Jan 9, 2013

Repairing a Chicken's Broken Beak


Chicken with broken beak
Chickens rely upon their beaks as tools to accomplish tasks that hands would serve- if they had them. Chicken beaks they aid in eating, drinking, grasping, exploring, digging, transporting, grooming and communicating. Beak injuries are common and can result from colliding with an object, particularly when the bird is startled, fighting with predators or other chickens and getting the beak stuck in between hard objects such as hardware cloth fencing. The extent of an injury can range from a simple chip to a fracture to a partial or complete removal of the beak from its underlying structures. A significant beak injury can be devastating to a chicken, not only can it be incredibly painful, and the injury can prevent the chicken from eating and drinking normally, endangering its ability to survive. According to Melissa Shapiro, a veterinarian in Westport, Connecticut who owns a mobile veterinary service, “veterinary consultation and care is recommended for all animal medical issues. Some minor cracks can be left alone and they will grow out and be fine, more severe cracks need to be splinted and stabilized to keep the beak in alignment.” Ideally, beak injuries should be treated by a veterinarian, but unfortunately, the poultry veterinarian population has not kept pace with the rise in backyard flocks across the United States, making it necessary for chicken-keepers to be prepared to render first aid to their feathered pets, when needed. 
Broken beak tip on chicken
ABOUT BEAKS:
A normal beak is comprised of two halves; the upper and lower mandibles consist of bones covered by a hard keratin layer, much like human fingernails. The top mandible is slightly longer than the lower mandible and roughly two thirds of the mandibles’ length contains blood vessels and nerves underneath the hard outer layer. This network of nerves and blood supply makes injuries to that portion of the beak especially painful and potentially life-threatening. The end tip of a chicken’s beak contains no blood supply or nerve endings, therefore is not painful when injured or trimmed. An inspection of the inside of the beak reveals where the live tissue ends and the dead portion begins. Chicken beaks continue to grow throughout the bird’s life and require maintenance, just like fingernails. 

Beak Maintenance
We tend not to notice beak growth in a healthy, active, backyard chicken because birds maintain their length and shape by pecking the ground and wiping them on hard or abrasive surfaces such as rocks. Beak wiping serves several other functions as well, including keeping it clean and sharpening it for tasks requiring precision such as preening and picking up insects and small pieces of food.

Chickens confined to a run should be provided with a hard object such as a rock or brick, for honing.  Some beaks grow abnormally for a variety of reasons. These are commonly referred to as crooked, scissor or crossed beaks and a chicken with this condition ordinarily requires assistance maintaining its beak length and shape, as well as accommodations in eating and drinking.  
Scissor-beak, cross-beak chicken
Read about scissor-beaks and how to accommodate these special needs chickens HERE.

