May 1, 2012

Why Water is Critically Important to Chickens

“Water is the driving force of all nature.” Leonardo da Vinci

At 103°F in the shade, water is critical to survival. This area was intentionally flooded & the food placed in the middle of the puddle to cause the hens to wade in it to cool off.

I have always known that my chickens need clean, fresh water, but I never knew the scope of its importance until recently when researching some questions I had on the subject. The following is the essence of what I learned about chickens' water needs.

For Metabolism
"Water is involved in every aspect of poultry metabolism. It plays important roles in regulating body temperature, digesting food, and eliminating body wastes. At normal temperatures, poultry consume at least twice as much water as feed. When heat stress occurs, water consumption will double or quadruple."
The Essential Nutrient
"Water is often taken for granted, and yet it is probably the most essential nutrient. Water is by far the single greatest constituent of the body, and, in general, represents about 70% of total body weight. Access to water is very important, and a lack of water for several hours will probably cause a decline in egg production. Hens are more sensitive to a lack of water than a lack of feed.”
Amount of Water Needed
"Water and food consumption rates are interdependent, so reduced water intake can also lead to reduced food intake. There are other factors that affect water intake, with temperature being the most obvious one. For example, chickens drink between 30-50% more water when the environmental temperature is above 32oC compared with when it is 21oC. Water intake is also affected by the type of drinkers used. The rule of thumb for water intake is that water intake is usually 1.5 to 2 times feed intake."

For Digestion
“Water in the crop softens the feed so that digestion can occur. Without the water, dry feed forms clumps in the crop that can press on the bird’s carotid artery, decreasing blood flow to the brain. This can cause paralysis and possible death. Poultry anatomy complicates matters. A split in the upper hard palate of the beak allows air into the nasal passages and prevents the chicken from forming a vacuum in its mouth. Hens, therefore, rely on gravity to draw water into the crop."
As my flock has grown in size and number, so have the number and size of waterers I have tried. The smaller, 1 gallon waterers require filling twice each day, which is not convenient. Not only is more work to keep many, smaller waterers full but it is much more work cleaning each one regularly. My current goal is to reduce the number of waterers, trips to the hose and minutes spent cleaning each week.

For Egg Production
An egg consists of approximately 75% water and without access to a regular, clean supply of water, a hen will be physically unable to produce eggs.
With baby chicks, I find that raising the waterer up from the floor with a block of wood or cookie tin keeps the water cleaner longer. They will eventually learn to climb on top of the waterer and a large, upside-down funnel works to discourage that behavior.
Keeping water liquid during freezing temperatures is a major challenge that must be met as chickens' feed consumption increases in the cold and they require water to digest it. I made several cookie tin water heaters, for less than $10 each, which work well
even in below-freezing temperatures.
I snickered to myself when I opened the box and found instructions. Seriously? Who needs instructions to use a waterer?  Suffice it to say that between my husband and I, with two college degrees and a law degree between us, we were unable to figure out how to make the water stay in the unit. Much like some people who loathe the idea of stopping the car to ask for directions, I was not fond of the idea of calling to ask someone how to use this product, but it had to be done.

Bob, a product manager with the manufacturer, Harris Farms, is a good and patient man, who spent a solid 45 minutes trying to explain it to me, part by part. I admit now that it is not a complicated system, but the assembly instructions could be made clearer. I told Bob to explain it to me like I was a five year old and the following is a visual representation of our conversation. I think these photos should be included with every unit sold. ☺
This waterer cracked without having made it through one winter here in New England.

