Nov 9, 2012

Feeding Chickens at Different Ages




Chickens' diets are different at various ages, here's what to feed them at each stage.
Chickens at different stages of development require different feed formulations. Commercially prepared rations are a nutritionally balanced food source; poultry nutritionists formulate feed to ensure that chickens get all the nutrition they need daily, therefore, anything that is added to the diet dilutes the nutrient balance they should be getting daily. Even healthy snacks should only be given in moderation so as not to tip the balance, or scale, too far in any direction.
I strongly recommend against dabbling in assembling homemade feed blends. Imprecise calculations and the wrong ingredients can affect growth in young chickens, egg production in layers and result in negative, long-term health consequences.
I strongly recommend against dabbling in assembling homemade feed blends. Imprecise calculations and the wrong ingredients can affect growth in young chickens, egg production in layers and result in negative, long-term health consequences. "Mixing rations is the most complex aspect of poultry management and isn't something you should undertake if you're just starting out. Ration formulation requires:
  • availability of appropriate feedstuffs
  • analysis of feedstuff composition
  • knowledge of the nutritional needs of chickens
  • ability to mix feed in quantity your flock will use within four weeks."1  Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens, Damerow
The following is intended as a general guideline for feeding commercial ration to laying breeds. The availability of certain feed varies by geographic location, therefore, the manufacturer's recommendations should always be followed.
 Day old chicks need starter feed.
STARTER FEED, Day 1 to 8 weeks (Chicks) 
Day-old chicks through 8 weeks old require starter feed containing 20% protein. Starter feed contains the highest percentage of protein a layer will ever consume, which makes sense given their astronomical rate of growth in the first few months of life.
A mother hen and baby chick each have different nutritional requirements, but accommodations can be made to feed them together.
Starter feed can be purchased in both medicated and unmedicated varieties. Medicated feed contains amprolium, which protects chicks from the progression of coccidiosis, a common and deadly intestinal disease that is spread in fecal matter. Chicks that have received the coccidiosis vaccine should not be fed medicated starter, as the amprolium will render the vaccine useless and the chicks vulnerable to the disease. When purchasing 'vaccinated' chicks, it's important to know which vaccines they received.

I no longer give my baby chicks medicated feed after having learned that it is unnecessary when chicks are being kept in clean, dry conditions with enough space per bird. When conditions become overcrowded, filthy, wet and warm from the heat source, coccidiosis can thrive. These types of unhealthy conditions are significantly less likely to occur with pet chickens than they are with commercial poultry operations, for example. Chickens build up a natural immunity to the organisms that cause coccidiosis with or without medicated starter. Allowing chicks to build up an immunity in clean, dry conditions will serve them well when they are ready to head out to the big kid coop.
 Chickens build up a natural immunity to the organisms that cause coccidiosis with or without starter feed.
 Most new chicken-keepers wonder at what age a chick can be given treats, but there is no specific age at which it is appropriate. Chicks are tiny and treats will replace a percentage of the nutrition in starter ration that their rapidly-growing bodies require. Common sense should be the guide; small, healthy treats on occasion.
Chicks are tiny and treats will replace a percentage of the nutrition in starter ration that their rapidly-growing bodies require. Common sense should be the guide; small, healthy treats on occasion.
I do not consider this pumpkin a small treat,
they were only allowed to eat it for a short period of time.
While starter feed is dissolved by the chick's saliva and needs no help being digested, but treats must be accompanied by grit. The term grit describes hard materials such as sand, dirt or small stones that aid in digestion. Since chickens have no teeth, food not broken down by saliva requires further processing in the gizzard- grit helps pulverize fibrous and large foods. Chickens foraging outside will naturally pick up bits of grit (stones, pebbles, sand) from the ground, those that do not forage outside must have grit supplied to them. If necessary, grit can be supplied in a separate hopper.
 Since chickens have no teeth, food not broken down by saliva requires further processing in the gizzard- grit helps pulverize fibrous and large foods.
GROWER FEED, 8 weeks to 18 weeks (Teenagers)
With its higher protein content, starter ration can rush a young pullet's developing body into egg-laying before it's ready. Adolescent chickens (I call them teenagers) should be provided with grower ration containing 16-18% protein, slightly less than starter.

Layer feed should never be fed to chickens younger than 18 weeks as it contains calcium that can permanently damage the kidneys, cause kidney stones, reduce lifetime egg production and shorten a bird's lifespan. Again, grit should be made available to teenagers that do not foraging outside who consume treats.

