Jun 26, 2014

Chicken Mating: How Does That Work?

This article covers things you never wanted to know about rooster reproductive anatomy and chicken mating, including up-close and personal photos. Soon you will be well equipped to impress friends and business associates at cocktail parties with an alarming amount of information about chicken copulation.
This article covers things you never wanted to know about rooster reproductive anatomy and chicken mating, including up-close and personal photos. Soon you will be well equipped to impress friends and business associates at cocktail parties with an alarming amount of information about chicken copulation. For starters, roosters have a bit of a physical challenge in the romance department because all of their reproductive anatomy, male parts, equipment is inside their bodies. A fair amount of physical agility is required to get everything where it needs to go to close the deal and it’s not always pretty to watch. In fact, the uninitiated may not even be aware of what’s happening when they witness chickens mating- it happens in a matter of seconds and it’s remarkable that it works at all given the absence of  the usual male appendage.
For starters, roosters have a bit of a physical challenge in the romance department because all of their reproductive anatomy, male parts, equipment is inside their bodies. A fair amount of physical agility is required to get everything where it needs to go to close the deal and it’s not always pretty to watch. In fact, the uninitiated may not even be aware of what’s happening when they witness chickens mating- it happens in a matter of seconds and it’s remarkable that it works at all given the absence of  the usual male appendage. 
For starters, roosters have a bit of a physical challenge in the romance department because all of their reproductive anatomy, male parts, equipment is inside their bodies. A fair amount of physical agility is required to get everything where it needs to go to close the deal and it’s not always pretty to watch. In fact, the uninitiated may not even be aware of what’s happening when they witness chickens mating- it happens in a matter of seconds and it’s remarkable that it works at all given the absence of  the usual male appendage.
COURTING BEHAVIOR-Chicken Speed Dating
There are no flowers, no dinner and a movie, so how does a rooster impress the chicks? Some roosters don’t even bother trying, they’ll simply take charge of their mate, but the more romantic types have a few go-to moves they rely upon to dazzle the ladies, which can include any of the following:
There are no flowers, no dinner and a movie, so how does a rooster impress the chicks? Some roosters don’t even bother trying, they’ll simply take charge of their mate, but the more romantic types have a few go-to moves they rely upon to dazzle the ladies
There are no flowers, no dinner and a movie, so how does a rooster impress the chicks? Some roosters don’t even bother trying, they’ll simply take charge of their mate, but the more romantic types have a few go-to moves they rely upon to dazzle the ladies
*The Matador
This patent-pending rooster move is clearly intended to attract a hen’s attention and mesmerize her with his size and beauty. The rooster fans his wings flamboyantly while dancing around her in the same way a matador fans his cape to attract the bull. I made that name up, but this move is commonly referred to as: the wing drag, wing drop or wing flicking.
The Matador. This patent-pending rooster move is clearly intended to attract a hen’s attention and mesmerize her with his size and beauty. The rooster fans his wings flamboyantly while dancing around her in the same way a matador fans his cape to attract the bull. I made that name up, but this move is commonly referred to as: the wing drag, wing drop or wing flicking.
*The Two-step
In conjunction with the wing drag, a rooster will often dance in a circle, trying to position himself behind her to assume the mating position.
This video shows Brutus impressing the ladies by tidbitting.
*Tidbitting:
Picking up actual or pretend morsels of food while calling the hen over to investigate is the oldest trick in the book. When she comes over to see what’s up, that’s when he makes his move. 
With apologies to Hasbro and my daughters whose Play Doh I pirated for this illustration, I present you with a rudimentary model of the rooster reproductive system. Parts are not to scale.
With apologies to Hasbro and my daughters whose Play Doh I pirated for this illustration, I present you with a rudimentary model of the rooster reproductive system. Parts are not to scale. ☺