The float stop controls the flow of water into the base and is the linchpin of the entire operation. Ours was not in the correct location and was never going to work properly unless it was in the proper position. Now that it is, this waterer is a dream. Since it will serve up to 75 chickens, I now have an excuse to get more chickens. I like to think of it at The Big Gulp®, for poultry. :)
Bottom of waterer with float mechanism
The parts. There is also an O-ring on the top thread of the bolt, which is hard to see here. The float stop is the key to the waterer's operation. The plug simply allows the bucket of water to be filled without running into the base while the waterer is carried to the desired location.
Looking down into the bottom of the white water bucket at the male end of the plug holder. 
Bottom view of the of the white, water bucket. This piece meets the green base and float. The float stop MUST be in the female end of the plug holder to operate correctly.
View of bottom of waterer base. The nut is inserted through the bottom of the white water bucket and the bucket is held in place against the float and green base. The nut is then threaded onto the bolt.
View of the bottom of the white water bucket with the nut & bolt
secured and the water plug covering the male end of the plug holder.
View looking down into the white water bucket. The plug is removed during operation to allow water to flow through to the float stop.
The lid of the waterer has notches that fit into the white water base, 
which prevents the lid from blowing off in high winds.
Fill waterer with plug in place and remove plug prior to operation.
Enjoy ladies!
Disclaimer, The Chicken Chick®
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

137 comments :

  1. Why is it I provide fresh clean water for the girls, but they prefer to drink out of the dogs water bucket or even puddles?? Can't figure that one out....

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  2. That is an outstanding question, one I have no answer to, however. I read once that a chicken's water supply is only as clean as the dirtiest source available. It's not just your chickens, believe me!

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  3. I also heard they are attracted to running water and a friend made a small waterfall/pond for her chicks to drink from. Nothing too deep, because they may fall in and drown, but enough that they could drink from the falling water or the pond area. She just uses the hose to fill it when necesary, and flushes it when it gerts dirty.

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    1. What a great idea! I'd love a chicken waterfall and pond! (Hmm...might need some ducks then too!).

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  4. You never stop amazing me with all the info you give me. I thought I knew alot about my chickens but every time I look at your blogs I learn something new. Thank you so much. Keep up the awesome work.

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  5. Pretty sure this waterer will be on Wish List for the hens!!
    hardyhens14@yahoo.com

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  6. thank you for this blog entry, it was very infomative, and shows how i can impove and why...

    Melissa~

    the_welder_girl@yahoo.com

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  7. Do they make a waterer that my chicks can't climb all over? They seem to sit on top of it in the brooder and poop there. I have to wash it 10+ times/day! Any ideas anyone? flippinggoldfish@yahoo.com

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    1. Take a funnel that's larger than the waterer and put it on top of the waterer. You may need to tape it onto the waterer.

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  8. My 6 girls get to free-range the backyard during the day. I have several large dog bowls around the yard so they have water at all times. For the winter I got 2 heated dog bowls, one for their pen and one for near the house.

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    1. Loreen, you can make a water heater from a cookie tin for under $10, which works as well as the heated dog bowls. DIY instructions are on my blog here: http://eggcartonlabels.blogspot.com/2011/11/make-cookie-tin-waterer-heater-under-10.html

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  9. I love that big 4-H easy fill....I am going to have to find a few of those for my Turkeys. During the summer months, I get little done here, trying to keep water on the birds....I will take a coffee can, freeze water in it, then plop it down in the big water cans I have for them, it is cold, and melts into fresh water.
    justusnak@aol.com

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  10. Very informative! I really like that waterer that you chose from Jeffers.


    Lance

    donaldlanceward@hotmail.com

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  11. great info, now if someone could post a solar heated waterer I would be happy. I bought some of the ones that plug in, they cracked after just a few days, what a waste of money that was.

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    1. Lisa, if you have access to electricity, try this cookie tin water heater. It's super inexpensive ($5-$10) very easy to make and works great with plastic and metal waterers.
      http://eggcartonlabels.blogspot.com/2011/11/make-cookie-tin-waterer-heater-under-10.html

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  12. I had one big waterer in the run, and I recently added another, they drink alot more than you would think, and you are so right especially in the hot weather.And the biggest life saver?!?!? The homemade heated base out of the cookie tin.Wow was that great!! I am so diligent about their fresh water. I mean gosh how would we feel if we could not get to a fresh water source. Thanks for the great info, and a bigger thanks for the heater idea!!! Dianna Ellis dianna.ellis@gmail.com

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    1. Funny, Dianna! Happy to know you find yours as useful as I do mine in the winter.

