Feb 3, 2012

What's the Scoop on Chicken Poop? The digestive system examined.

Chicken poop; we don't speak of it at the water cooler at work, but we do here in the chicken world because it is important to pay attention to the appearance of chickens' droppings as they can be one of the first signs of disease and illness.  *Advisory: graphic photos of droppings and anatomical dissections follow.*
It is not as important to memorize every affliction that can cause a chicken's droppings to be abnormal as it is to be able to recognize when they are abnormal and to know that there is a wide range of normal droppings.
It helps to understand a little bit about the journey food takes through a chicken's body to appreciate the end result. (ha!)
*A chicken's digestive tract runs from the mouth to the cloaca..
*This is an actual hen's digestive tract.
 Food and water travels from the mouth, down the esophagus and into the crop where it is stored before moving down into the stomach (proventriculus). Digestive enzymes are added and food then moves into the gizzard (ventriculus) which grinds up the food. Grit or small stones eaten by chickens aid in breaking down food in the gizzard before passing into the intestines.

The ceca branch off the small intestine and absorb water contained in the fecal matter as it passes through. They serve several purposes, one of which is to ferment matter not previously  broken down. The ceca empty out their oh-so-foul-smelling contents several times a day. Cecal poop has a different texture and color from other droppings, it also has an extra heavy dose of STINK, however it is a very good indication that the digestive tract is working properly. Cecal poop color can range from yellow to black.

The last stop on the GI train is the cloaca. Here, the contents that have passed from the intestines combine with urates. Chickens do not urinate in the typical way, they eliminate waste products from the urinary system in the form of urate, which appear as a white cap on the top of the feces.

Eggs and fecal matter are both passed through the hen's vent, but the egg is not exposed to the droppings  as the vagina covers and protects the egg from contamination.
NORMAL DROPPINGS
Normal chicken poop
Normal with grass clippings makes it green.
Normal chicken droppings
Normal. Scratch visible.
Normal chicken poop
Normal, cecal poop.
Normal chicken droppings- white cap is urates, the chicken equivalent of urine waste
Normal fecal matter with urates on top (white cap)
Cecal chicken poop, normal.
Normal

Normal chicken poop- cecal droppings
The darker the cecal poop, the higher the stink ratio.
Normal chicken droppings, cecal poop.
Normal droppings.
Normal chicken poop in high heat due to increased water intake.
Normal chicken poop in high heat due to increased water intake.
Normal chicken poop picture
Normal.
Normal chicken droppings.
Normal.
Broody Poop- Normal
 A broody hen is a hen who sits in her nest all day and all night in hopes of hatching chicks. She briefly leaves the nest once or twice a day to eat, drink and relieve herself.  The hen, not wishing to foul her nest, retains her droppings for hours instead of the usual, frequent deposits throughout the day. The result of her bi-daily rest stop is broody poop, which is the most horrendous looking, foul smelling and ginormous of all possible droppings.
Broody chicken poop.
Broody chicken droppings
Broody poop with a lovely green color, evidence of foraging on green grass.

This is the droppings board in my coop; it catches the night's deposits and keeps the bedding cleaner, longer. I scrape it off into a bucket it first thing every morning, watching for anything abnormal. It is not unusual to find small amounts of red tissue in droppings; bits of intestinal lining are shed and slough off, being eliminated in the droppings, but large amounts of blood are not normal.
Chicken droppings on droppings board in chicken coop.
Much more information about droppings boards, HERE.

9/14/12. Moments before we brought our dog to the vet's office this morning, I found this suspicious deposit on the droppings board. My first thought was that it could be worms given the shape and color, so I grabbed a plastic bag and brought it to the vet for a fecal floatation test. Most vets, even those that do not ordinarily treat chickens, will perform a fecal float test for patients when asked. Many will even do it free of charge as my vet did.