BOY PARTS.
Here comes the “too much information” part of the program, folks.
A rooster's sexual organ is called the papilla, which is located inside the bird just inside the wall of his cloaca. It looks like a small bump and is not at all similar in form or function to a penis except the extent that semen exits through it. 
Here comes the “too much information” part of the program, folks. A rooster's sexual organ is called the papilla, which is located inside the bird just inside the wall of his cloaca. It looks like a small bump and is not at all similar in form or function to a penis except the extent that semen exits through it.
The photo above is as close as any of us are likely to see the reproductive organ of a live rooster and I had NO intention of capturing this image on film. 
Sorry for the invasion of privacy, Caesar, it's for a good cause.
 The hen inverts her cloaca to meet the rooster's presentation of his and accept the semen into her reproductive tract.
The hen inverts her cloaca to meet the rooster's presentation of his and accept the semen into her reproductive tract.
The rooster gets into position, which resembles a piggy-back ride, standing on her back, holding her neck feathers with his beak and steadying himself with his feet. This activity, known as treading. The hen crouches down, spreads her wings to the side for balance and lowers her tail in a position I call the submissive squat.     Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business.
THE ACT
So..how DO they do the deed?
The rooster gets into position, which resembles a piggy-back ride, standing on her back, holding her neck feathers with his beak and steadying himself with his feet. This activity is known as treading. The hen crouches down, spreads her wings to the side for balance and lowers her tail in a position I call the submissive squat.  
Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business. Ain't love grand?
Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business. Ain't love grand?
Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business. Ain't love grand?
Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business. Ain't love grand?
Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business. Ain't love grand?
Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business. Ain't love grand?
Since the papilla is located inside his cloaca, (vent area) his cloaca must touch hers to transfer the sperm from his body to hers.This touching together of cloacas is commonly referred to as the “cloacal kiss.” That’s all there is to it- he hops off and she shakes out her feathers and each goes about his or her business. Ain't love grand?
Treading can cause feather damage, bald spots and skin damage to the hen. A cloth apron, also known as a hen saddle, can be worn by the hen as protection from too frequent or too aggressive treading. Learn more about hen saddles here
Treading can cause feather damage, bald spots and skin damage to the hen. A cloth apron, also known as a hen saddle, can be worn by the hen as protection from too frequent or too aggressive treading.
MISCELLANEOUS INFO:
A hen does not need a rooster to produce eggs. A hen will lay eggs with the same frequency regardless of the presence or absence of  a rooster in the flock. Learn about how a hen makes eggs HERE.
A hen does not need a rooster to produce eggs. A hen will lay eggs with the same frequency regardless of the presence or absence of  a rooster in the flock.
Facts and myths about fertile eggs can be found HERE!
A hen does not need a rooster to produce eggs. A hen will lay eggs with the same frequency regardless of the presence or absence of  a rooster in the flock.
Bantams roosters (small breeds) can successfully mate with large fowl hens. Learn about rooster fertility HERE.
Bantams roosters (small breeds) can successfully mate with large fowl hens.
Bantams roosters (small breeds) can successfully mate with large fowl hens.
Sources & further reading:
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

511 comments :

  1. Sherry Harmon6/26/14, 3:30 PM

    Great article!! Scratch and Peck Feeds are awesome ~ I'd love to win!!

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  2. Jeannie Palmer6/26/14, 3:31 PM

    Very interesting article. Thank you!!

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  3. Beth Whipp Smith6/26/14, 3:34 PM

    I've been trying to explain this adventure to friends. Now I have pics and everything! This is awesome. Thanks!

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  4. I've always called it the rooster dance and I find it hilarious. Also, have you shown Rachel this evidence you have of Blaze's indiscretions or are you planning to blackmail him?

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  5. Oh, and I (my girls, actually) would love some scratch and peck. LOL

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  6. Lori Benton6/26/14, 3:36 PM

    Very well-handled! Good information to know, though, I will never look at Play Doh the same again! :)

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  7. Interesting information. our rooster is almost old enough to start mating with the girls we hope to hatch a clutch this fall.