      In case anyone is wondering what we're referring to: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2011/11/make-cookie-tin-waterer-heater-under-10.html

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    2. Congratulations Dianna! You have won the Happy Hen Treats prize package!! I will email you with details. :)

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  13. Just another reason for me to go buy cookies and eat them all. So I can make a cookie tin water heater.

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    1. LOL, Rachel. Any excuse will do! http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2011/11/make-cookie-tin-waterer-heater-under-10.html

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  14. Thanks for the info i have two waterers in the coop they do drink alot of water.

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  15. Your articles never fail to teach me something. Thank you!

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    1. Thank you Terri, I'm happy to know that. I always learn something in my research while I'm writing them. :)

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  16. I change our chickens water a couple times a day and one thing I put in it to help with bateria and slime down is a few drops of oxine AH. The water taste better with the oxine and the birds will drink more which is even better for them.

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    1. I've never heard of oxine AH, I'm going to have to look into it. Thanks for the info, Robin.

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  17. I have a 8 gallon water, but I also like to feed my chickens frozen treats. Yesterday they had zucchini, today I'm thinking blueberries.

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  18. I have two waterers. One in the coop & one in the run. We recently had 6 eggs hatch & in case they get into the run & not able to get back in the coop, I don't want them to be stuck without water. I like the idea of the 4-H Easy Fill Drinker. It gets really hot here in Virginia & it's a long walk to the water hose & back again with full waterers.

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    1. Good thinking on the placement of the waterers, Jennifer.

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  19. The information here has been helpful especially the amount of water containers and the temp ratio to water. I'll try the cookie tin heater this winter.~ Sparkle

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    1. Sparkle, let me know how you like the cookie tin water heater!

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  20. lmoreda1@tampabay.rr.com5/11/12, 12:40 PM

    my 13 yr old hen loves fresh water and treats :).

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    1. Wow, that's an impressive age! You clearly take very good care of her.

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  21. Julie Kharramba@frontier.com5/11/12, 12:50 PM

    That is my favorite part of the day when I refill all of the water bowls and hanging water buckets. Makes me feel good with fresh water !

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  22. I ordered the 4-H Easy Fill Drinker after reading this story, I am so excited to get it. However I may have to refer back to this to put it together! LOL

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    1. Let me know if it's more intuitive for you than it was for me. You will love it!

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  23. My husband put in a self water-er for "my Girls"....it is even heated so no freezing in our mild winters in Oklahoma.
    Thank you for always offering up GREAT information!

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  24. This is the first time we've had chickens...thank you for all the info! Maritta yokomocha@yahoo.com

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    1. Congratulations on your new pets, Maritta! I'm happy to have you with us on Facebook and my blog!

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  25. That looks like a great waterer! I have 3 different water bowls in our run for my 6 girls and they are always dirty! I may have to pick up the Eazy Fill before the weather really warms up here. :)
    brit868@yahoo.com

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  26. Thanks for including the link to Cookie Tin Waterer Heaters. Terrific!! :)

    Caprese :)

    parks90@comcast.net

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  27. Ronda Chiappetta5/11/12, 1:16 PM

    I have to say, that you have been a part of my "chicken journey" since the beginning! I love all the information you provide, I've learned so much. I enjoy all the stories people have shared and definitely all the pictures. I never knew that I would love having chickens so much before I started, but if I had more property, I'd have way more chickens, and probably hatch my own chicks. But alas, we are topped off at 6 chickens, 4 (our first) last year and 2 this year, and now we have 2 ducklings also.(Which I think you should get, cause they're so much fun!) My girls love when they get fresh water and since they were babies I've always loved watching them drink. I learned today about how important it is from your blog, and I will definitely be more diligent in making sure they never run low. Thanks so much!