I prepare for emergencies in my flock by keeping a well stocked chicken first aid kit. For beak injuries, the following supplies are essential: canine nail clippers, a wound care rinse such as Vetericyn VF hydrogel, (a wound treatment and infection control spray) bloodstop powder, tweezers, a nail file, Superglue gel, cotton swabs, old towels and tea bags (or silk nail wraps for acrylic fingernails). Having the proper supplies ready when a chicken is injured or sick allows me to focus on the chicken and their immediate needs instead of scrambling in a panic to acquire the essential items.  
Chicken First aid kit
BEAK REPAIR SUPPLIES
scissors
superglue gel (gel is less apt to run, I wouldn't want to glue her tongue to her beak!)
forceps or tweezers 
One tea bag (cut in a patch slightly larger than the area of the break)
2 towels
broken beak repair kit
When I discovered one of my pullets with a beak injury earlier this year, I had the necessary supplies ready. BB, whom I so named for this broken beak incident, had torn the tip of her beak diagonally from the front left side over to the right side, and its edges were jagged. The underlying beak tissue was exposed, but not damaged or bleeding, which made repairing the beak a fairly straightforward matter. Had I not noticed the injury when I did, the broken portion would have fallen off with the least bit of pecking, making the highly sensitive exposed tissue vulnerable to further insult and severe pain.  I immediately picked up BB and whisked her into the house to repair her broken beak.
 Holding chicken in a towel helps keep her calm, allowing me to work on her broken beak
With my one free hand, I set my beak repair supplies on the kitchen table. I then wrapped BB in a large towel, burrito-style, with her wings comfortably but securely at her side and her feet covered. This technique keeps a chicken calm while preventing wing flapping in an attempt to flee and injuries to the caregiver from its toenails. The ‘towel burrito’ creates a safer environment to treat the bird. A second, smaller towel was draped loosely over BB’s eyes, which left her nasal passages (nares) free and kept her still. 
chicken's broken beak with repair patch on it
Next, I cleaned the area gently but thoroughly with Vetericyn spray, remembering that the exposed tissue was extremely sensitive. While the area was drying, I emptied the tea bag and cut out a small patch slightly larger than the torn area of the beak. Using tweezers, I placed just enough superglue gel on the patch to moisten it.  I aligned the broken piece into its proper position and placed the glue patch over the crack. It fit like a puzzle piece, leaving no rough or jagged edges. Had any rough edges remained, I would have used a nail file to smooth them. After the first layer of glue dried, I applied a second, very thin layer of glue over the entire patch with a cotton swab and allowed it to dry completely. 
Broken chicken beak repaired with superglue and tea bag patch
broken beak repaired
Chicken's broken beak repaired and as good as new
CAUTIONARY NOTE: Superglue gel should be used sparingly as the fumes can be irritating to birds. The glue should never be allowed to run or drip, especially not into the mouth or the underside of the beak.  Injured beaks that are dirty or infected should never be sealed closed with glue; the contaminated tissue needs to be left exposed for cleaning, draining and monitoring infection.
 Hen returned to the yard after broken beak repair
UPDATE: Four days later, her repair is holding beautifully.
Hen's broken beak, four days after repair
Chicken scratching and pecking with beak after repair
6 weeks after the repair:
Repairing a Chicken's Broken Beak
While I ordinarily keep injured birds separated from the rest of the flock to avoid further injury and picking from other birds, BB’s injury did not involve blood that might draw unwanted attention to it from flock-mates, further, the repair was virtually undetectable, so I felt it safe to return her to the backyard. When the glue was completely dry, I brought BB back outside and she immediately commenced foraging. Over the next several months, I watched her carefully as the cracked area grew out and finally disappeared. BB had managed to hone it without dislodging the patch or re-opening the crack.
 Chick with broken beak tip
I once discovered a three week old Olive Egger hiding in a nest box with the front portion of her upper beak missing. The blood was bright red, which indicated the injury had occurred very recently. There was no debris on the tissue and no apparent injury to the tissue itself, so I immediately applied Vetericyn Wound and Infection hydrogel spray to clean it and kept her apart from the flock for several days until the tissue was no longer reddened and had begun to recede slightly. Throughout that week, I reapplied the wound cleaner three times a day until it healed to my satisfaction. If I had not had Vetericyn, I could have used a diluted povodine-iodine solution (aka: Betadine®) to cleanse the area followed by antibiotic ointment.
 Chick with broken beak tip healing nicely
Beak injuries that are more severe than the ones mentioned in this article may not be capable of repair at home. Cracks or injuries to the live portion of the beak require careful cleaning and infection control as well as bleeding control. Certain antibiotics and anti-inflammatories may be necessary, which can only be prescribed by a veterinarian. When a portion of a beak is missing, pressure should be held on the area to stem blood loss until a veterinarian can be seen. Avian specialists can fashion splints and acrylic beak prosthetics, but this degree of specialty care is unlikely to be either accessible to or feasible for most backyard chicken-keepers. 
Marilyn Monroe, a White Orpington, broke the tip of her beak
Marilyn Monroe (White Orpington hen) broke the tip of her beak. 
It will require filing as the outer edges are sharp.
 Marilyn Monroe, a White Orpington, broke the tip of her beak
Beak shown 4 months after it was broken.

REMINDER: Locate a veterinarian in your area before you need one
It is advisable to locate a veterinarian who will treat chickens before an emergency arises. A visit to his or her office to meet the staff can be the difference between being seen during a crisis and being told the vet has no time to examine a new patient. Have a backup plan, too. Find out who covers for that vet when they are on vacation and keep both phone numbers in your first aid kit. Even if the vet is not a certified poultry veterinarian, many practitioners have some experience with birds or chickens and will agree to help an animal in a life-threatening situation. See a list of board certified avian veterinarians here.