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  8. Paul Shepard6/26/14, 3:37 PM

    Wow...thats all I can say about this article. ..wow

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  9. Jessi Carson6/26/14, 3:38 PM

    Or as it is known in my house (thanks to the boys) "Mom, they're at it again" or "Whelp! They're breeding again!" or the other one known as "She's going to be bald!"
    Great post for those that don't know. And the feed? Awesome feed!

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  10. I have not and do not intend to. :D

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  11. Cheryl Prehn6/26/14, 3:42 PM

    What an informative bunch of information, including the accidental picture!

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  12. Kelly Miller6/26/14, 3:42 PM

    wow on the video. would love the scratch and peck for the girls. thanks

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  13. Sarah Grefe6/26/14, 3:42 PM

    You crack me up, this interesting information. :) I feel better that my girls are loosing their feathers for a purpose and not just Fred being mean.

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  14. Good info! Learned a few things I didn't know about!

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  15. Maria Campbell6/26/14, 3:43 PM

    I wish I had a dollar for everytime someone says, "How do you get eggs if you don't have a rooster?" and five dollars for how to they fertilize the eggs and then when I tell them, they say "Ew, TMI, TMI" We'd all be rich

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  16. Melissa D. SC6/26/14, 3:43 PM

    Thank you for the information! So if you have seen the two mating and you want to insure that you get baby chicks...how do you know when to take the eggs or leave them so that they get laid on? I hope that is making sense...still trying to inform myself before I get my chickens. Thanks.

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  17. Amanda Wayer6/26/14, 3:45 PM

    Our rooster is grabbing and holding the hens combs while mating. They are all bloody at the base of their combs. What should we do? We have treated the hens but it keeps happening.

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  18. I've wondered about the specifics of this, thanks for explaining!

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  19. Sandi Butler6/26/14, 3:50 PM

    Thank you for the information! Even if it was TMI!

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  20. Oh my! I think you've ruined play doh for me! Very interesting article though! Thanks for the info.

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  21. ok that WAS more info and pics than i really needed to learn :P LOL

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  22. That was a very good article. Loved the play-doh(put a smile on my face). I would think that a bantam rooster wouldn't do as much damage to a full-sized hen. I don't have a rooster and that was one of the reasons why. I didn't want to mess with aprons.

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  23. Useful and so funny. Thanks! (And yes, please for the scratch and peck. )

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  24. Great article. I learn so much from you! We have 12 hens and 1 rooster (Cogburn, LOL) and he is one busy guy! Several of the hens have the feather loss you described and now I know the cause. Thank you

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  25. Dani Kelley6/26/14, 3:56 PM

    Um... Yep, this ought to keep them staring at us at our next "cocktail" party! I'd love to wind the feed, but either way, I always get SO much out of your blog. Today was... an unexpected bonus LOL

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  26. Kathryn Andrews6/26/14, 3:58 PM

    Fascinating! Chicken biology is incredible.

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  27. I never knew!

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  28. I push chicken stories on all my friends....Just wait til I get to wow them with this!!!!!!! Thanks for sharing...

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  29. Wow! That is all.

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  30. Oh, our daughter isn't allowed to play with play dough. LOL

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  31. Lol I've seen my 16 weekers trying this out

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  32. These articles should help you, Melissa: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2013/01/facts-and-myths-about-fertile-eggs.html

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/03/chicken-encyclopedia-meets-max.html

    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/01/how-hen-makes-egg-egg-oddities.html

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  33. You'll have to separate them from each other because there isn't anything you can do to protect her head from him holding onto it.

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  34. Lena Franceschini6/26/14, 4:08 PM

    My personal favorite.... One of my roosters suddenly notices a hen from across the yard... Stomps his feet, and runs, full speed, with wings out, directly towards her. Sometimes he'll run half an acre! Then it's all business.

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  35. Avarie Owens6/26/14, 4:09 PM

    I would love a bag of chicken feed! It would be so helpful for fair time!!:)

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  36. Melinda McClain6/26/14, 4:10 PM

    A question: How often must a rooster breed a hen to insure a steady supply of fertile eggs? Do the hens have to be bred every day?