 DIY PVC feeder instructions.
Click here for DIY instructions for this feeder.
Layer feed is available in mash, crumble or pellet forms, all of which describe the size of the feed. Mash is the smallest, pellets, the largest. Layer feed contains 16-18% protein and has added calcium, which is necessary for eggshell production.
LAYER FEED, 18 weeks and older (The Big Girls)
Layer feed is available in mash, crumble or pellet forms, all of which describe the size of the feed. Mash is the smallest, pellets, the largest. Layer feed contains 16-18% protein and has added calcium, which is necessary for eggshell production.  Laying hens can be fed layer ration as early as 18 weeks or as late as the arrival of their first egg, but should not be fed to birds younger than 18 weeks old.
 While layer feed contains calcium, an additional source of calcium, such as crushed oyster shells or clean eggshells, should be made available to laying hens in a separate dish, apart from the feed.
While layer feed contains calcium, an additional source of calcium, such as crushed oyster shells or clean eggshells, should be made available to laying hens in a separate dish, apart from the feed. All laying hens have different calcium requirements and will consume as much calcium as they need. Oyster shells should never be added directly to feed because excess calcium can be detrimental chickens. 

Hens deprived of adequate amounts of calcium will utilize the calcium stored within their own bones to produce eggshells, which is unhealthy for them.
 Commercial layer feed provides all of the daily nutritional elements a chicken requires. Providing snacks, treats or table scraps in addition to feed interferes with that balanced diet to a degree, depending on the type of treat and amount consumed.
LIMIT TREATS
Commercial layer feed provides all of the daily nutritional elements a chicken requires. Providing snacks, treats or table scraps in addition to feed interferes with that balanced diet to a degree, depending on the type of treat and amount consumed. Limiting snacks and treats, even healthy choices such as mealworms, homemade flock block substitute and pumpkin/pumpkin seeds, ensures that flock members are getting everything they need and avoids problems such as obesity, feather picking, egg binding and reduced egg production.
Chicken scratch is NOT chicken feed. The contents of scratch varies by country and region, but it consists primarily of cracked corn and any number of other grains. It's a source of energy (think: carbs) but is not a good source of vitamins, minerals or protein.

SCRATCH
Chicken scratch is NOT chicken feed. The contents of scratch varies by country and region, but it consists primarily of cracked corn and any number of other grains. It's a source of energy (think: carbs) but is not a good source of vitamins, minerals or protein. "Scratch should be fed sparingly, if at all." 2  In cold weather, chickens expend extra energy to keep warm and a small amount of scratch just before dusk is a decent source of energy at that time of year, but too much can contribute to obesity and obesity-related deaths. Brooding hens will also benefit from the extra calories in scratch.
(gratuitous scratch frenzy video) 
FEEDING DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS TOGETHER
Given the power and force of chicken math, chickens of mixed age groups often occupy the same living space at any given time, which raises the dilemma of feeding each properly. This situation isn't ideal, but it's not unique either.  Providing unmedicated starter/grower to a flock of mixed age birds with calcium available free-choice (in a separate dish) is the best solution. The additional protein in the starter/grower ration won't hurt the older birds, but the calcium in layer feed can damage the kidneys of growing birds.
chickens of mixed age groups often occupy the same living space at any given time, which raises the dilemma of feeding each properly.
FREE FEEDING vs. RESTRICTED FEEDING
A free-feed dining option is the most common in backyard flocks, one in which chickens eat in small increments at their leisure throughout the day. Chickens have a unique digestive system that can accommodate only a small amount of food at a time in their crops.  The feeder supplied to these chickens need accommodate only a few birds at a time. Alternatively, with a restricted feeding schedule, chickens are fed at specific intervals during the day, which requires all birds to have access to a portion of a feeder simultaneously so that birds lower in the pecking order are not deprived of food. Restricted feeding generally requires the use of several feeders even in a small flock and should not be employed without a good reason for doing so and a clear understanding of the purpose of restricted feeding.
White Crested Blue Polish chick.
Sources and further reading:
1 Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens, Damerow, Gail. Storey Publishing, 1995, pg. 49.
2 The Chicken Encyclopedia, Damerow, Gail. Storey Publishing, 2012. pg. 235
Disclaimer, The Chicken Chick
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

288 comments :

  1. Sharon Lee Bense11/9/12, 4:47 PM

    My chickens are 19 weeks and are not laying eggs yet, but from your blog it's ok to start feeing them layer feed? I need to get feed this weeknd so I'll start them on Layer. I don't know if they will start laying soon because of the short days. I was giving them supplemental light but then the hurricane hit. We had no power for 1 1/2 weeks and I heard it's not going to matter anymore to give them additional light. Thanks for your helpful information. I always look forward to your posts.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very good and thorough post! We've always kept our chicks separated until they go on layer feed anyway, but next spring if a hen goes broody we may let her hatch out some eggs and this will help if they are mixed with the other chickens. Thanks for enlightening me! :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. How often to give the oyster shell grit to penned chicks on feed, treats of garden weeds & kitchen scraps.....8 heirloom chics, hatched 1st week of April.

