Oct 10, 2012

5 Tips for a Cleaner Coop with Less Effort

It’s that time of year when I do a major coop cleaning and this year, it's an easier task than ever before due to a few simple modifications that were made in our coops. Not only is it faster to complete the semi-annual ‘deep cleanings,’ but I find that I am able to keep the coops cleaner in between deep cleanings by employing these five elements: droppings boards, removable roosts, a dedicated coop duster, sand and apple cider vinegar.
Droppings boards are essentially shelves designed to collect chicken poop deposited overnight. Backyard chickens spend most of their waking hours outside the coop, either ranging freely outside the run or wandering around inside an enclosed run, which means that droppings inside the coop accumulate primarily overnight underneath the roosts. Utilizing droppings boards to collect those droppings is a simple and effective method for keeping the coop largely poop-free.
 Each morning, I take my trusty beach pail and scrape the droppings into it with a taping knife. The droppings are then added directly to my compost pile. Droppings boards keep the litter/bedding cleaner, which means less frequent litter changes and less frequent litter changes result in time and money savings.
Beyond coop sanitation, droppings boards provide a daily opportunity to assess the health and well-being of the flock. I am able to see plainly whether a chicken has been injured in a scuffle overnight, has contracted coccidiosis, worms or diarrhea. Without droppings boards, most of that evidence would be hidden in the bedding, denying the chicken-keeper the opportunity to detect and treat certain health problems as early as possible.
 Drying the droppings boards outside the coop.
REMOVABLE ROOSTS
These roosts were removed with a sledgehammer.  The 2 x 4s were inserted into joist hangers:
When we purchased our first coop, it came with roosts permanently affixed to the walls. When we decided to install droppings boards, the roosts needed to be raised in order for the droppings boards to fit underneath. When reinstalling the roosts, my husband affixed joist hangers, which the 2-by-4s fit into, which made the roosts removable for cleaning. I find that removable roosts are much easier to scrub vigorously and thoroughly if they are on the ground outside the coop. It is also much easier to access the areas behind and underneath the roosts when they are out of the way. I tend to clean the removable roosts more frequently than I would stationary roosts because the task is so much easier.
Coop with roosts and droppings boards removed for semi-annual cleaning.
I had always used pine shavings as litter/bedding inside my coops until this spring, when I was persuaded to try sand. I was dubious about sand’s ability to perform as well as pine shavings, but I had a pile of sand in the backyard for use in the run, so I figured I’d give it a shot. After eight months of testing, I can report that sand has allowed me to keep my coops the cleanest they have ever been for a fraction of the price of any other bedding material.
Like the droppings boards, sand is attended to once daily. I sift the sand using a compost/mulch fork that I have converted into the world’s biggest kitty litter scoop, with fine mesh hardware cloth and zip ties. It takes less than five minutes to sift the sand and doing so keeps the coop clean and augments my compost pile with primarily nitrogen-rich droppings, not pine shavings, straw or hay.

I used to clean out my 4-by-6-foot coop twice a month at the cost of approximately $10 per month in pine shavings. A one year supply of sand for both of my chicken coops and two runs is only $30.
 For more about the benefits of using sand as chicken coop litter, please visit my blog post here. 

DUSTER
The harsh reality of housekeeping in chicken coops is that they are perpetually dusty. Regardless of the litter choice, it generates dust. In fact, chickens themselves are especially dusty. If you have ever raised baby chicks inside the house in a brooder, you know this to be true.
To keep the dust to a manageable level, I keep a duster inside the chicken coop. Whenever I have a moment to spare, I give the walls, nest box curtains, window dressings and feedbag artwork a quick dusting, which makes the semi-annual cleaning a much less tedious undertaking.