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    1. That's so nice of you to say, Ronda. It's so nice having you on my FB page and blog!

      Are you trying to stir up trouble with ducks over here? LOL!

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    2. Ronda Chiappetta5/11/12, 1:31 PM

      I should post pics of the duckies, maybe their overwhelming cuteness will draw you in...LOL

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  28. Cathy Hansen5/11/12, 2:17 PM

    Water,water everywhere is my motto...Inside, outside, bowls, buckets and waterers...and yes..they like puddles the best..!!

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  29. Martha Waugh5/11/12, 4:00 PM

    Keeping the water clean seemed like a losing battle until I found water nipples online. We used an Ace Hardware bucket and drilled holes at the bottom for the nipples. My ladies learned to use it right away. Walahhh! Clean water all the time.

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    1. I'm going to give these the ol' college try one more time, Martha!

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  30. Dana Galagan5/11/12, 4:02 PM

    Good information. I am just about ready to give up on my metal water container. I considered going to a nipple watering system, but am afraid my older girls wouldn't get the hang of it.
    When they're out free ranging, I know they'll make use of the various containers of water in the yard, but on days when they're confined to the run I need to have a container that best suits their needs. Plus I want to start adding ACV to their water and can't with the metal fount.

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  31. I love the cookie tin water heater idea. I will be using that this winter! You always have such interesting tips and ideas!

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  32. ducks r a pain to keep with chickens they just play in the water-so fill fill fill is all i can do on hot summer days! I tried to seperate my ducks from my chickens but all they did was pout by the fence chickens laying on one side ducks on the other until i finally gave in and let them reunite-pathetic i tell u-but once a flock is raised together they stick together-and get there way together!

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    1. LOL Brandi! Silly ducks. I wonder if using nipple waterers would help or if the chickens would still try to drink from the ducks' water?

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  33. I keep about 4 different water buckets available on the property for the chickens....

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  34. I make a habit to change water twice a day for my gals...and have a thermometer in the pen to pay attention to the temp. I did locate the coop and pen under trees so in the summer they are in the shade and then in the winter with the leaves off the trees they can get some heat from the sun. :) Off to change water again.... :)

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    1. Good for you, June. That's one way to keep healthy, happy chickens.

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  35. Just needed to get a bigger water bucket, luckily it was on sale :)

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  36. I love the idea of a fountain on the ground! I freeze ice in 1 qt containers in the summer to put in the waterer during the summer. They definitely drink a lot more when it's hot!

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    1. The frozen blocks of ice are a life-saver in the heat. Great thinking!

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  37. patricia butler5/11/12, 6:35 PM

    My Chickens and Guineas free range during the day of our 5 acre place so I have several rubber pans around the place for them so they are never too far from water. I have also noticed that other critters have used the pans- squirrel, wild birds, a fox. I do like the 4H waterer that you showed, might have to get one of those.

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  38. I have a 5 gal metel, 2 1 gal plastic drinking waterers.2 3 gal pans for them to wade in. for 35 chickens. Do you think that is enough. O and fresh water every day of course.

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    1. The number of waterers are not as important as the fact that the chickens have access to cool, clean water at all times.

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  39. i def want to invest in the heated water for winter and would love to have those force fed water cups they r really kool ty for being as always informative and funny too ty:)

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    1. Michelle, it's a five dollar investment if you make your own. Here's how: http://eggcartonlabels.blogspot.com/2011/11/make-cookie-tin-waterer-heater-under-10.html

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  40. We made our own nipple drinker system with a plastic 30 gal drum with a lid and pvc pipe. Hubby's own design! Works like a charm :)

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    1. I would love to see your husband's design if you'd like to share a pic on Facebook. I just bought some improved nipple screws to try again. The first time, I wasn't too keen on them but am willing to give it another shot!