    Thanks.

    Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

    ReplyDelete
  4. Marci Vaughn11/9/12, 5:54 PM

    Great tips!  Thank you!  I especially like the photo of the chicken with a grape!  Too funny!  -Marci @ Stone Cottage Adventures

    ReplyDelete
  5. TheChickenChick11/9/12, 9:52 PM

    My pleasure, Marci and thanks for stopping in!

    ReplyDelete
  6. TheChickenChick11/9/12, 9:53 PM

    Thanks so much, I hope it helps!

    ReplyDelete
  7. TheChickenChick11/9/12, 9:55 PM

    It is fine to start them on layer ration at 19 weeks, Sharon. It has been my experience that new layers that were hatched in the summer begin laying "on time" in the same way spring chickens do. There is no harm in providing them with supplemental lighting whatsoever.

    ReplyDelete
  8. TheChickenChick11/9/12, 9:57 PM

    Hi Tara. When hens begin eating layer feed (any time after 18 weeks of age) they should be provided with oyster shell free-choice (in a separate dish, not mixed into the feed). It should remain available to them 24/7 so they may eat it when they feel their bodies need it.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Interesting read, though I had the most fun with your pictures!
     

    ReplyDelete
  10. TheChickenChick11/10/12, 11:50 PM

    Thanks, I put as much effort into those as I do the article. ;)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Very interesting about the different feeds for the different ages. I knew about chick starter. My question is can I give the older chickens weeds every day that I pull up ? These are weeds out of the garden?  Thanks Ellen from Georgia

    ReplyDelete
  12. Is it okay to give the chickens pulled weeds from the garden every day?  Thanks Ellen from Georgia

    ReplyDelete
  13. TheChickenChick11/11/12, 12:44 PM

    Absolutely! They'll love them!

    ReplyDelete
  14.  I have a question. You recommended against mixing your own feed, and only using commercial feeds. What if you are trying to avoid feeding the GMO corn, etc. that is in commercial feeds?  My birds give me eggs as well as meat, and I don't want them, or us, to be consuming GMOs. Do you know of a commercial feed that does not use GMOs? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  15. Nice post!  Thank you so much again for join up to the blog hop this week.  

    ReplyDelete
  16. TheChickenChick11/19/12, 9:16 AM

    Thanks Melissa. ☺

    ReplyDelete
  17. Karen Phillips11/20/12, 10:08 PM

    Thank you so much for this information. I am a new chicken keeper (this past spring and then doubled our flock this fall) and kept getting differing answers when I asked this question at the feed store. Thanks for clarifying! 

    ReplyDelete
  18. TheChickenChick11/20/12, 10:15 PM

    Happy to help, Karen! Thanks. :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. TheChickenChick11/20/12, 11:42 PM

    Congratulations Karen, you have won the Feed Bag Stocking giveaway! Please email me with your address and I'll get them right out to you!
    Kathy@The-Chicken-Chick.com

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks for the helpful information. It can be tough to feed a flock of varying ages.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Martha Latta12/4/12, 7:09 PM

    Thanks for all the info in this post. Wow! I think I might give too many treats, but my chickens aren't fat and all but 1 lay really well. Between 4 they get about 2 small handfuls of corn a day and a scoop of layer feed. Sometimes they get spent grain from brewing and other times sunflower seeds. They didn't care much for the pumpkin "pie" recipe from this site.

    ReplyDelete
  22. We use Nutrena for all stages/ My crew is healthy and happy. I would like to start making my own feed as one more attempt at being self sufficient.

    ReplyDelete
  23. thanks so much , Melissa

    ReplyDelete
  24. Nutrena Feed is our feed of choice for all stages and ages of our flock here at Miller Family Poultry in Indiana. Thank you the info...always appreciated!

    ReplyDelete
  25. Jessica Stegman12/4/12, 7:13 PM

    I love your blog, been subscribed for many months! Thanks for all the awesome info you provide, especially to novice chicken owners like myself. Your entire blog has been a huge help since day 1!