The fifth tip for keeping a cleaner coop is to use raw, apple cider vinegar (ACV) to clean the coop, not only for seasonal deep cleanings, but for spot-cleanings as needed. I would never suggest paying upwards of six dollars for 8 ounces of brand-name ACV for coop cleaning; rather, I make my own raw apple cider vinegar. I use ACV in my flock’s drinking water, which is why I began making it initially this spring and for less than the price of a cup of coffee. I now have enough ACV to clean the White House from top to bottom.  

The droppings boards are cleaned with ACV and a brush.
For cleaning purposes, I pour the vinegar into a small bucket and use a stiff-bristled brush to scrub down the walls of the coop. For spot-cleaning other surfaces such as the PVC feeders, I simply pour some ACV onto a rag and wipe.
The acidity cuts through dirt, droppings and blood (yes, it happens) much more effectively than any other cleaning product I have tried. There is no rinsing required and interestingly, it does not leave the coop smelling like a salad bar. There is no need to dilute it or mask it with some other scent; the vinegar smell dissipates very quickly, leaving the coop sparkling clean ... at least until the chickens return.  

142 comments :

  1. I always enjoy my visits to your blog. xo

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  2. Here's another tip.. On our farm we use mobile coops. Droppings hit the ground and we just roll the coop to a new spot. All coops have roosting bars in them. Then they lay eggs in a different area where they lay their eggs. A lot less work and the ground benefits. :) Carole

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  3. You have very interesting and useful topics. Look forward to your Facebook and blog everyday. Thanks for taking time to share with others.

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  4. Nice!! Chicken seem to flourish when they are able to touch the ground;)

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  5. Thanks for your great information Kathy!

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  6. I love your blog. I have learn a lot. about birds. i have turkey's too. All togeter.
    0

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  7. I love your blog i have learn a lot about bird's . I have turkey's too all togeter.16. so i can learn about them.

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  8. Where do I click to enter the 'Kathy Cleans your Coop Contest?'

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  9. TheChickenChick11/10/12, 6:25 PM

    HA!!!! Keep searching and if you find it, let me know! ;)

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  10. Paulette Douglas11/10/12, 6:27 PM

     This would be a perfect addition to the incubator thats on  my X-Mas wish list :)

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  11. TheChickenChick11/10/12, 6:30 PM

    Thanks Sam!

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  12. Would love one of these! Be a perfect christmas present to my babies that I hope to have next spring!!! :) Hoping to order some hatching eggs soon! So would love this! 

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  13. TheChickenChick11/10/12, 10:17 PM

    Good luck, Kelly! I have two of them and can't imagine brooding chicks without them!

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  14. This is just one of those things one should have on hand! Like today when I went to Chickenstock only planning on possibly getting one chicken to replace the one we had to put down last week for my daughter. Came home with six! Three of which still need heat...I had told myself also NO BABIES....Why don't I listen to myself?

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  15. TheChickenChick11/10/12, 11:50 PM

    HA! You have mastered chicken math. Bravo!

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  16. someone called me this week and said "I have 20 eggs getting ready to peep on Friday, will you take them"  she was hatching for someone else then they decided they didn't them.  so now I have NEW babies under a heat light.  I really want and need one of these also.

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  17. Mary Gilbert11/11/12, 9:37 AM

    trying really hard to subscribe to your blog...but it keeps saying can't connect...help.

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  18. TheChickenChick11/11/12, 12:42 PM

    Lucky you! Time for an EcoGlow! Good luck in the giveaway Rachel!

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  19. Erin Nicole Nelson11/11/12, 5:01 PM

    YAY!  I got it to let me follow you this time!  I regularly recommend your blog to the folks I mentor with chickens as a concise, easy-to-follow, easy-to -search resource!

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  20. TheChickenChick11/12/12, 12:35 AM

    That's so sweet of you to say, Erin. Thank you!

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  21. TheChickenChick11/13/12, 1:05 AM

    Thanks and I love your username!!!

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  22. I love this blog!  I just read your post on treating bumblefoot and although I did squirm a bit at the pictures, I now feel better about treating it here on my chickens.  We have had a few cases of bumblefoot and have tried hit and miss techniques to take care of it.  You explain how they get it and what to do and exactly what to use.  Thank you so much!