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  37. Laura Windham6/26/14, 4:14 PM

    Now, I know what I didn't know. I am most thankful for the play dough project to go with all of the images (yours and my roos). Thank you!

    Ha, I HAD NO IDEA!!!!

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  38. good to know, thanks

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  39. I had no idea about the roos' mating, and it is so darn quick.....wow...Blaze is a rooster,s rooster...what a stud.....thanks for all this great information again...you are one smart chick.

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  40. my rooster is just getting to the age so i was actually wondering all about it lol perfect timing!

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  41. Peggy Schoenbeck Farley6/26/14, 4:21 PM

    I have a new Wild Matador who is very young! The hens put him in his place though, I've seen them get him down on the ground by his comb! He is the one who gets up and shakes it off. LOL

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  42. Thank you for the great info, I always wondered just how it did work!

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  43. Informative as always!

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  44. Very cool

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  45. Is it ok to allow a full size rooster to make with a small SILKIE or frizzle?

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  46. Sandi Bergeron6/26/14, 4:28 PM

    Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom can't beat this segment! Awesome.

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  47. Alan Thomas6/26/14, 4:30 PM

    Would love to win the layer feed

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  48. I have been wondering about how this all works. My flock is 16 weeks old and I have been kind of watching for mating to start but havent caught them in the act yet.

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  49. The frequency of mating isn't as important as fertility of the rooster and the hen. It's just not as simple as "how often."

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  50. just this very morning i found our very first egg :) ... promptly followed by (I think- though i'm hoping not) was our silver sebright crowing :( i posted a short video on your FB page... and was hoping to get your thoughts... so this article came as an "OY VEY" moment for me!

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  51. Debbie Knebel6/26/14, 4:32 PM

    Very informative....thanks for sharing! and thanks to all those that provide goodies for you to pass on!

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  52. DickeyandPam Tinkle6/26/14, 4:32 PM

    You put so much into all you do...thank you!

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  53. Very interesting! We have 13 hens, 1 guinea hen, 1 "full-size" rooster, and 2 Serama roosters. I am excited to learn that the Seramas could successfully fertilize our full-sized hens!

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  54. PiTown Patty6/26/14, 4:40 PM

    I guess it's worked for them for thousands of years...seems pretty difficult to the non-chicken bystander ;p

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  55. I always wondered HOW it was done

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  56. Coley McAvoy6/26/14, 4:41 PM

    That was "hens down" an educational article ... and thank you Caesar for the assist.

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  57. Teresa Parks6/26/14, 4:42 PM

    Thanks for the opertunities to get free things to try.

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  58. Wow! Thanks for the info!! I am trying to figure out all this chicken stuff as I just have got into it. Your site is very helpful! Thank you for your hard work and sharing your knowledge!

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  59. Tanya Naugler6/26/14, 4:44 PM

    Love all your posts! Thank you!

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  60. Wendy Cunningham6/26/14, 4:44 PM

    Interesting!! Thanks for the info! And I loved the Play Dough model!! lol

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  61. Cynthia Peters6/26/14, 4:47 PM

    Love the info...I can tell you love your feathered family!

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  62. Angela Nelson-Patterson6/26/14, 4:49 PM

    I so just learned this. And yes ew...lol. I had wondered but really didnt want to research it. Guess now I know and all I can say is interesting! Thanks for another chance at a giveaway!

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  63. Alicia Cardwell Elam6/26/14, 4:49 PM

    Thanks for all your had work and research. You truly care.

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  64. Shirley Benson6/26/14, 4:53 PM

    Such interesting and educational material. So helpful to newbies, thank you sincerely.

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  65. Susan Fischer6/26/14, 4:54 PM

    Thanks, Kathy for this very informative article. I have noticed one of my hens laying her neck across the back of one of the roosters...always the same one...is this the equivalent of a chicken hug? What does it mean?