    ReplyDelete
  26. Wow, a bag of feed would be really great.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Sarah Eller12/4/12, 7:14 PM

    Thank you for another great giveaway! Gl everyone!

    ReplyDelete
  28. I love your site.  We have chickens a year old March 27.  Love seeing all the pictures and information is very helpful!

    ReplyDelete
  29. Thanks for the info. One  question though, All my chickens run together and I'd like to worm the little ones. How long after the 24 hours of wormer in the water do I toss the eggs of the ladies?

    ReplyDelete
  30. TheChickenChick12/4/12, 7:26 PM

    Do your chickens have worms? Worming is extremely hard on their systems and shouldn't be undertaken lightly.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Love your giveaways! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  32. As always, you enlighten me with your information. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Once again you enlighten me with great information! Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Karen Phillips12/4/12, 7:40 PM

    I'm already a subscriber, and I learn more about chicken keeping from your blog than any other source.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I'm.always learning something new from your blogs :-) thank you for sharing your experience & your cute flock with us!

    ReplyDelete
  36. Sandy Abell12/4/12, 7:50 PM

    Good info, thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  37. Thank you again for this! Please enter me for the giveaway.
    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  38. Sarah Kline12/4/12, 8:31 PM

    My girls LOVE Nutrena Nature Wise Layer feed! Thanks for sharing all of your chicken wisdom with us!

    ReplyDelete
  39. Rachel Dennis12/4/12, 8:43 PM

    Thank you for all the info. Nutrena Feed is one of the brands I've wanted to try for your chickens to see how much better it helps our girls out. 

    ReplyDelete
  40. Excellent information as always. Thanks for sharing your knowledge!

    ReplyDelete
  41. Thanks for the info - and the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  42. joely pentlow12/4/12, 9:32 PM

    Great information.  It can be confusing on which type of food to buy and why.  A hen breeder friend once showed me the reason not to give too many treats.  She had a chubby chicken staying with her on a careful diet as the poor thing could hardly stand it was so over weight, the owner had been over giving the treats. She said it's like giving sweets to children, you would not keep feeding them candy would you? I knew then not to over do the treats!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Christina Fisher12/4/12, 9:34 PM

    Please enter me in the contest............

    ReplyDelete
  44. Thanks for the information! I love your blog, my boyfriend and I are researching everything about chickens, as he is going to be building me our first coop and we will be getting some chicks soon :] 

    ReplyDelete
  45. Have 45 chickens...could always use food!

    ReplyDelete
  46. I  did not know what ages to start feeding chickens new thing and now i know thank you

    ReplyDelete
  47. Thanks for all the information you give us with your post. I read all you write and save them for future use. Now I know how and what to feed my babies and teenagers
    Cathy Steen

    ReplyDelete
  48. Hi Kathy. I'm taking notes,  bought a 1588 w/turner from Black Astralorp Friday specials and set 18 eggs from my own flock tonight. Going to farm supply tomorrow to get light bulb, chick starter, etc. PS. the bumblefoot article and the Veterycyn Gel is a lifesaver!!! Even for cat abcesses! Love ya. Kat

    ReplyDelete
  49. Your blog is always good reading. Most always it's new info for me since I am a new chicken Mom as of this past May. Always learning something new.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Great info. I can't wait to win a free bag! :)

    ReplyDelete
  51. I always enjoy your articles!  :-)  crtrlovr

    ReplyDelete
  52. Julie Britton12/5/12, 12:28 AM

    Good information!  We just received a new flock yesterday so it was a good review. We haven't had peeps for 3 years.  

    ReplyDelete
  53. Lisa Taylor12/5/12, 7:26 AM

    Thanks for the info!  I follow you on facebook and your blog!

    ReplyDelete
  54. I would love to win a bag of starter feed for my new chicken adventure.

    ReplyDelete
  55. I have only given my girls a couple handfulls of scratch before I lock them in for the night.  Should I be adding grit with the scratch to help them digest it?  They are about 8 months old.

    ReplyDelete
  56. Kaye Carter12/5/12, 2:08 PM

    I have joined the group.  Fascinating reading and learn alot that I did not know Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  57. Kaye Carter12/5/12, 2:10 PM

    My ladies have stopped laying...they don't seem to be in molt, and I do have some 7 month old little girls that are not laying yet...do you think one of the younger ones are eating my eggs?  I can not find any sign of that and left a store bought white egg in the laying box.  That egg was still there the next morning...any idea???

    ReplyDelete
  58. Great blog! I'm also following on facebook. I'd LOVE to win a bag of feed!

    ReplyDelete
  59. Just some chicks yesterday thanks for all the great advice!