There will inevitably come a time in every flock when a sick or injured bird will need to be euthanized. Some people are capable of euthanizing their own birds by any one of a variety of humane methods. It is a good idea to prepare for the inevitable by learning which methods are available and whether you believe you are capable of following through with one when necessary. Some chicken-keepers will be more comfortable having a professional euthanize their chickens and most vets, even if they do not ordinarily treat chickens, will euthanize a sick or injured bird. Inquire of your dog/cat/goat/horse 's vet whether this is a service they would be willing to render, but do so in advance of the need if possible.

100 comments :

  1. That is great info to know.  You gotta love Super Glue!

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  2. Rachy Thomas1/9/13, 4:53 PM

    Great job!  Thanks for that, really helpful! xxx

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  3. We have a chicken with a crossed beak.  I've tried filing in into a better shape, but it continues to grow crossed. We haven't had the heart to cull her from the flock, but we don't want her to slowly starve either.  She appears to be getting enough food and water.  Is there anything I should try to correct her beak shape?

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  4. superglue gel?   I'll be getting some this weekend, thanks!

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  5. WOW. you learn something new every freaking day. good knowledge, hope not to have to put it into use.

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  6. I will be adding superglue to my chicken kit! BB looks alot like my Delphine, an EE :)

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  7. Good info! This was my mother's exact same method of repairing a broken/split/torn fingernail. :) Glad to know it will work on a chicken's beak, should the need ever arise.

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  8. That was pretty cool! I'm a city girl and never even knew they could break a break never mind that it could also be repaired! Looks like you did a great job! :)

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  9. Wow, I never thought they could break a beak! Great info, every time I have something unusual come up I run for the computer and straight to your blog; ) Thanks

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  10. Natalie Rowe1/9/13, 5:29 PM

    AMazing!! What a great job you did. I'll have to bookmark this for future reference.

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  11. Nancy Roberts1/9/13, 5:43 PM

    Very interesting reading...thanks!  I'm sure this is a relief to a lot of chicken owners who run into this problem. :)

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  12. Patty Beattie1/9/13, 7:08 PM

    That's amazing!  I would not have a clue what to do....but now I do.  Thanks.

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  13. Barbara Falzone1/9/13, 7:33 PM

    Awww poor baby hen!  It is like fixing a broken nail.  xo

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  14. sheryl sicard1/9/13, 7:47 PM

    Thanks for that post, never know when you might have to do beak repairs..LOL i would not have know what to do in such a case,  Thanks

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  15. sydneyrosebud1/9/13, 8:45 PM

    Wow, this is brilliant!  I can't thank you enough for sharing your knowledge.  I have three pet hens and love them to pieces!  Our Buff Orpington has been a bit under the weather, and we've had to syringe feed her for the past 7 months or so.  She's finally doing better.  
    I really look forward to reading more of your blog!  Thank you!

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  16. Been keeping chickens for 40 years, and yet I never fail to learn something from you!  You are a very good teacher of useful information.

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  17. Thank You again for preparing me if the time comes! 

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  18. Mona Schmitt1/10/13, 11:12 AM

    You are amazing!  I had no idea you could do something like that!  I don't have any chickens, but found it fascinating nonetheless.  Have a wonderful day!

    Mona

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  19. You are such a good mommie!  I love her coloring...beautiful grey!

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  20. Wow, that was quick thinking, and what an awesome job you did! You must get your nails done regularly to even think of that! I am so impressed with all I learn from your blog - being a first year chicken keeper, it has been a life line
    Thank you!

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  21. great blog as always!  Are you planning at any time to put all these great tips into a book?  It would be so nice to be able to have them right at hand in an emergency and you don't want to waste time looking them up on the computer!  Think about it plz!  I am sure I am not the only one who would gratefully pay for such a great reference.

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  22. Oh Kathy, what a job well done. I am keeping this post for future reference in case I have this happen to any of my girls. (meaning my hens of course!) You seemed so calm through the ordeal too. wow, good job . Easy to follow instructions too, thanks, Anna

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  23. OK, I'm officially impressed! I have saved a chicken from egg binding, but this delicate operation looks more difficult! Brava! And what a beautiful hen. My homemade hybrids are my prettiest birds, none prettier than my rooster.

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  24. Amazing! Great job!

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  25. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:25 PM

    Thanks. :)

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  26. joely pentlow1/10/13, 9:40 PM

    That's incredible!  I once had a hen with a small split across the beak.  It wasn't jagged and caused no problems for her and eventually, it grew out.  If it happens to a worse degree on a future hen, I now know what to do.  Thank you!