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  66. Linda J. Walker6/26/14, 4:55 PM

    everything we wanted to know, but were afraid to ask ;)

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  67. Elaine Beaudoin Nelson6/26/14, 4:57 PM

    would be great to win the bag of scratch and peck feed!

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  68. That is helpful information, thank you for going to the effort to make it precise but simple. Our girls, now 18 weeks are beginning to do a submissive squat. Cheers,
    izzi~avis

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  69. That was very informative. Now I think I can't talk about it at parties..Thank you for the info..

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  70. Jill Merrill Greenwell6/26/14, 5:04 PM

    This is so great!! I have so many people ask if hens need a rooster for egg production. I often wonder if they were paying attention during sex ed ;)

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  71. Deanna Tyner Bartlett6/26/14, 5:04 PM

    Great info!

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  72. Jacqueline Yonke6/26/14, 5:06 PM

    Got more chickens, so I need more feed!

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  73. Our Roo does the wing drop and dance.. Some times it even works for him.. lol

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  74. Shel Reitmajer6/26/14, 5:10 PM

    Hmm. I was wondering why I never saw tab A go into slot B. Thanks for the info!

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  75. Kristina Sawed Off Dunn6/26/14, 5:10 PM

    Great info & thanx for sharing

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  76. Carolle Mallette Cox6/26/14, 5:11 PM

    I believe that was all I will ever need to know about chicken mating! I have to tell you though...my hens often run in front of me and present their backs in that 'submissive squat'. We tell the neighbor's kids they're asking to be petted! Thanks for finding us a GMO-free feed producer!

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  77. This is my favorite blog, and I don't even have chickens (so don't enter me in the contest). I was a farm kid from the Midwest and we had chickens which was a very long time ago. My current neighbor had chickens in pens and they somehow got out and now are spread all over our neighborhood where I live on a small island off the east coast of Puerto Rico. The good thing about the chickens running through my yard is that I was told they eat ticks which we seem to have an unusual amount of. Maybe it is the wild horses that roam the streets too that bring in the ticks. I love your chicken and coffee photos and always look forward to seeing what you have to say next. I am almost 70 and had no idea all this went on right in my yard with the chickens. I never put much thought into chicken sex or any sex for years, but then I have been single for many, many years. After seeing Ceaser's boy parts or papilla I had memories of a boyfriend long ago come back to me. The boyfriend's and Ceaser's parts were about the same size and the act lasted just about as long or should I say lasted just about as shorty? Maybe that is why I have not been very interested in dating for years. I am sure this comment may "shock" some readers. I am a tell-it-like-it-is old girl and love life and laughter. I am going to memorize your post today so I can add interesting conversation to the next girls outing I am on. Thank you for all you are and do. Blessings

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  78. That "lemme show you how to crow" video is hysterical. And yeah, I had no idea the males weren't loaded down with equipment. The way they strut and carry on seems so GOT A BIG OL' PACKAGE FOR YOU, LADIES.

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  79. Dawn Clayton6/26/14, 5:25 PM

    that would be a great prize thank you for the chance

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  80. Becky Wilson Cade6/26/14, 5:27 PM

    This article is perfect timing. I recently acquired 2 roosters because I was tired of "broody breaking" and wanted the hens to be able to sit on some fertile eggs. I'm going to find an article on egg "candleing" and try to figure out how all that works. I would hate for a hen to sit on eggs for 3 weeks, and then nothing happen. Still learning...thanks so much for enlightening all of us!

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  81. Truly am thankful for finding you! Great information!

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  82. Heidi brehm6/26/14, 5:35 PM

    thanks for the giveaway. LOVE scratch and peck!

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  83. Great article! I enjoy all your articles and have learned so much!

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  84. Spring Harris Robinson6/26/14, 5:38 PM

    I love your informative articles,

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  85. I'm sure or ladies would love to give this a try!