    ReplyDelete
  60. Heather Schleifer12/5/12, 7:46 PM

    What beautiful birds, thanks for the eye candy!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  61. wendy kelly12/5/12, 7:51 PM

     This is some great information. Thankyou so much. Please enter me in the food giveaway.

    ReplyDelete
  62. Julie Britton12/5/12, 7:58 PM

    Came back to check to make sure I commented but don't see my comment!  I always enjoy your posts and this one was a great refresher as we just got some new peeps.

    ReplyDelete
  63. I look forward to receiving notices of your new posts.  What I've read so far is great!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Thank you for the wonderful information.  I learned something new today.  

    ReplyDelete
  65. I would love to try a bag of NatureWise with the girls that have seemed to have become bored with their feed.  I wish it was a little easier to find around here. 

    ReplyDelete
  66. Great info loved it. I think everyone can learn from this even the people who have been doing it for awhile. Like i have always let my silkies brood there babies with the rest of the flock and have done the starter with a side of oyster shell for those that want it but never thought about protein. Thanks for the idea. =D

    ReplyDelete
  67. I would love to try a bag of NatureWise with the girls that have seemed to become bored with their feed. Wish it was a little easier to find around here. 

    ReplyDelete
  68. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:17 PM

    My pleasure, Beth. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  69. fieldofgreens12/5/12, 8:17 PM

    Thanks for your most awesome blog!

    ReplyDelete
  70. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:18 PM

    Sometimes all you have to do is ask the feed store manager and they'll order it in for you.

    ReplyDelete
  71. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:18 PM

    Thanks John. :)

    ReplyDelete
  72. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:21 PM

    My pleasure. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  73. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:22 PM

    Thank you for your most awesome comment! :)

    ReplyDelete
  74. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:22 PM

    Thank you Heather. :)

    ReplyDelete
  75. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:23 PM

    Congratulations Christy!!

    ReplyDelete
  76. This is an amazing website. I never seen this before it just so interesting with all the different types of information you have for everything someone needs.

    ReplyDelete
  77. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:25 PM

    Thanks Carlos! It's nice to have you here. :)

    ReplyDelete
  78. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 8:26 PM

    Thanks Stephanie and good luck in the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  79. Kathy, I love the the way you write. It always is easy to read and very informative.

    Bill "Bubba" Jewett

    ReplyDelete
  80. Even though I have had some chickens for about 20 years, I am just now interested in hatching.  I'm actually getting an incubator for Christmas!  Having a bag of feed, regardless of what stage, would be a really nice thing to have on hand!

    ReplyDelete
  81. You are like a chicken encyclopedia, cool. I'm curious, How long have you been in the chicken world? We had backyard chickens as a kid and now having my own, chicken love has been renewed. Lol
    My hungry girls would love a free bag of feed ;)
    Dennis Burme

    ReplyDelete
  82. You are like a chicken encyclopedia, cool. I'm curious, How long have you been in the chicken world? We had backyard chickens as a kid and now having my own, chicken love has been renewed. Lol
    My hungry girls would love a free bag of feed ;)
    Dennis Burme

    ReplyDelete
  83. I believe my hens get the majority of their calcium from the grass in my yard. I try to give them as varied a diet as possible and have found that they just love canned cat food with salmon or fish but that is just too pricey to give them routinely.  I would love to win some Nutrena just to see how my girls like it as I mostly give them Audabon wild bird seed from KMART or some wild bird seed from Petco.

    ReplyDelete
  84. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:31 PM

    Earl, bird seed is not adequate nutrition for laying hens, which is why we feed them layer rations. I strongly encourage you to research the subject further as your hens' health is at stake.

    ReplyDelete
  85. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:32 PM

    Thanks Melissa!

    ReplyDelete
  86. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:32 PM

    That is SO exciting, Lynn! Merry Christmas to you!

    ReplyDelete
  87. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:42 PM

    Egg eating is certainly a possibility, but unless you find evidence of it, such as a mess on the bottom of the nest box, it's not the first thing I would think of. Many things could be the cause, including decreased daylight at this time of year, disesease, parasites, worms, etc. Check out my blog post on supplemental lightting, that's where I'd begin as it's the most likely cause.

    ReplyDelete
  88. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:43 PM

    If your chickens have access to dirt outside they do not need additional grit.

    ReplyDelete
  89. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:45 PM

    Very exciting, congratulations on your new flock Julie!

    ReplyDelete
  90. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:50 PM

    I like the optimism, Amanda! :)

    ReplyDelete
  91. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:51 PM

    Good for you, Melissa! You're going to have a blast with them!