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  23. Would love to stop with the red light!

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  24. TheChickenChick11/13/12, 4:15 PM

    Thank you Jennifer, I hope it helped!

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  25. I subscribe to your blog via email and it makes me smile everyday! :)

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  26. Love your blog hope to win the ecoglow

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  27. Thanks for the info! We use  Oxine to disinfect our coops about once a week! 

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  28. Sarah Rumbaugh11/14/12, 10:49 AM

    When I designed my banty coop, I built the roosts to have a tray below them and a small door to open and remove the tray for easy poo removal! Planning an overhaul to the big chicken coop to do the same! :)

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  29. montanaflower11/14/12, 11:10 AM

    Helpful tips sure makes it more motivating to get the job done!  Thank you!  

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  30. I love your blog I share it with my family all the time. I look forward to the give-a-ways sure who doesn't?! The information is what I find invaluable. I know people here with chickens however no one ever seems to want to talk to me about it. Don't know why. I can't be a better Crazy Chicken Chick if I can't learn right? So I hang on your ever word!

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  31. I follow your blog via email and your FB!  Loved reading about the curtains you put up on your nest boxes and how you went thru so many different fabrics before discovering ones that would work.  I would LOVE, LOVE to win an EcoGlow!  I love Brinsea and have one of their Octagon incubators, but the EcoGlow is something I have been wanting!  

    My hens only want to lay in ONE nest box and it is the box farthest away from the door, so I'm thinking maybe they think it's more private?  Wondering if curtains would help them spread out a bit more.

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  32. Just lost several chicks to the room temp getting to cold, bout broke my heart..I love the brinsea products and soooo need a ecoglow, Thank for the chance to get one :)

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  33. TheChickenChick11/14/12, 9:24 PM

    That's so nice of you to say, Spencer. I'm happy to hear it.

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  34. TheChickenChick11/14/12, 9:24 PM

    Very sad, Tammi.

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  35. TheChickenChick11/14/12, 9:29 PM

    Thanks for your message! Happy to have you following me on Facebook and here on my blog!

    Hens are funny about egg-laying, it seems that regardless of the set-up, they all want to lay in the same box and usually at the same time!

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  36. TheChickenChick11/14/12, 9:29 PM

    I'll talk chickens with you any day. ;)

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  37. TheChickenChick11/14/12, 9:30 PM

    That's nice of you to say, my pleasure. Happy cleaning!

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  38. TheChickenChick11/14/12, 9:31 PM

    Sarah: I'd love to see your design, it sounds really smart!

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  39. TheChickenChick11/14/12, 9:31 PM

    Wow, you must have a sparkling clean coop! Keep up the good work. :)

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  40. Would love this for the babies I will get in spring. can't afford it so would love to win. Thanks for the giveaway.

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  41. I put boot trays under the roosts, just hose off!

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  42. TheChickenChick11/15/12, 5:24 PM

    Good thinking!

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  43. Jennifer Hansen11/15/12, 10:47 PM

    I too am a chicken chick...they are hilarious and mine all have names.

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  44. Miller Family Poultry and I always benefit from your blogs. Thank you for the tips and info you provide!

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  45. I would like to win one for my little o. I love your blog .: )

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  46. Miller Family Poultry in Indiana benefits from your tips and blog information. Thank you for all you provide!

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  47. I need this. So bad. I will throw a party with my chicks if I win :D

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  48. I would love to have this
    Wish Wish Wish

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  49. I always enjoy your posts!

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  50. keeping fingers crossed. I'd love to have this for my chooks!

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  51. I'm getting ready to try sand in my coop instead of pine shavings.....also going to put some curtains on my nest boxes!!!

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  52. I so want to win. Bill Bubba Jewett

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  53. Peggy Eiland11/19/12, 6:59 PM

    Thanks as always; tried to enter the other day but I don't think it went thru, so here goes again.  

