you!

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  115. Just getting started and excited to get my kiddos some chicks for Christmas. Thanks for all the useful information your site provides.

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  116. Peggy Denton12/5/14, 11:43 PM

    Tell me that's not a common thing, because I've had chickens for over 20 years and have NEVER seen anything that freakin' gross!

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  117. Learn something new every day!

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  118. Thanks for this detail. I'm new to chickens and a fair percentage of my flock are older, so I'm always wondering what I should look out for them, so far so good, except now the coop is leaking in this exceptional rain here in California.

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  119. Christy Duplantie12/6/14, 12:16 AM

    Very informative- Thank you

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  120. Ew, informative and valuable, but Ew! :) Thank you!

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  121. Yikes! Thanks for the info!

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  122. Cathy Stoddard12/6/14, 12:36 AM

    Thanks for the great information!!!!

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  123. My, my. What will those gals come up with next...

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  124. Deborah Kerr-Jones12/6/14, 12:50 AM

    Haven't had that yet and hope the ladies stay healthy. Winter is a challenge. Would love the fountain as a Christmas present for my babies.

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  125. Thanks for the informative article. Would love to win the watering system.

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  126. Deanna J Alexander Porter12/6/14, 1:10 AM

    Great article!

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  127. Kristie Knoll Burke12/6/14, 1:18 AM

    so much to learn

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  128. Stephanie W12/6/14, 1:36 AM

    Wonderfully explained and illustrated! I hope you will do a book someday. Keep up with the good information. Kudos!!

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  129. Lisa Steenberg12/6/14, 2:25 AM

    Excellent article! (As usual!) I'm filing that one away for the future. Though I hope I never see one.

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  130. Dana Hansen12/6/14, 2:45 AM

    Always looking to learn more about the chickens I will be inheriting with our new house in a couple of weeks. Thank you!

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  131. Learning new things about my hens every day

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  132. Yuck!, I would sure hate to find a Pus Coagulegg in my laying box!

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  133. lauren Flaherty12/6/14, 7:51 AM

    Thank you for sharing this information. I just lost a girl on Thanksgiving to this problem..

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  134. Very informative post.

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  135. Interesting article. Thanks

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  136. Thanks for the info!

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  137. hard to read, but so necessary! thanks so much for sharing it!

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  138. I would love to win this among a few other giveaways but this is most convenient. Thanks for the chance.

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  139. Thanks again for another informative Lesson,

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  140. I've never heard of this. Your article on Bumblefoot really came in handy as I treated one of our girls for it. We've had some respiratory issues this year - it's been really hard - and if this might be an additional element of it, at least I'll be prepared. Thanks so much for what you do and so glad for you that the legal and neighbor issues have been (somewhat) resolved. You're awesome!

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  141. Who knew? Thankful for all your informative topics explained in terms that are easy to understand.

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  142. Alicia Crump12/6/14, 9:41 AM

    Yuck. I've never heard of this but now I know in case it happens. Thank you! On a positive note, I really hope I win the chicken fountain!

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  143. Denise Krough Britton12/6/14, 9:42 AM

    Very Interesting thanks so much. I never heard of this till now.

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  144. I NEED this in my new coop my husband is building!

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  145. Caitlyn Ralston12/6/14, 9:44 AM

    Thanks for the great information! I would also love to win the Chicken Fountain for my new coop! Thanks for the opportunity!

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  146. Very interesting! Thanks!!

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  147. Helen Swire Comer12/6/14, 9:48 AM

    I always know that I can count on you for my continuing chicken education and I feel truly blessed that my girls, knock on wood, have had no serious issues!! Thank you for sharing your wealth of knowledge!

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  148. Lori Thomson Hohl12/6/14, 9:52 AM

    Thank you for the information. Winning the Chicken Fountain watering system would be so awesome.

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  149. I am re-posting as I guess mine didn't send? Thank you for the information here. I am so sorry this happened to your chicken. I know e get attached to our girls. I found a soft egg like this one shown right after my new girls just started laying. I found 4 eggs in the poop box below the nesting box & one outside. I assumed it was because they didn't know they were laying or didn't know to lay in the nesting box? Does that happen with new girls first lays? So far have not seen anymore soft eggs & it has been about 2 weeks now. Thank you again for the information, guess I am going to slow on the treats they get. they get seeds,corn & worms every 3 days. But thinking that needs to be cut out. Thank you for the contest again also.

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  150. Mary Cosner12/6/14, 9:54 AM

    As always, very informative. Just glad I had already eaten my egg for breakfast. LOL ;)

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  151. Good info to know about. Gross, but good info. Thanks!

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  152. Diana Waller12/6/14, 9:57 AM

    I sooooooo want this waterer. Pick me! :)

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  153. Cindy Gadberry12/6/14, 9:59 AM

    Learning so much! Ty

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  154. Would love! My boys will be moving out soon and in gonna get stuck with the job!☺ tbishyer@yahoo.com

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  155. Meloni Harris12/6/14, 10:02 AM

    Thank you for another awesome giveaway! I did not know about these lash eggs. Thank you for the info.

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  156. Happy I have never had that problem with any of my hens!

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  157. Thank you for your informative posts!