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  27. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:43 PM

    This was actually a very simple fix, Jeanmarie. Saving an eggbound hen is something worth crowing about! Well done!

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  28. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:44 PM

    Thanks Anna. :)

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  29. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:44 PM

    Thanks for the vote of confidence, Victoria. ♥

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  30. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:46 PM

    LOL! I have been doing my own nails since I was in junior high school, Susie. Who knew the skills would come in handy keeping chickens?! :)

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  31. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:46 PM

    I think she's really neat too, Karen. Thanks. :)

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  32. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:47 PM

    Thanks so much for your lovely comment, Mona. It's nice to have you here, particularly knowing that you don't have chickens. ♥

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  33. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:50 PM

    My pleasure, Christy! :)

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  34. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:51 PM

    That is the ultimate compliment, Dorothy. Thank you. ♥

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  35. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:56 PM

    Wow, what an amazing chicken mama you are for hand-feeding her for so long. ♥

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  36. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:58 PM

    Eggsactly, Barbara!

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  37. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:59 PM

    My pleasure, Patty. Thank BB for the opportunity to illustrate the technique. LOL!

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  38. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 10:01 PM

    Thanks Natalie! :)

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  39. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 10:03 PM

    That's so nice of you to say, Sandy. Thank you for the vote of confidence. ♥

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  40. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 10:03 PM

    That's what I USED to use this technique for, Elizabeth! LOL

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  41. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 10:04 PM

    Thanks Martha. :)

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  42. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 10:06 PM

    There is nothing you can do to straighten out the beak, Miranda. They are like fingernails and continue to grow. The best you can do it keep it trimmed and filed to a reasonable length. More about how to help a hen with scissor beak on my post here: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/03/scissor-beak-aka-crossed-beak-what-it.html

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  43. winnie rottem1/12/13, 4:48 PM

    Wonderful job, but what I keep seeing is the love that you have for these chicken and that is what really beautiful

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  44. Debi Bolocofsky1/13/13, 2:13 PM

    OMG Kathy,
    She is so sweet.  How great that was to see.  I know nothing about chickens, so this was interesting also.  Thanks so much for sharing at Wednesday's Adorned From Above Blog Hop. 
    Debi and Charly @ Adorned From Above
    Melanie @ Keep It Simple and Fun

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  45. can I just say, I don't have chickens. I would love them for eggs, but anyway. I love your blog! it's so informative and just beautiful!

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  46. TheChickenChick1/15/13, 10:57 PM

    Thank you, Katherine, that is so nice to hear, particularly coming from someone who does not have chickens. ♥

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  47. I used to be able to find good information from your
    content.

    my blog performance upgrades

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  48. Those chooks of yours are so lucky to have a caring Momma like you!

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  49. i have a hen named Crookshank shes a rhody, she is from the feed store and i never knew she had a crooked beak till she turned about 7=8 months old, surprised me she seemed to be the happiest of the hens, i let her be but soon enough i had to trim her beak down to keep bacteria away and from her tongue drying out, its getting better but its still crossed, im hoping regular trims and file sessions will shape her beak at least, what do you think?

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  50. TheChickenChick3/27/13, 11:43 PM

    Thanks Rick. :)

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  51. TheChickenChick3/27/13, 11:44 PM

    It will never grow normally, but the trims and filing will definitely help her.

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  52. I've been reading up on your blog in preparation to getting a small flock and I very much appreciate your detailed posts and pictures! Would a coffee filter have worked in place of a tea bag for mending a broken beak like BBs? Thanks!

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  53. TheChickenChick4/7/13, 11:29 PM

    I'm sure it would, Elizabeth. Any port in a storm!

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  54. Nice Article. So, what would you suggest doing with the following hen? I picked her up at an auction and did not notice till after I got her home that she had a split beak.



    Thanks,


    Mike-

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  55. TheChickenChick4/16/13, 12:45 AM

    This should give you some ideas about helping her, Mike: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/03/scissor-beak-aka-crossed-beak-what-it.html

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  56. Wow! That's great that she's better. One of my 3 month old girls had the tip of her upper beak pecked off. Should I remove the agressor for a day or remove the now frightened hurt chicken?

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  57. Erica Revak6/29/13, 9:22 AM

    Thanks Kathy!