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  54. Love LOVE this idea! Would be great for my fridge!!!!!! 

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  55. betty greaves11/19/12, 7:02 PM

    this would be very handy for egg rotation...would love to win this....

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  56. TheChickenChick11/20/12, 10:22 PM

    LOL Kelly! You're too funny.

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  57. TheChickenChick11/20/12, 10:24 PM

    You're in Peggy!

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  58. where do i use the vinegar just on the bottom or is it safe to use all over the coop 

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  59. TheChickenChick11/20/12, 11:38 PM

    It's safe to use anywhere in the coop AND inside your own house!

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  60. I am going to change to sand for my coop and run, thanks so much for the information on using sand instead of pine shavings. Also going to make curtains for my nesting boxes.!!

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  61. After having not raised chickens since I was a child, I am looking forward to doing so again soon. I have learned more on your site in 5 minutes than I have ever known about chickens! Thank you!

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  62. TheChickenChick5/30/13, 12:47 AM

    That's so nice of you to say, Amanda. Thank you. Enjoy your new flock!!

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  63. Lisa C, Albq6/28/13, 9:29 PM

    i wouldn't have time to do all that before i go to work in the morning. i just open the coop so the chickens can go into the run, and do the coop duties every morning.

    the four hens roost on a 2x4, situated narrow end up, about 42" off the ground with straw bales beneath. every AM when i change the water, i check the feeder-( which hangs on a sturdy chain- they cut it to whatever length you want at home desperate, and you just buy little attachment ends)- and has a small rim all around for the chickens to get food from, a traditional type feeder, fills from the middle, i put a pie tin to fill the hole from the top-and i rake the poop off of the straw bales, on to the floor, where it mixes w the straw laying about. i also assess the poop quality before i rake it onto the floor. the floor is dirt, i live in the city of Albuquerque, so not many predators to dig into the coop. eventually i transfer the straw/poop to the run so it can compost. i also have a feeder for oyster shell to always be available. i do put white vinegar, a tsp-tbsp in the water when i change it daily. and of course i throw all my veggie trimmings and the hens' favorite fruits- bananas and cantaloupes.

    i put the straw bales in the first place so the hens could climb up to their perch more easily, so they hollowed out the top of the straw bale in the top right back corner of the coop and that's where they lay their eggs. they just kept kicking the bedding out of the fancy nest box someone built for me. they almost never go inside it.

    the big expense was the coop- google 'hoop coop'. i paid someone to build one. it is 16' long and 8' wide, but that was not enough room for 4 hens, so i had about 1/2 of the backyard fenced in for a chicken run, around the coop- wire garden fencing and u-posts. my super nice handyman gave me the feeder and two gates that would have cost >$300 all told. so i lucked out there. we made gates out of the metal chain link frames he had and he put wire on, then placed the pivots by putting those over u-posts.

    after the initial big expense it's pretty easy breezy. when i tuck them in at night i give them all a pet or a kiss on top of their darling little heads, and close the coop up w 2 latches and a karabeener to 'lock it'.

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  64. Excellent advise *:>Chicken chick. live urs blogs

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  65. Ok, so that is how you clean the sand! I was always wondering about that. Right now I use a deep litter method with straw. It is hard work cleaning it every six months and since I have Fibromyalgia, I am in bed for a week after the semi-annual cleaning. I will have to look into what it would take to get sand out to where I live (I live in the boonies). Thanks again!

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  66. Denise Allison Magil8/1/13, 9:17 PM

    great thanks i use sand as well but waiting fo rdry spell to get a load

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  67. Cheryl Lindsay8/10/13, 4:51 PM

    I really want to try sand. I do not fit inside my coop so the litter box scoop seems much more manageable!

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  68. The wood floor on the inside of our coop we put linoleum on it. Makes it very easy to clean anytime. Things just kind of come off. No worries about the wood soaking up the nasty stuff. Just got some scrap pieces from a flooring store for a couple of bucks and used used construction adhesive to attach. A great waterproof solution.