    ReplyDelete
  92. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:53 PM

    If you can swing it, the Brinsea EcoGlow Brooder is infinitely safer than any heat lamp. http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/02/brooder-safety-fear-heat-lamp.html I will never brood baby chicks under a heat lamp again given the danger to property and lives. Makes me shudder to think that I used to use them. Be safe!

    ReplyDelete
  93. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:56 PM

    Good for you, Gwen! How nice of your BF to build you a coop! The best investment you can make in your chicks and your own safety is an EcoGlow Brooder from Brinsea; more info on that here: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/02/brooder-safety-fear-heat-lamp.html

    ReplyDelete
  94. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:57 PM

    You've got a smart friend, Joely; glad she shared her knowledge with you about treats. Lots of people have no idea an it causes lots of health problems for chickens.

    ReplyDelete
  95. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:58 PM

    My pleasure. Thank you Angel!

    ReplyDelete
  96. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:58 PM

    Thanks Rachel and good luck in the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  97. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:59 PM

    Wow, that's really nice of you to say Karen, thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  98. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:59 PM

    My pleasure!

    ReplyDelete
  99. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 9:59 PM

    Thank you Deborah, happy to help!

    ReplyDelete
  100. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 10:00 PM

    Thanks Tammie!

    ReplyDelete
  101. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 10:00 PM

    Thanks Jessica, that's so nice to know. ♥

    ReplyDelete
  102. Great info count me in!!

    ReplyDelete
  103. I already subscribe to your always informative blog, hope I can still enter

    ReplyDelete
  104. I already subscribe to your always informative blog, hope I can still enter

    ReplyDelete
  105. My girls are almost all laying right now. Their favorite food is the Nutrena brand food. If they're happy I'm happy!

    ReplyDelete
  106. Love the bloc and info!!! Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  107. I would love it if I won a bag of Nutrena. Always wanted to try it.

    ReplyDelete
  108. thanks for all the great info !

    ReplyDelete
  109. My girls would LOVE a free bag of food!  They love eating!  :-)  

    ReplyDelete
  110. Thank you for all the great info!!

    ReplyDelete
  111. I just bought a bag of feed today, but that will only last my 12 girls about a week and a half.  Love the chance to win a free one!
    Linda

    ReplyDelete
  112. I was wondering how to feed a mixed age flock.  Thanks
    Theresa Hennessey

    ReplyDelete
  113. Lots of good info and pictures. Enjoy very much and appreciate your hard work. I love Nutrena feeds and use them all the time

    ReplyDelete
  114. I enjoy reading all of your info and looking at pictures of chickens. I love Nutrena feeds and use them all time.

    ReplyDelete
  115. Im addicted. :)  Thank you for all the valuable information!

    ReplyDelete
  116. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 5:36 AM

    What's your addiction to, Jenifer?

    ReplyDelete
  117. Thanks for all of your informative articles.  And the fun ones too!

    ReplyDelete
  118. Jackie Johnson12/7/12, 5:36 AM

    My girls love the Country Feed for Layers!

    ReplyDelete
  119. Nutrena is the only feed I use to feed my chickens and horses.  I would love to win a bag of Nutrena Laying Crumbles for my flock!!!

    ReplyDelete
  120. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 5:36 AM

    You mean they're not ALL fun, Tim? lol ;)

    ReplyDelete
  121. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 5:36 AM

    You're IN, Angie!

    ReplyDelete
  122. Eggs due to hatch in 10 days!  A bag of feed would be extremely nice!!  Please and thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  123. I love this site!

    ReplyDelete
  124. Thank for all your wonderful pictures and information it is so helpful for us just starting out

    ReplyDelete
  125. lola bruesch12/7/12, 5:36 AM

    did not know there were so many  kinds of feed  it is nice to have these blogs to keep us up on things   your chickens are  beautiful mine will be here in weeks sure am axcited

    ReplyDelete
  126. fitnesserin12/7/12, 5:36 AM

    In our area, much of the starter is starter-grower.  What is the advantage/ disadvantage of this, and should we be supplementing with an addition commercial feed or supplement to get the best results?

    ReplyDelete
  127. Awesome article as usual.  I haven't used Nutrena before, but I'm sure my layers would appreciate a bag....me too!  lol

    ReplyDelete
  128. Awesome article as usual.  I've never used Nutrena, but I'm sure my layers would like to give it a try...me too!  lol

    ReplyDelete
  129. It's my kindda food. I travel quite a distance to buy this feed. I know what I want and I will travel for it.  My girlies are worth it.