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  58. Terri Nichols7/4/13, 12:04 AM

    Do I need to trim or file my hen's beaks if they are getting very long and curved to prevent them from breaking it like this? I have one little 5 month old bantam cochin whose top part of her beak is looking longer and curved more than the other girls... or should I just leave her alone and keep an eye on it?

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  59. Brilliant post! We have not yet encountered any of these possible issues, but I thank you for the info in the case we run into challenges in the future!

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  60. Her name should be triple B, because she is so beautiful.

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  61. TheChickenChick7/4/13, 12:35 PM

    I'd leave it unless it appears that she cannot peck normally and pick things up with it. Make sure she has something hard to hone it on, such as a concrete paver or rock, and she should be able to manage the length herself.

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  62. Denise Rhodes7/5/13, 8:03 AM

    Thank you so much for all of your help!! I will go out this week and purchase a first aid kit for my chickens. I Love reading all of your information!!!

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  63. TheChickenChick7/6/13, 11:00 PM

    Thanks Denise. :)

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  64. Denise Rhodes7/8/13, 12:25 PM

    I wonder if you can give me any advice on guinea fowl. I just check the nest and found a lot of feathers and 3 broken eggs, I have not seen the female in 2 days. I picked up 4 eggs and brought them in the house and put them under a heat lamp and I don't know what I am doing. I am not sure if these eggs are still alive and how long I should keep them. I just couldn't leave them in case they had a chance.

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  65. TheChickenChick7/8/13, 10:47 PM

    I have never hatched guinea fowl eggs, but it seems fairly unlikely that a heat lamp would work. If you have another hen you can put them under, that would be a better idea.

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  66. Thanks for the info!! I found my easter egger last night and the end of the beak was hanging by a thread. There was no way to re-attach and it was hindering her drinking ability, so I removed it and cleaned the wound with betadine and triple antibiotic as your post suggests. This morning there was slightly fresh red dried blood on it so I repeated the clean and applied triple. When will I know that she is in the clear of fear of infection? How long should I keep applying betadine and triple? My other birds aren't bothering her but she seems to be down and is hiding in the corner. I feel so bad!!! Thanks again for your help!

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  67. Debbie Tejada8/9/13, 6:35 PM

    Thanks! One of my girls has an almost identical crack and I was tempted to use silk wrap and brush on superglue that I have for a problem nail, but was afraid the glue would hurt or that I'd be sealing in bacteria. I'm going to use your technique in the morning!

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  68. TheChickenChick8/9/13, 11:09 PM

    Let me know how it goes, Debbie!

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  69. Debbie Tejada8/12/13, 1:36 PM

    Well, as it turns out, the broken part of her beak fell off before I could repair it. It turned out to be a "chip" rather than a chunk of her beak falling off, so it was not as bad as I thought. I'm sure it will be fine, will grow out eventually but I will keep your experience in my mind as it sounds like it's not an uncommon problem.

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  70. hi, from where can i get those supplies?

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  71. Hi Kathy I, rescued a chick that was being attacked by its mom and siblings ,I basically raised her by hand,however her upper beak was damaged and it is severely curved upwards,should I cut it and hope it grows back straight? I try to hand feed it wet oatmeal and kernels as she has trouble picking up her food.
    Thanks
    Luis Willis

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  72. TheChickenChick8/28/13, 10:29 PM

    I'd have to see it. Do you think the base of the beak was damaged and that's why it curls?

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  73. Yes Kathy she was all bloodied near the top of the beak when I got her, I just hope it doesn't fall off altogether..

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  74. Barbara Vargason8/31/13, 9:28 PM

    I have a Barred Rock Hen that was debeaked before I got her. The bottom of her beak has gotten long and is turning up on the outside edges. She cannot pick up food very good. She has lost weight. I trimmed the beak some but wonder if I should do something about the turned up edges? I don't know what to do or how to do it.
    you have great ideas and knowledge. I am brand new to posting but I enjoy reading your posts

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  75. TheChickenChick9/1/13, 12:36 AM

    Barbara, this may help you decide whether to trim it and how you might be able to help her eat: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/03/scissor-beak-aka-crossed-beak-what-it.html

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  76. Barbara Vargason9/1/13, 5:47 PM

    Thank you Kathy, She is doing better with what little I took off. I guess I will try to be brave and take a little more off.

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  77. TheChickenChick9/1/13, 9:08 PM

    Proceed with great caution- look inside her beak to find where the live tissue begins and stop short of trimming before you get there.