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  69. TheChickenChick8/10/13, 8:55 PM

    Our flooring is linoleum over plywood too. I agree, easy to clean.

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  70. Dawn E. Sarver8/10/13, 9:54 PM

    i use something close to a dropping board, i have screen cloth hammocks under the roosts and like you a quick scrape daily lets me clean up and check health . when the coop was built i caulked every nook and cranny i could to give less hidey holes for lice n mites,i also gave it a good coat of white paint to seal tiny areas from bugs, the white shows dirt quick but keeps it brighter inside on cloudy days. lastly i put linoleum on the floor, i do use straw on the linoleum but on the deep clean days every other month or so (depends on weather and mud) quick rake with the leaf rake, sling acv around, scrub with an old broom let it sit for 5 min or so and hose it out. some times have to give a spot or two a little more attn, but still in and out in less than an hr for a through clean. acv is a great cleaner,and i love the dropping nets, really keeps things alot cleaner.thanks for all the really wonderful things you blog about,I learn so much!

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  71. TheChickenChick8/10/13, 9:56 PM

    Try it, Cheryl. If you don't like it, you can always switch back to whatever litter you're using now.

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  72. Kathryn Wetzel8/11/13, 9:09 AM

    hubby and i are getting ready for some cleaning at our coop and this is great information to have, thank you so much for sharing all you do!
    kathryn

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  73. TheChickenChick8/11/13, 12:55 PM

    My pleasure. I'd rather write about it than DO the cleaning! :)

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  74. Sara Michaud8/23/13, 11:49 AM

    I'm building a new coop now and never thought of using the deck brackets for the roosts. It'll make a much easier install and then even easier cleaning for the future!

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  75. Sara Michaud8/23/13, 11:50 AM

    I'm building a new coop and I chose linoleum too! Much more decorative than just wood. :)

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  76. Jenny Durbin9/16/13, 10:42 PM

    I like my roost boards to have the 4" side up -- though I do like the notion of being able to remove them easily with the joist hangers. Mine are held on with a single screw and therefore remove easily enough, but I will investigate further and see what I can find. You have a lot of very workable ideas. thanks.

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  77. I have learned a lot from reading your post as well.. And I'm hooked on chickens, just got 7 more from My Pet Chicken. Thank You Chicken Chick!!!

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  78. Vicki Hayes9/26/13, 2:40 PM

    Question, you say you use ASV in the flocks water. What are the benefits of that and how much do you use?

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  79. Traci Cooper Church9/26/13, 2:52 PM

    Excellent tips and reminders on the importance of taking and making time to keep the hen house sparkly :-) Any thoughts on using regular vinegar for the deep clean of walls and such?

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  80. Jessica Wood9/26/13, 3:07 PM

    Wonderful. I never knew I could use ACV. I know what my plan for the coop will be this weekend :)
    Thank you!

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  81. You can make joist hangers with 1x1's as well, which is what we are doing. Just outline the bottom and sides of the 2x4 with the 1x1's and then slide the 2x4 in. :)

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  82. Flock Mistress9/26/13, 4:42 PM

    I created a "poop hammock" under my roosts. Attached a sheet of heavy denim to two wooden dowels and attached those to the coop. Takes just a minute to pop them out and dump the contents into the compost and be done w/ it.

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  83. Kathy Tedford9/26/13, 5:57 PM

    I am switching to removable roosts. Right now I have natural tree branch roosts and they seem to be a little narrow for their feet. I would like to see how your nest boxes are built into your coop. I would like to use 5 gal buckets that are accessible from the outside. Looking for some ideas

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  84. PrecioustoHim9/26/13, 6:06 PM

    I tried sand but it got so dry and dusty whenever i was scopping the poo with the fork/litter scoop that I made with hardware cloth that I couldn't stand being in there when i was cleaning it so i couldn't imagine the chickens being in there. They like to scratch around a lot in it and I could see the dust rising. They have very delicate respiratory systems, so I went back to using oat straw which they love to scratch around in. It creates a lot of waste true but oh well, I have 26 acres to dump it on.