When one chicken is found to have worms, the entire flock must be treated. Worming is serious business and ought not be taken lightly as it is taxing on a chicken's body and worms can build up a resistance to worming medications when over-used.
Suspicious looking chicken poop tested negative for parasites.
The float test confirmed that this specimen contained neither worms nor evidence of coccidiosis. The pink, stringy stuff was simply an unusually long piece of intestinal lining that had been shed. Gross, yes, but not a problem.
ABNORMAL DROPPINGS
The hen responsible for this specimen showed no symptoms of any problem either before or after she produced this. The blood and greenish component could be an indicator of worms; the watery nature combined with the blood could be an indication of coccidiocis. I monitored her carefully for a recurrence and was prepared to treat her for cocci but it was not necessary. This was the first and last poop of this kind by this hen.
abnormal chicken droppings
While this foamy, yellow specimen is abnormal (diarrhea) the chicken had no further such deposits and was otherwise well. Her diet was balanced and she was drinking normally. Yellow, foamy or greasy-looking chicken poop can be a sign of internal parasites, worms in particular.
Abnormal, yellow foamy frothy chicken poop can be the sign of a worm infestation.
The hen in this photo had no sign of illness prior to discovering these droppings on the droppings board. This hen had coccidiosis, a serious intestinal infection, which required treatment of the entire flock.
Bloody chicken poop.
The next two photos were from Esther, a 4 year old Easter Egger who had ovarian cancer that had spread throughout her internal organs. She had stopped eating and was passing watery, dark green colored droppings. She was euthanized by a vet shortly after this photo was taken. RIP Esther.
Chicken droppings from a hen dying of ovarian cancer.
The first indication of trouble in this hen was discovered on the 
droppings board underneath her preferred roosting spot.
Abnormal chicken poop from a hen dying of cancer.
The chicken responsible for this installment was suffering from a bacterial infection, presumably from an infected bite. When his immune system was compromised by the infection, roundworms had a chance to flourish. The roundworms were treated with Ivermectin.
Abnormal droppings from a chicken with a compromised immune system due to a bacterial infection.
These droppings were from Stella, my Silver Spangled  hen who was approximately 5 years old at the time. She had a severe case of egg yolk peritonitis and was euthanized by a vet upon discovery. Egg yolk peritonitis is very common in aging layers.
Abnormal chicken poop from a hen with egg yolk peritonitis.
This hen had a roundworm infestation. After one dose of Wazine, she perked up and was back to business as usual. The entire flock was treated and all affected birds showed improvement within 24 hours of being medicated.
Abnormal chicken poop with roundworms.
Same hen as photo above. Roundworms.
When abnormal droppings are found, it is important to know whether it is an isolated occurrence and if there are additional symptoms such as: loss of appetite, weight loss, lethargy, increased thirst or a drop in egg production. The chicken's diet should also be assessed to see whether it is balanced. Too  much protein or drinking large amounts of water can cause watery-looking droppings. If additional symptoms are noted, the cause needs to be determined. If no vet is available, a good starting point would be to consult The Chicken Health Handbook, by Gail Damerow. I highly recommend the addition of this book to every chicken-keeper's library. Pages 152-153 contain a chart of diseases that affect droppings by characteristic and age of bird.
disclaimer, The Chicken Chick®
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®
*Anatomical illustrations and photo reproduced for educational purposes, courtesy of Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore and Austin Cantor, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. Copyright 2011. Educational programs of Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, M. Scott Smith, Director, Land Grant Programs, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Lexington,and Kentucky State University, Frankfort. Copyright 2011 for materials developed by University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension. This publication may be reproduced in portions or its entirety for educational and nonprofit purposes only. Permitted users shall give credit to the author(s) and include this copyright notice. Publications are also available on the World Wide Web at www.ca.uky.edu. Issued 02-2011

156 comments :

  1. Love your blog, always informative!

    Quick question. If a hen has abnormal droppings are her eggs edible or should they be discarded?

    Thank you! :)

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    1. Thank you!
      If the droppings are abnormal the eggs are still fine to eat. The only exceptions to that are if you have to treat for worms because there is a withdrawal period due to the medication. Thanks for asking.

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  2. Finally! A realistic, common-sense explanation of chicken poop!
    People new to chicken-keeping, like myself, can easily be alarmed by loose, cecal droppings and the isolated bloody dropping.
    Many online forums would have one thinking your chick or hen had to be immediately treated for cocci or worms.
    Thank you for providing a voice of reason and a comprehensive list of droppings we DON'T have to worry about!

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    1. How nice of you to say that, I appreciate it. :)

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  3. This was a GREAT blog. So informational and the photos really do help. I'm amazed at the wide variation of "normal". Thanks for this.

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    1. Thank you, Flock Mistress. Happy to know it helps!

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  4. I learn so much about poop. Can you answer a question? My neighbor has a hen and she stopped scratching, she don't really move around she just kind of sets all the time. She is drinking and We think that she is eating but we haven't seem her eat so not sure. I helped her catch her the day she started to show problems and got her to her own pen all by her self. Her eggs don't have any shells on them any more either.

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    1. Hi Nicky. I'd need some more information about this hen to get an idea about what could be going on. Can you email me at service@CustomEggCaronLabels.com so we can discuss it some more?
      Thanks!

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  5. All good info (even know it is sick). haha

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    1. Thanks Donna. It's yucky but important to know. :)

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  6. Sharon Liljedahl sharonlilj@aol.com2/9/12, 8:24 PM

    Kathy,

    Excellent blog, all great information. I don't regularly treat for worms, never have had any problem, but do you know if we should treat even if we don't see any problems? Never really thought much of it, even when I had my horses, I did not treat just to treat only if the vet found any problems which they did not. Thanks Sharon

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    1. Thanks, Sharon!
      Some people treat for worms twice a year but I do not and never have had to treat my chickens. I think it's hard on them and there is a withdrawal period on eating the eggs, so unless I have good reason to suspect worms, I won't. If you're concerned at all, most vets will do a fecal test for you (it's just like the ones for dogs). They're relatively inexpensive and if it gives you peace of mind, that's great.

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  7. Marilyn Shapinsky2/12/12, 7:14 AM

    Thank you for sharing. This is very helpful, shows what to keep my eye out for, & what to do. I have a question for you. I have horses & I use garlic & ACV on them to help with worm control & fly control. I also feed them tobacco to help worm them, do you think it would work on chickens?