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  158. Sierra Dawn Clemons12/6/14, 10:14 AM

    O.O omigosh that looks awful! I hope nothing like this ever happens to any members of my flock! Also I would love to win one of these chicken fountains! :-D

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  159. I would love to win this. ...would make life easier.
    Thanks for the educational info.

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  160. Patricia Mangum12/6/14, 10:16 AM

    you are such a good resource!

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  161. Love to have this

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  162. Probably shouldn't read this article before breakfast. Eew. But, as always, thanks for the great info!

    Would love to win this waterer, but I do have a question about water loss. As we live in a desert state, water waste is a big deal. Can you give me more info about how much water is lost daily, weekly, etc?

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  163. Great info, thank you. My turkeys would sure like that waterer!

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  164. These egg problems are all new to me. Thank you for teaching us the real things we need to know about out chickens. I love my hens and would be freaked out if they layed one of these.

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  165. Jeni Minguez Mogg12/6/14, 10:27 AM

    One more thing to file away in the "chicken chick said" file in my brain. I didn't totally lose it when I found the rubber egg earlier this week since I remembered your post that it is normal for new layers. Saved my sanity there again!

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  166. great information!

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  167. That's a more descriptive name for it. I would love to win the waterer and not have to scrub mine each week!

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  168. Wow, very interesting. You really should publish a book!

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  169. Thank you for the info!

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  170. Very interesting read. I learned something new! I hope to not see these up close and personal. This chicken watering system would be awesome to have! I'm assuming once subscribed to your blog via e-mail, it is not required for each contest? Love following you!

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  171. Just working up the intestinal fortitude to begin raising chickens come spring! Stuff like this is of concern, but the rewards of a healty flock out weighs all.

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  172. Ellen Field-Williams12/6/14, 10:46 AM

    It's always a great day when I can learn something new about chickens.

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  173. Melanie Jones12/6/14, 10:47 AM

    Thanks for sharing the information. That looks horrible! So much to learn about chickens.

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  174. Ann-maree Rain12/6/14, 10:51 AM

    "WOW!" That lash egg is scary! I have never heard of that since now. I have kind of relented I do everything in my power to provide quality of life for my five hens. I have learnt over the years sometimes regardless of what you do, sometimes you can still lose them. However, I will never give up trying. To me they are more than just a chicken and deserve quality of life.That is why I love reading your blogs I learn so much.

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  175. Rachel J Johnson12/6/14, 10:55 AM

    I'd love to have one! Plz enter me!

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  176. Wow... Information is power, but that is just gross. I sincerely hope our ladies never go through this!

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  177. Pretty gross but very good info to know. Thanks for sharing, I'd never heard of this before..... Sorry you lost a hen but thanks for sharing thr info and pics with us. And the chicken fountain, what an awesome product, that would be great to have for my little flock of cochins. Thanks for thr Chsnce to win

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  178. Wow, gross!

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  179. Awww that is so sad when you do all you can to take proper care and mother nature proves to you that it really isn't all under your control. hugs If the infection is internal why would you kill other hens? and starting over that is a bit extreme. It is just something that happens like in breeding a rare cat Turkish Vans we have found there are danger ages to watch them at 2-3 years can be some serious problems as hormones stabilize and growth stops usually respiratory infections sometimes dental trouble and the worst one cancers show up. At 8 years kidney failure and kibble fed cats die of diabetes if a cat lives past 8 it is likely to live to 20 It is the cycle of life and since chickens have a shorter lifespan then perhaps you should note ages and problems that occur ans see if it may indeed start showing a pattern Best of luck love your site and you and your girls and boys I am now packing for the big move lol rule of thumb loww stress calm ebery hen in its place lol

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  180. Tiffany Blickhan12/6/14, 11:09 AM

    This waterer looks so much more sanitary than the ones I'm using now.. especially with ducks!

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  181. This would get a lot of attention in the run with my girls.

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  182. Megan Korkowski Nicholas12/6/14, 11:13 AM

    Would love this watering system!

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  183. Carol Johnson12/6/14, 11:13 AM

    that's a lot of information here

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  184. Wow. . I have never heard about this! So sad though. Thank you for writing about it. The more you know . . .Thank you

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  185. Oh my ladies really need that Chicken Fountain... Please enter them!

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  186. Wow very informative! Thank you!

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  187. Want the water thing!!

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  188. Kim Smith Barnaby12/6/14, 11:29 AM

    I really want to win this waterer! Keeping my fingers crossed :)

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  189. I had no idea, I will be sure to look out for this!

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  190. I am sorry to say this is disgusting to me. I just hate that our poor chickens have to go through so many medical issues. Thank you for making it understandable at least, but yuck. I have never seen this, and I hope I never do. But at least I will know what it is. Thank you for the chance to win the waterer.

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  191. Brenda Reese12/6/14, 11:38 AM

    Just 5 hens! Hahahah!

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  192. Would love one of these!

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  193. So grateful for all of the information I get from you....Never had chickens before...I love my "girls"....

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  194. Very interesting! I keep trying to win one of the Chicken Fountains!

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  195. I had no idea that chickens suffered from this. :(

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  196. Lynne Judd Anderson12/6/14, 12:06 PM

    I have come across one or two of these before. Don't really want to see there others in my nest boxes!

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  197. Gross...chickens are fascinating creatures.Good to know all these strange things about them in case we are ever faced with these oddities.Would love to win the prize!

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