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  86. So difficult, yet it actually occurs.... That is how I feel about chicken mating!! Thank you for the information! I may have actually witnessed this occurring without being aware of what was happening. I do not consider myself uninformed, just didn't think it happened that quickly! LOL Thank you again for your insight and sharing such great information!

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  87. Great giveaway and helpful info as we are new to owning a rooster. I feel sorry for my 1 year old hens. This teenage rooster is stalking them. They run him around the yard like, "Yeah right boy! Not here"

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  88. Ranay Hendrickson6/26/14, 5:42 PM

    My girls would love this! I love all the information you have here.

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  89. Ronnie Wilcox6/26/14, 5:48 PM

    My girls would love to win some feed.

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  90. Fascinating, I learn so much from your blog. Thank you.

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  91. Jennifer Hudson-Gensler6/26/14, 5:58 PM

    Great info!

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  92. Sharon Allred Duncan6/26/14, 6:03 PM

    This was informative, inquiring minds want to know how long the sperm remains viable in the hen? Plus I would like to be entered in the giveaway :!

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  93. Great info! Especially love the Playdoh.

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  94. Yes and full sized roosters can sucessfully mate with bantam hens. My rooster (Sweet Pea; a Silkie Marans) wants this naturally free layer seed so he can tidbit the ladies; please send!

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  95. I love Scratch and Peck products!!

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  96. nancy weckbacher6/26/14, 6:08 PM

    I found that very interesting

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  97. Brandy Keyes6/26/14, 6:10 PM

    Very informative

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  98. Caitlyn Ralston6/26/14, 6:12 PM

    Very informative! I would love to win some chicken food too! Thanks for the opportunity!

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  99. Beth Binkerd6/26/14, 6:16 PM

    I always wondered bout how they did it. Lol

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  100. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us.

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  101. Tasha Douda6/26/14, 6:24 PM

    I love learning so much from you!

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  102. Grace Murray6/26/14, 6:25 PM

    I just saw this on Dirty Jobs TV show only with turkeys. Pretty interesting only the turkeys can't do it themselves so they take the sperm and deposit it in the hens. Very dirty job! Lol!

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  103. Well that was educational! And the Play-Doh diagram was skillfully executed :)

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  104. I made it through the chicken porn just to try to win some Scratch and Peck feed for the girls. Just kidding! Thanks for providing all the information we need to know.

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  105. Great post today - learned tons!

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  106. Diana Goetsch6/26/14, 6:50 PM

    I kind of figured that's how they did it! Chickens seem to be more daintier than the ducks about it tho... and I would love to win the layer feed too!

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  107. Rachel Katherine6/26/14, 7:01 PM

    Thanks for the info! [Drawing entry]

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  108. Great pictures and art work. Where do your kids go to school? I want to be there for Show and Tell! The pladoh is terrific. And very informative. :O)

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  109. Jessica Kirk6/26/14, 7:24 PM

    Very interesting, I always wondered how they did the deed lol. I love Scratch and Peck feeds! I am currently using the starter feed for my 5 week old chicks, would be great if I won some layer feed for later!

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  110. I posted this to my wall - I have been getting so many questions about chicken sex since I got my girls!!!

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  111. Seramasoncall6/26/14, 7:39 PM

    Thanks! This was very educational.

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  112. Okay then, can't wait for my next get together to share that info!!! Not, lol. I guess those questions have been answered though.

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  113. Interesting and informative as always! Thank you!!!!

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  114. Hmmm.... I have a few delicate questions: how many times does/can a rooster mate in a day? Does he "visit" one hen more than once a day? Do the hens ever refuse or do they always get into the submissive pose?

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  115. Jennifer Bolea6/26/14, 8:14 PM

    I really need some scratch n peck, my ladies, LOVE it.

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  116. Jennifer Jarman6/26/14, 8:22 PM

    Wow!
    I've always wondered!
    So weird they don't have an actual penis!

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  117. I love this organic feed!