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  41. I have had my hens for about a year now, and a few months ago, I realized that they are not drinking out of their 2 waters in the coop very much - then I realized during the day when they are out in the yard, they like to drink out of the 2 large water buckets I have outside the back door for the dogs! LOL So I started adding a little ACV to the dog water - everybody is happy :) Thank you for another wonderful blog post!!

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    1. Chickens are funny with their preferences sometimes, aren't they? LOL

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  42. Thank you for all the helpful information. I want to find a couple of the bigger water containers since I'm expanding here. I just received 35 meat chicks and 20 more layers.I can't keep caught up with family and friends wanting farm fresh eggs.

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    1. My pleasure Sue. Good luck with your game of supply and demand!

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  43. Thank you for always giving us helpful information. I am a newbie and was wondering if you chickens had a preference of one waterer over another. My girls are only 8 weeks old, but trot back into their coop for water everytime instead of drinking from the ones I have placed outside and it seems that they go through food faster then water. Is that a chick thing or is there something I can do to get them more interested in the water?

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    1. My pleasure! I don't believe my chickens have a preference with waterers, although they seem to have very definite preferences about most other things!

      They will drink as much as they need, just be sure it's clean and cool. They don't like warm water or water that has an off taste.

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  44. Love reading your poultry input. Like the water review also. I had not seen this one in my search for a watering system that will work on our "farm". Hubby is the one who is trying hard to get the chicken and poultry area ready as he is beside himself when he walks by the poultry section in our Wilco Feed Store. He just brought in 5 eggs from his runner ducks as I sat here reading your blog. Our last chicken coop has been remodel or in the stages of remodeling. I am white washing the inside to allow more light, feed tubes being put in for all their needs, and decore fitting a chicken house will be put up. Thinking of printing off some pictures of past chickens and other poultry we have had to put on their walls along with curtians for the bucket they use to lay eggs. Thank you for the fun take on raising poultry. Robin M

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    1. Thanks so much, Robin! I'd love to see some pics on FB when you're done decorating!

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  45. Thank You for posting the directions on the 4-H easy fill drinker. I purchased one of these several month ago and have came really close to throwing the stupid thing out. Mine came with out directions as well. It was assembled when I purchased it, so I just assumed that that was how it was suppose to be and that I did not need to do anything else besides fill the thing. I filled, no water. I loosened the nut thing and water started flowing into the drinker. 15 minutes later thing was empty,water all over. How mad I was. I played with the plug, but did not want to break something so I did not pull up to hard. Tried twisting bucket, thinking that there was a lock or something.At this time I REALLY HATE this water system. But now that I have read this I will go home and remove the plug thing to see if that works. If not then maybe I can use this thing as a planter and I will figure something else out for my chickens. I know that you are not the manufacturer and I am sorry to sound like I am complaining to You, but in actuality, I am thanking you for posting directions and troubleshooting.

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    1. Once you realize how it is supposed to work, you will LOVE this waterer. Trust me, it came close to planter status at my house too but now it's a real time saver.

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  46. I use ice cream buckets. The girls drink our of the ducks' wading pool as often as not. But I only have three hens and two ducks. Come summer we set up a misting system on the porch in the shade.

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  47. Water makes up 70% of body weight. It is easy for them to become dehydrated! You need fresh water to replenish water that is lost!

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  48. Thanks for the information!

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  49. I love the idea of putting their food in a "puddle" so they can walk through to cool off! We haven't had HOT temps yet, but it's nice to have ideas for when it does.

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    1. I have an entire blog post dedicated to tricks I use to 'beat the heat.' Check it out here: http://eggcartonlabels.blogspot.com/2012/04/beat-heat-how-to-help-chickens-survive.html

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  50. I think we are going to have to get a 4-H drinker. I love the way it looks and seems like it might be a good fit for us.
    I swear it feels like I run back and forth with the hose all day filling up all the waterers.