    ReplyDelete
  130. Sarah Eller12/7/12, 6:47 AM

    Great read. I like how you put this info out there. So many people just don't realise this importance.

    ReplyDelete
  131. I love your daily postings and your informative and interesting articles are always right on time. Thanks so much!! Neutrena is always a good product and a free bag would be great.

    ReplyDelete
  132. It would be a great start for my return to a backyardagain life, Finger's crossed this end..

    ReplyDelete
  133. Time to plan my backyard flocks again, Need all the help I can Get. I am a disabled Veteran living off disability so I'm sure you can read between the lines

    ReplyDelete
  134. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 7:45 PM

    Thanks Dana!

    ReplyDelete
  135. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 7:45 PM

    Thanks Sarah. :)

    ReplyDelete
  136. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 7:46 PM

    Thanks Tina!

    ReplyDelete
  137. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 7:48 PM

    Thank you Lola. Enjoy your new babies!

    ReplyDelete
  138. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 7:48 PM

    My pleasure Denise, thanks for saying so. :)

    ReplyDelete
  139. TheChickenChick12/7/12, 7:48 PM

    Thanks very much!

    ReplyDelete
  140. Dusty DeLaura12/11/12, 7:48 AM

    Great read. Backyard flocks have been our obsession for the last couple years. At one point we were getting 35 eggs a day, and we would share with our neighbors who were on limited income.

    ReplyDelete
  141. TheChickenChick12/19/12, 10:22 PM

    Thanks Dusty. That's wonderful that you were able to share your bounty with others.

    ReplyDelete
  142. Your information os the best on the web.

    ReplyDelete
  143. New to this site, but excited to read more!

    ReplyDelete
  144. I did all of the above. Would love to win some feed! We are picking up our first chicks next week.

    ReplyDelete
  145. I would love to win a bag, save a bit at the feed store!

    ReplyDelete
  146. I have been following your blog for awhile and ILiked Nutrea. I would love a chance to win this giveaway
    Lisa Swift

    ReplyDelete
  147. cindy bowman2/16/13, 9:44 PM

    Love your information. Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  148. My name is Fluffy I would love to win some feed for me and the other hens in my coop.

    ReplyDelete
  149. I wanna win! Lol

    ReplyDelete
  150. Kathy, I have done all three.  As always, thank you for the article. 

    ReplyDelete
  151. Christine Voight2/17/13, 3:14 PM

    Your blogs contains a lot of valuable information.  I learned so much about caring for my flock of 18 from reading your posts.  Keep up the good work!

    ReplyDelete
  152. We live in NH, where winter temps are, um, anything but balmy.  Today wind chill factors are putting us down into single digits.  The guideline we've been given for an appropriate amount of scratch is whatever the birds can finish off in 5 - 15 minutes.   On a day like this, I give them about 5-10 minutes worth first thing in teh morning, then again later in the day.  What do you think?

    ReplyDelete
  153. Great info.  Looks like I will be making a trip to the feed store today.

    ReplyDelete
  154. We are getting baby chicks in March! We can't wait. We had chickens a few years ago but they all got plucked off by night prowlers. We will be more careful this time and make sure they are in by dusk and have a caged area to roam in during the day. Love that I found your blog. We will need all the help we can get with raising our chicks!! 

    ReplyDelete
  155. Always love reading your blog, full of very helpful information. If we are ever at a loss at what to do or what our next step should be, this is right where we come. You do a FANTASTIC job.  THANK YOU!!

    ReplyDelete
  156. Great info.  Looks like I will be making a trip to the feed store. 

    ReplyDelete
  157. Don't have anyone close to sell that feed and i plan to be more involved with what is being feed to the chickens. This would give me a great start on a healthy flock

    ReplyDelete
  158. Sharon Lee Bense2/17/13, 3:16 PM

    I love your blog! Always so informative.

    ReplyDelete
  159. I will be raising a few chicks this spring to replace some grown layers I lost to predators in 2012.  It's been awhile and I just realized I'll need to get another bag of chick starter feed!

    ReplyDelete
  160. DianeStevens2/17/13, 3:17 PM

    love this feed, it's the only one I have fed from day one..they do great on it!

    ReplyDelete
  161. I love your blog, but am still working on following you by email.  Trouble on my end I think.  I have had about 25 chickens the last 10 years and just love them.  Such silly girls.

    ReplyDelete
  162. there be chicks here soon, sure could use this feed

    ReplyDelete
  163. Hoping I win for my neighbors they have chickens and are going through some tough times. 