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  85. PrecioustoHim9/26/13, 6:08 PM

    My apple trees need some serious pruning....so I use apple branches for their roosts. They love them and since they are round their feet fit them perfectly. The branches are strong and sturdy. In one coop I have on that has been there for 4 years now and will hold over 50 lbs of birds.

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  86. Laurie Brown Rowley9/26/13, 8:59 PM

    I have about 19 chickens in my flock. I feed them a combination of scratch and egg layer and use vinegar in their water occasionally. Is there something else I should be doing to enhance the health and happiness of my chickens?

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  87. TheChickenChick9/29/13, 9:51 PM

    ACV (apple cider vinegar)- you can read about it here, Vicki: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/07/make-raw-apple-cider-vinegar-acv-with.html

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  88. TheChickenChick9/29/13, 9:51 PM

    Any kind of vinegar is totally fine, Traci.

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  89. TheChickenChick9/29/13, 9:52 PM

    Right on!

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  90. Liz Simmons9/30/13, 8:42 PM

    First I would like to say I love your web site, this is my first time raising chicken and I love them to death, they are such great pets. I keep hearing the ACV is good for worming for the chicken too. how much and how often do I put this in there water I have a fear one of my ladies may have worms but not really sure the eggs have been coming out with spots but doesnt look like poo can I just dont this as a precaution?

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  91. TheChickenChick9/30/13, 9:23 PM

    Check out my virtual coop tour, Kathy! http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2011/05/virtual-tour-de-coop.html

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  92. TheChickenChick9/30/13, 9:32 PM

    They should not have scratch mixed into their feed at all. How old are they, Laurie?

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  93. TheChickenChick9/30/13, 9:42 PM

    ACV is NOT a de-wormer at all. It is intended to be used as a part of an overall program to keep chickens healthy. If you think they have a worm infestation, bring a sample of the droppings to a vet for a fecal float test.

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  94. Laurie Brown Rowley10/1/13, 12:49 PM

    They are approximately 2 to 4 years old.  What should I feed them? Also,  can my roosters eat the same stuff?

    Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Smartphone

    -------- Original message --------

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  95. Laurie Brown Rowley10/2/13, 9:35 PM

    They range between 2 & 4 years old. What should I be feeding them? And, what should I feed my roosters?

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  96. Sherry Kearney10/3/13, 11:59 AM

    Great blog!....Kathy, thank you so much for sharing all your knowledge & love of chickens<3

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  97. TheChickenChick10/4/13, 8:15 PM

    Thank you, Sherry! Nice to have you with me! :)

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  98. I love the joist hanger idea.

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  99. TheChickenChick10/19/13, 8:39 PM

    Credit to my husband for that one! :)

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  100. Dawn Montgomery10/19/13, 9:33 PM

    Great tips! Love the droppings board idea.

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  101. TheChickenChick10/19/13, 9:57 PM

    Thanks Dawn!

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  102. Fantastic blog, learning a lot! Thank You =)

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  103. I'm redesigning my coop and love this idea. How far apart did you space the roosts?

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  104. Heather Kite3/8/14, 8:48 AM

    We had an issue with the poop boards in the frozen wasteland that is Michigan in the winter of 2013/2014. The poop froze during the night and was nearly impossible to scrape off in the morning. We had a metal kitty litter scoop that we were using to do the job, but it lasted 1 day in the winter. Does your taping knife hold up to frozen chicken poop in the winter? Thank you so much!

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  105. TheChickenChick3/8/14, 5:21 PM

    The taping knife IS very sturdy, BUT...if you sprinkle some sand on the droppings board after you clean it each day, the poop won't stick (kind of like cornmeal on a pizza peel!)