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    1. That's not only inconvenient for you, it's potentially dangerous for your flock. Things happen and who knows if one day you might be prevented from refilling the waterers for part of the day? It's dangerous for them to run out, particularly in the heat. Bigger is better, Nikki. :)

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  51. Now if I can just teach the girls to not be so messy!

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  52. We've been using the fill top. However I want to convert some 5 gallon buckets to some waterers w/ the nipples this summer.

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    1. I tried the nipple waterers once but was convinced they weren't drinking enough from them, so abandoned the idea. Lots of folks swear by them though. The trouble with them is that they freeze in the winter, so you have to have traditional waterers anyway.

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  53. Great post! Love the waterer you got from jeffers!

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  54. I may have to look into the 4h one... now that I know where to go on the how to assemble.
    Angie Tamara Reed

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    1. Angie, congratulations! You have won a "Property of My Backyard Chickens" tee shirt! Please email me with your shirt size and mailing address!
      service@CustomEggCartonLabels.com

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  55. I love reading your blog & facebook page! I'm always amazed with the stuff I didn't know about my chickens. Thank you! -Audrey Siebert

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  56. Ah, having second thoughts on the float/water trough. That 4H waterer looks like it would work just fine for my 8 soon to be hens. I am down in S.E. Texas, where might I find it?
    Ilean Roberts-Hardy
    happyhens14@yahoo.com

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    1. Ilean, you can find it at JeffersLivestock. Go to the photo of the waterer in my blog post and click on the caption, it's a link directly to the 4-H waterer.

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  57. Love the 4-H drinker...think I have to look into getting one!

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    1. They're great, Gina. I think you'll really like it.

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  58. Martha Waugh5/19/12, 10:24 PM

    So informative...wish I had known about the 4-H drinker. I think I like that better than the nipple waterer I'm currently using.

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    1. I really wanted to like the nipple waterers, but I just never felt my chickens were drinking as much as they would have from an ordinary waterer

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  59. jolie larsen5/19/12, 11:22 PM

    I am a bit obsessive/compulsive about animals and water. It was a HOT day here in Wisconsin, with a breeze that felt like a blast furnace. Had multiple waterers w/ electrolytes in the coop and the run for the girls, and scrubbed and filled the horses' water tank so they could get their fill of cool, clean water.

    Love your blog...it's part of my nightly routine!

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  60. Esther Widgren5/20/12, 12:28 AM

    Water is essential! Thanks for the reminder how important it is for all of us!

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  61. Valerie Nelson5/20/12, 1:09 AM

    Lots of information here that is helpful and lots of great ideas on how our chickens get their water.. I get big pots from the local thrift shop. They hold up well in the winter when tapping out the ice..If it freezes solid, bring it in, fill up another.. Nothing fancy, but they work well :)

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  62. I have a 5 gal metel, 2 1 gal plastic drinking waterers.2 3 gal pans for them to wade in. for 35 chickens. Do you think that is enough. O and fresh water every day of course.

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  63. I use the stainless 3 gallon open waterers. But lately I've been having a neighbor save all his large gallon plastic ice cream containers--They make great waterers, especially if you are giving ACV (apple cider vinegar)in the water. They rinse out easily and are light to carry.

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  64. I was just looking into getting a nipple waterer so I thought I would check your blog to see what you use. You take such good care of your ladies. I always wonder how you can keep everything so clean and new looking.
    My wish is to find a way to keep the water clean. I have ducks that simply must put dirt in the water. The 4H waterer does not solve the problem of keeping 'stuff' out of the water. What did you not like about the nipple waterers? Any problems other than the freezing in winter?

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    1. Hi Diane!
      When I tried the nipple waterers the first time, my chickens were already nearly a year old and while I sat with them to teach them how to use them, I could not get past the feeling that they were not drinking as much water from them as they would have from a traditional waterer. I did not stick with them long enough to quantify my feeling to determine whether there was any real basis for the concern, I simply switched back (and watched the birds all dash straight to the waterers the moment they landed in the run).
      I'd like to try again with a different version, which I have already purchased. I really want to like them and to feel as though the girls are staying hydrated. We'll see I guess!