    ReplyDelete
  164. I have 6 beautiful hens and would love to win a bag of feed ! Love your page !

    ReplyDelete
  165. Amanda Mcneal2/17/13, 3:17 PM

    Thank you for another giveaway. Great information!

    ReplyDelete
  166. Its snowing here on Cape Cod today so instead of going bonkers i am making the chicken feeder you shared above...and finishing putting together my Bee Hive-Would LOVE to win the back of chow for my girlies...they deserve the BEST!

    ReplyDelete
  167. Love this article and am so pleased with my new egg carton labels!

    ReplyDelete
  168. TheChickenChick2/17/13, 7:40 PM

    Lots of fun projects, great use of time during a snow storm, Julie! Good luck in the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  169. TheChickenChick2/17/13, 7:44 PM

    That sounds reasonable to me, Bianca. I'd cut out the morning portion as soon as temps warm up a little bit and then cut out both as soon as possible thereafter.

    ReplyDelete
  170. I am commenting for the contest!   Would love to win some feed, we are getting new chicks at Easter time and can't wait!

    ReplyDelete
  171. I really love your site. I am glad I found it. My "Ladies" are so fun and each one has such unique personalities. I have 2 chicks in a brooder that I hatched and they r so cute! All my birds have been raised since birth or 2 days old. I also have 1 duck and 2 Turkeys. 

    ReplyDelete
  172. Love your site and the things I learn about chickens.  I would love to be entered in the Nutrena feed contest.  Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  173. thanks for the great information. I have liked and commented on nutrena site. I follow by email and on facebook. Thanks for the great information

    ReplyDelete
  174. Hollyolejnik2/17/13, 8:01 PM

    I would love to try this feed it looks great!

    ReplyDelete
  175. I'd love to have this food for my chickens! Chicken food is actually pretty expensive especally if you go through a bag pretty fast!

    ReplyDelete
  176. jill prescott2/17/13, 8:13 PM

    Hi Kathy, I entered but was already on your blog so hope I can still enter. I would love to try this feed.

    ReplyDelete
  177. I would love to win a 50 pound bag of Nutrena Poultry Feed. We are building up a flock of chickens (currently have 13) in addition to our three 6-month old goats, two turkeys, and our LGD named Clem (a Great Pyreness). Never knew how very entertaining they can all be.

    ReplyDelete
  178. great blog like it very much.

    ReplyDelete
  179. Another great blog. Thanks again for all the wonderful information.

    ReplyDelete
  180. Thanks so much for all the great info!!

    ReplyDelete
  181. Love your site!  I enjoy reading about your girls and your care and feeding tips.  Here's hoping i win the feed giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  182. Good tip on the oyster shells, I used to just mix mine in with the feed....not any more.

    ReplyDelete
  183. Everything you need to know/learn is right here on Chicken Chick's pages.. Thank you for your info ;)

    ReplyDelete
  184. I love the information on your blog.  The pictures are great and your knowledge is very relatable to my small flock!

    ReplyDelete
  185. We have problems with out teens going into the brooder area and eating all of the baby feed and drinking all of their water.  They even hog the brooder light.  

    ReplyDelete
  186. TheChickenChick2/19/13, 10:29 PM

    You really should keep the older chickens away from the brooder babies, Dawn.

    ReplyDelete
  187. I have been looking online for this info, your Blog is amazing and seems to always touch upon what I'm thinking. Of all the organic feeds which would you recommend and since our 6 chicks are 9 weeks old i feel after reading ur blog they should be off the medicated chick starter feed. I think I want to do soy-free, what are your thoughts on that? Also, do I need to provide scratch now or once they are adults?


    Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  188. Love the blog and get it on facebook. Currently my 15 eight week old chicks are in a big dog kennel with roof and shade cloth protection on the windy side. I installed roosts for them, too. It butts up against my big girls' enclosed run so they can observe each other. I have 27 hens and a rooster. They free range during the day. I use a minimum amount of scratch to coax them back into the run in the evening before closing them in for the night. They have a newly expanded coop and added nests in anticipation of the new arrivals later on. The pullets were sexed and I got them at two days old. However, it looks like we got three little cockerels - a wyandotte, a buffy and an araucana. There might be choices to be made. We also have two grown guineas, raised with the big girls, and four keets, being raised with the pullets. Would love the feed, by the way.

    ReplyDelete
  189. Great info Kathy... Donna post it on TLCC... Thank You. ~ Diane

    ReplyDelete
  190. TheChickenChick5/10/13, 11:09 PM

    Thanks for sharing, Diane and Donna! ♥

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...