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  118. I would LOVE this bag of feed! <3 organic

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  119. Thanks for telling us about the Birds and the ...well Birds. I want to win a prize!!Any Prize.

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  120. Thanks for the info. I always wondered lol.

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  121. This was helpful information, it always looks so violent to us. Of course this and being told that we do not have enough hens for our two roosters makes a big difference. We continue learning as we go!

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  122. Kathy Musick6/26/14, 8:51 PM

    I can always use layer feed. I don't have a rooster but I can just adore yours. They are a beautiful bird. But my hens are just as pretty.

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  123. I recently started this food. I feel good about it and my pullets like it just fine :)

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  124. Michelle H.6/26/14, 9:08 PM

    Very informative! Thanks for all the great info!

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  125. Monique Watanabe6/26/14, 9:14 PM

    Thanks for such an informative blog. It has been really helpful since I have started raising chickens of my own. Now I know what it takes to make a fertilized egg. Wish the roosters would learn what finesse is

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  126. Wow, that was certainly in the 50 Shades of Gray zone! Lol

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  127. Stephanie Abel6/26/14, 9:23 PM

    I teach this, not quite as detailed, to kindergarten students each spring. It was a good information- albeit- a little too much with the pictures. :) Love this site!

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  128. Rebecca Hieneman6/26/14, 9:44 PM

    Love it!

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  129. Renee Bonneau Sturgis6/26/14, 9:58 PM

    Do you know that non-livestock people actually look at you weird when you start discussing this stuff? Lmao!

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  130. Lisa Steenberg6/26/14, 10:08 PM

    This was one of my favorite articles! I absolutely LOVE the play doh diagram. VERY nice work!!

    Love that scratch and peck is whole foods!!

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  131. Amazing pictures! I can't believe you actually captured his "parts" ! Very informative article.

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  132. That was. Very educational.

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  133. Dennis Doyle6/26/14, 10:24 PM

    cool, I was just thinking of this subject today!
    thanks

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  134. Nana Rominger6/26/14, 10:28 PM

    Have 2 baby roos arriving next month, Bantams. Can they really mate with full standard hens?

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  135. Marilee Hagee6/26/14, 10:41 PM

    Thank you for the giveaway and the great info

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  136. i always wondered how that worked

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  137. One of those kinda wondered but didn't know who to ask Questions. You are amazing and I am so thankful for your blog!
    This giveaway would be wonderful to win. Thank you Kathy!

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  138. Anita Jo Martin Fields6/26/14, 11:24 PM

    You always have good information!

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  139. mary peterson6/26/14, 11:27 PM

    Very interesting article. Things that make you go hmmmm!

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  140. Kelli Smith Allen6/26/14, 11:33 PM

    Would love to try this feed. We can only get it by mail order where we live and it's just too expensive to do that. Thanks for the opportunity to win some. p.s.~ Thanks for enlightening us as well as to the mystery surrounding fertile eggs! =)

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  141. Laura Adrian Smith6/26/14, 11:34 PM

    Great pictures and cool info! thanks!

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  142. Wow--I can't believe the photos you were able to get.

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  143. I remember in high school a senior asking how chickens or birds do the deed being a farm girl it was easy to ex plane....One thing that puzzles me is why some people refuse to eat a fertile egg they always tasted the same to me.... And now some feed please....

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  144. My 4 chickie babies love Scratch and Peck soy/corn free. My pocket would love to get some free. I have been paying $21. just for the shipping! That is just about the price of the feed. We tried another and they did not like it, it didn't ferment as well and was mostly dust. They are happy to get their Scratch and Peck back.Terrific Product!

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  145. Chickens can be artificially inseminated too, Grace. :)

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  146. Tracy Harden6/27/14, 12:48 AM

    Since I don't have any roosters, I haven't seen any of this behavior, except the hen squatting under my hand sometimes. I wondered how they did it though...