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  65. Kathy,

    I have problems with the float stop constantly falling out of it's place on this waterer. I hang the wateres and there is a small gap between the base and bucket, that seems to be large enough for the float stop to fall out. I have not had any luck with this waterer so far. Any suggestions?

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  66. I have the twist off bottom waterer and if your not careful to make sure the bottom is on right it will fall off and the water will soak your feet lol. I have had this happen a few times. cremesoda34@yahoo.com

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  67. I have an automatic waterer for the girls, plus a couple of large buckets around. Never want to have them without water. The automatic waterer is hooked up to a second hose and mounted in the run. Since the water line is underground, it's nice and cool water coming out for them.

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  68. was thinking of putting together a chicken fountain type system (i have crap tons of PVC in the hubby's shed) but can't figure how to keep it from freezing in the winter....ideas??
    currently planning to use your "cookie tin water warmer" with my metal 3 gallon waterer on the full grown chicken side of my coop, but my young chicks have a 1 gallon that they make a huge mess with so i was hoping to switch to the fountain type for them....

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  69. TheChickenChick10/17/12, 9:17 PM

    I'm not aware of a system for keeping homemade PNWs from freezing in the winter. The Chicken Fountain products do have a heater accessory available for purchase though. That's what I use in my Chicken Fountains.

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  70. This happens to me too!  If I can't fill it, then my kids certainly can't!  If they do get it filled and the bottom on right, it is too heavy for them to flip back over!  Grrrrr!  I am thinking NPW this year!  Can ducks figure out the NPW's too?

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  71. So after a 5 month fight with my waterer, it now works perfectly thanks to you! Shout out and wahooooo!

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  72. mainemomandwife10/26/13, 6:32 PM

    heat tapes on the back of the pvc pipe will keep the water from freezing thats what we do and we live in maine

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  73. Dawn E. Sarver10/26/13, 11:21 PM

    possibly a pipe heat tape for house pipes, i use one on an out door "frost free" bib that tends to freeze. might have to completely cover with electric tape to protect from curiosity pecks....just a thought...

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  74. Lee-Ann Pittari10/27/13, 9:05 AM

    I agree that your pictures should be included with the instructions. :)

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  75. In one of the photos, it looks like you are using a nipple waterer with the cookie tin base? Does the nipple not freeze? I have been wanting to try nipple waterers, but now that fall is here and a cole winter ahead, I figured I would have to wait -- that they are only good in above-freezing temperatures. It also looks like what I am interpreting as the nipple is coming out of the cookie tine base, not the waterer itself. ????

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  76. TheChickenChick10/27/13, 7:59 PM

    No, the cookie tin water heater does not work with a poultry nipple watering system.

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  77. Jennifer Shaughnessy2/16/14, 1:13 AM

    So with 15 chickens how long would this water last? I thought on another post you said they need 3 gallons of water for just a half dozen flock?

    ReplyDelete
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  79. I'm definitely laughing as I thought something must be wrong with ME this evening as I was trying to assemble the waterer! I did it but the directions were in such small print! I'm glad you posted your photos as now I'll go double check my assembly. Great website! Thanks:)

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  80. Kurt Bergman6/4/14, 3:28 PM

    Keeping the water from freezing: Beer brewers use a simple device to keep their beer warm during fermentation. http://morebeer.com/products/fermwrap-heater.html?site_id=5

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  81. i buy organic eggs at a local farmer's market. often, the egg white contains liquid that does not harden when the egg is cooked.
    that makes it impossible to make a hard-boiled egg as the yolk will be cooked but the white will have runny sections.
    when i asked the chicken owners about this i was told that it's due to the fact that when it's too hot outside, the chickens drink lot of water which ends up in the eggs.
    does that seem right? have you ever experienced that? thank you.

    ReplyDelete

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