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  106. Heather Sue3/8/14, 8:23 PM

    Sand!! What a great idea! Thank you so much!

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  107. Denise Allison Magil3/31/14, 1:10 PM

    Love the hints I used news paper for winter on poo boards easy remove paper and replace with fresh done no time flat

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  108. Carol Payne Lightsey4/14/14, 4:12 PM

    Awesome ideas! Can't wait to try some of these.

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  109. You're information is excellent! The pictures are really helpful too. Thank you so much!

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  110. Lori Gallagher Duke4/16/14, 8:29 AM

    Thank you so much. We are just getting ready to finish up our new coop. I am so excited to tell my hubby about the sand. Man those shavings can be a pain in the behind. I am loving this idea. I love your idea with the vinegar as well.

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  111. You make it sound so easy.

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  112. Hi, great site and great coops. Can I ask 2 questions, please?
    1) was it difficult to get the chickens to enter the nesting boxes through those little curtains
    2) I've often read that you need to ensure all the roosts are at the same hight to prevent fighting for the top branch. Didn't you have any issues with that since your roosts are stacked?

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  113. No is the answer to both! :)

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  114. Anne Hicks Weller5/19/14, 10:06 PM

    what is the recipe for making your own ACV?

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  115. Anne Hicks Weller5/19/14, 10:06 PM

    Also the bottom of my coop is hardware cloth wire. Someone suggested I use oak leaves on that instead of pine shavings. Any opinions?

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  116. The link to the ACV is clickable, Anne and will bring you to that article.

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  117. I don't recommend leaves. They're not absorbent enough.

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  118. Cindy Darden5/20/14, 6:23 PM

    Great tips

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  119. How about using cat litter in your coop or is there something in it that may not be good for your chickens.

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  120. No, kitty litter is toxic if eaten.

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  121. Thank you so much for your reply, I thought so.
    Enjoy all your posts and am learning a lot in my first year chicken raising adventure.

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  122. what a great blog/forum you have given me...I discovered you just after I got my girls and have been following since then...these are my first chickens and they are doing very well, partly b/c of the info I have gotten from you...thank you for that!!...
    may the chicken force be with you...
    sharon

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  123. Thank Sharon, glad I could help!

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  124. Rebecca Allison5/30/14, 10:47 AM

    Great ideas...can't wait to have my own coop

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  125. Tyler Christensen6/6/14, 1:16 PM

    I have been reading a lot about the new product Koop Clean, have you ever tried just using the product in Koop Clean, Sweet PDZ, by itself over your chicken's bedding? I'm interested in knowing if it would keep the urine smell out..

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  126. I just wanted to say Thank You! My boyfriend and I are just finishing up our first coop, our little girlies are hopefully going to be so happy. We have a lot to learn and appreciate people like you!
    Thank you!

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  127. Does the ACV need to have the "mother" in it? I know it does for consumption but what about for cleaning? Thank you.

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  128. It doesn't need to have the mother for cleaning purposes.

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  129. Great! Thanks so much for your reply. I appreciate your time!

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  130. Angie Burkhart-Paluch8/9/14, 11:40 PM

    If I decide to try the sand, should I still sprinkle DE in the coop?

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  131. Absolutely not. I do not recommend the use of DE for chickens at all.
    I recommend Sweet PDZ. You can read all about it in my article here: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2014/08/naturally-sweeter-coops-healthier.html

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  132. Angie Burkhart-Paluch8/13/14, 9:32 PM

    Thanks so much!

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  133. I love the idea of the screen on the mulch fork because I loose so much dirt and sand when I clean the outside of their house

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  134. Robert Kresse10/13/14, 9:34 PM

    I use my dry grass clippings for bedding is that ok I plan on going to sand as we expand as I have herd you sugest I have eight chickens we have raised from chicks

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  135. I don't recommend grass for bedding. It's not absorbent and will decompose inside the coop, creating an unhealthy environment.

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