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  147. OMG Nancy. I thought that I over-shared! :o

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  148. Check it out and if u like it share it

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUoTKquqiho

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  149. Love this post, i am checking out the feed now to see if i like it or not, i am gonna buy some but i would love to win some more XD.

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  150. Virginia Curtis6/27/14, 3:02 AM

    Would love to try their feed!

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  151. Millicent Fridley6/27/14, 3:45 AM

    I love watching my Roo do his fandango around the hens!

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  152. Andi Williams6/27/14, 5:36 AM

    Thanks for this blog! This city girl had no clue!

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  153. Rosanne Severance Hennesy6/27/14, 8:07 AM

    Very interesting and a little risqué. ; ) Thanks for all your informative blogs. Yes, the girls would love some layer feed.

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  154. Would love to win !!!!!

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  155. You make me miss my roosters, but not enough to aquire more. Very informative blog, as usual!

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  156. I learn so much from you!

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  157. Sonia Rodriguez6/27/14, 9:22 AM

    I love the information. Will silkies tear up thete fluff too mating? Getting some this weekend to just have for pure joy and maybe show. Would like a rooster to breed. Are saddles good for silkies?

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  158. Becky Partan6/27/14, 9:29 AM

    Inquiring minds wanted to know, and you provided the goods. As a newby chicken mama, I was wondering how that all worked, and now I know. Thanks for furthering my education.

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  159. All about the birds and the bees! :-)
    graceinapril@gmail.com

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  160. Great explanations, loved the use of the Play Dough! would love to win some feed, too.We have not tried it yet.

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  161. Wow, amazing photos and great info. No roosters in my future, but good to know how the deed is done. And that Scratch & Peck feed is awesome. My girls love it -- I would love to win a bag. Thanks for making this offer, and as always, I enjoyed your post.

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  162. Katie Mutchler6/27/14, 11:50 AM

    Very funny, I actually just looked this up about a week ago due to a buddy and I arguing about how chickens "do the deed" so it was quite ironic to see this post now!!

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  163. Valerie McNaught Rogers6/27/14, 12:11 PM

    Wow, learn something new everyday!

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  164. Kathi Thompson6/27/14, 12:15 PM

    Always wanting to try new feeds and scratches for my girls! Looks great!

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  165. Cheryl Ortiz6/27/14, 12:37 PM

    yes please.

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  166. Rachael Rose6/27/14, 1:04 PM

    I am always looking for good feed for my ladies. Where I live there aren't many options. I would love to win! So would the girls!

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  167. Well... you had me at "up close and personal photos" but winning the layer feed would be an awesome bonus! <3

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  168. Michele Workman6/27/14, 1:24 PM

    Excellent job writing this! Very informative and you had me laughing out loud with the way you explained everything! This product would be great to try too.

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  169. Michelle Chun6/27/14, 1:26 PM

    I've fed my hens a sample of the Scratch and Peck feed and they absolutely love it.

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  170. Roberta Johnston6/27/14, 3:36 PM

    Would love to feed my new girls some good feed!

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  171. lmurphyinaz6/27/14, 4:42 PM

    I love the info you share and in such an imaginative way. You make me laugh eveery day. Thanks. The feed looks great.

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  172. Terry Crider6/27/14, 6:20 PM

    Would like to win

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  173. Interesting article, thanks!

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  174. Yvonne Ahlquist6/27/14, 8:04 PM

    good info!

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  175. Sex seems to always be a good subject! Great information, thank you!

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  176. I just tell it like it is. I had to check to see if you had deleted my comment. I love your response.

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  177. That was informative! :o)

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  178. It's amazing you ever get chicks!

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  179. I would love to try this scratch

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  180. What a great treat, would love to give this to my girls!

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  181. E Hollandsworth6/28/14, 9:04 AM

    Scratch and peck please!!

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  182. Michelle Terwey6/28/14, 9:07 AM

    That scratch looks very good!

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  183. wow....great post!

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  184. Sally Mills Ross6/28/14, 9:08 AM

    Very informative. Thanks!

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