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  78. TheChickenChick10/19/13, 9:50 PM

    I hope it works for him too. Best wishes!

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  79. I have a sweet Amerucana who was attacked by a possum, our Rooster came to her aid but not before the possum bit and ripped her upper beak off. I have cleaned it, and put triple antibiotic on it. she is in a small cage safely away from others until i know she is well. Will her beak grow back? It is off all the way back to her face, I had worried that her tongue was gone too but on closer inspection it is intact. Otherwise she is fine just very shock up. I appreciate your information so much. Thanks so much.

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  80. TheChickenChick10/31/13, 10:36 PM

    It depends on how far back it was damaged.

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  81. I have an olive egger named Click. Her upper portion of her beak is shorter than the lower. Up close it looks like it peeled back/chipped/broke like a finger nail. It's not by much but I worry it could get worse. There is not any signs of blood. What should I do?

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  82. TheChickenChick1/8/14, 2:30 PM

    See if this helps, Jess: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/03/scissor-beak-aka-crossed-beak-what-it.html

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  83. more info that I didn't know thank you so much

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  84. Janet Jensen1/26/14, 10:57 PM

    Kathy, you're just awesome!
    I love all your tips.

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  85. TheChickenChick1/26/14, 11:23 PM

    Thanks Janet!

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  86. Jan Durston1/27/14, 9:51 PM

    Your blog is sooooo informative and now. I need that magazine! Love all the pics too

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  87. TheChickenChick1/27/14, 9:56 PM

    Thanks Jan!

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  88. Fantastic info. Thank you!

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  89. Lisa Sutton Killian2/13/14, 7:30 PM

    Your information is wonderful. I love reading it and looking at all the pictures. Thank you so much for being here, I'm so glad I found you.

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  90. TheChickenChick2/13/14, 8:42 PM

    Thank you Lisa, I'm happy to have you here!

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  91. Doreen Lapointe3/12/14, 11:28 AM

    Kathy, is there anything that would realign a crooked beak? Our peeps are a month old and one of the polish breeds just seemed to present with this. While I was busy with the pasty butt (thanks ) I may have overlooked this? Seems to be noticeable only last week, is that possible? She seems to eat just fine. Any help?

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  92. Doreen Lapointe3/12/14, 6:30 PM

    Kathy, is there any way to realign a 4week old chicken's beak? I hadn't noticed it right away, seemed like it happened in the last two weeks. While I was busy with pasty butt, (thanks for that help) the Golden Laced Polish started showing an obviously crooked top beak, it doesn't seem to be a problem eating. Is there something I can do?

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  93. TheChickenChick3/13/14, 9:35 PM

    It CAN sneak up on you, but there is nothing you can do to fix it at home. This article will help you with her: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/03/scissor-beak-aka-crossed-beak-what-it.html

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  94. amber haney6/4/14, 3:57 AM

    My rooster dose Not have a top beak. It is complely gone. What should do? I still have his beak. Its not just the tip. Please help me.

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  95. Pamela Anderson6/9/14, 11:51 AM

    I am learning so much from you. I plan to have chickens in the near future and love that I have access to such wonderful information.

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  96. Kris Nelson6/9/14, 9:35 PM

    This is so informative! Thank you for the information!

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  97. Chris Grohmann6/10/14, 8:42 AM

    My girl "Mike" lost her whole top beak, I hand fed her soft foods, shrimp, tuna, whole grain bread until I felt she could eat on her own. Now, a year later she is thriving, she can't pick up food from the ground, but always comes running to me for her special treats :)

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  98. I have a Cochin Bantam pullet that has what I believe to be eye worm, only the worm did not erupt through the eye as is the norm with that parasite, it came out under the lower beak in the soft tissue there. Subsequently the entire lower beak has fallen off leaving her with a viable upper, and no lower beak at all. We tube feed her and she's doing quite well. Will the lower beak ever grow back? Should we euthanize her? She's a lovely bird, very high quality, and such a sweet pet I hate to have to do that. She comes to the back door several times a day and waits to be fed and watered. Thanks for any advice.

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  99. Michelle Rowell7/24/14, 5:27 PM

    My mom and I have a hen with an extra long upper mandible. We originally thought it was normal rooster trait but upon further research it wasn't and we are sure she is a hen. Is this normal?

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