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    1. Happy it helped, Marilyn. Thanks.

      And yes, many chicken-keepers use ACV and garlic with their chickens. Some put the garlic in the waterers, some put it in a dish, crushed up but I've never heard the tobacco wormer used. Interesting.

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  8. Great poo article, seriously! Most would never broach this subject, but I;m glad you did..
    Suzi Fire

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  9. marilyn kiger3/28/12, 12:14 AM

    Yes, now the only other thing I need to know about the girls poop is how to keep my dog away from it!
    Again, THANK U

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  10. Kathy. I got diatomaceous earth and read that it.can be effective for.working. have.you ever tried that?

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    1. I bought it once. I'm not sure what you're asking about it though; effective at what? The Chicken Vet and Gail Damerow both have opinions on the use of DE that they have shared and that I wrote about on my blog. If you look in the left side-bar, you'll see the list of topics, scroll down to DE to find it. You may be surprised to learn what they have to say.

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  11. so glad you put this up! I have seen some of the normal poops, but they didn't look like normal. So glad to be in the poop scoop know! :)

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  12. Thanks again. I've learned so much from you. Better than any book I've read, and I've read quite a few. Very practical & hands on advice

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  13. Lol, made the mistake of clicking on this link from your FB page during breakfast...I bookmarked it! Great info that I will be back to see in more detail once I am not eating =)

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  14. Not filled with your usual pretty chicks & flower pics, but a really great blog to let us know what "normal" droppings look like. Thanks for going there Chicken Chick!!!

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  15. What a crappy post! (HA HA) :)

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  16. Very timely for me to read. I was just outside wondering "is this normal looking". And after reading this blog post: it is!

    THANKS!

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  17. Great blog!! Keep up the good work and thank you!!

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  18. As a newer chicken owner, this is really useful! Going to bookmark it! Thank you.

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  19. As a newer chicken owner, these pics are very useful. Thank you for posting this blog, I'm going to bookmark it. :)

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  20. Messy topic but good info :O
    -Donna/The LCC

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  21. Caroline Galbraith6/24/12, 8:00 PM

    Thank you for the information, the drop board is a really good idea too, I'll have to add that when I'm done making my coop, chicks arrive in a few weeks!

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    1. Congratulations Caroline! You have won tonight's random drawing! Please email me with your address: Kathy@The-Chicken-Chick.com

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  22. This is a good blog to use as a quick reference :)
    Shellie Werich, smw4211966@sbcglobal.net

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  23. Hey where did my mess go??
    -Donna/The LCC

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  24. Wow, who would have thought?

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  25. I like marshmallowy poopies that grow big in the sun. I don't know why but i just giggle like natures EASY BAKE OVEN ;)

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    1. LOL Dianne. Thanks for sharing your unique perspective as always. :)

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  26. This was a great blog. I learned a lot.

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  27. I knew chickens pooped and laid eggs from the same opening, but good to know that their reproductive organs flap over and protect the egg from poop! Great info too, esp. the pics of the poops to watch out for. Chel flippinggoldfish@yahoo.com

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    1. Congratulations Chel! You have won tonight's random drawing! I will email you for your address.

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  28. Thanks for the Scoop on Poop...;-) Love how much great info I get from you, Thanks.... Cheri Kaelin @Angel Hill Farm

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  29. Thanks for the scoop on the poop!

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  30. Poop! Nasty helpful pictures!

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  31. Rosa C. Calabrese6/24/12, 8:56 PM

    Thanks to your blog, I never have to worry about knowing what poop is good or bad. I just run to you blog, and I find the photo that fits. Thank you so much!

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  32. Gross pictures, reminds me of pictures of newborns poop-normal vs abnormal. lol

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  33. I try to watch my when it is really hot outside, for signs of dehydration. Both Turkeys & chickens..

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  34. ty for the info & pics is very helpful

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  35. Who knew poop could be so interesting! Thanks for the information.

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  36. You do an excellent job teaching us all the things we need to take care of our flocks. Thank You for sharing your love and knowledge with us.
    Ilean Roberts-Hardy
    hardyhens14@yahoo.com

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  37. Thanks for this article! I was wondering myself about the orangish foamy poop in my chicken run. Glad to know it's normal. I can handle the pics of poop, it's the pics of worms that got me gaggin. ;)

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  38. So, you might be really surprised what qualifies for dinner chatter at my house! Thanks for this post, it's really informative. We get LOTS of those chicken-head sized poops with the white on them and some of the runnier greenish ones. I've often wondered what exactly constitutes a sickly poop. I can rest easier now!

    Thanks again!

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  39. thanks for this!!!!! now i know what to look for. luckily i have not seen any "abnormal" droppings in my chickens' area.

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  40. One poop not mention here is a very runny and white one like spilt milk. My favourite hen did today. She seems well enough at the moment. Any ideas?

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    1. Glenda, there are a number of reasons that could be the case, Infectious Bursal disease being one of them. If you have a chicken vet you can consult, you should let them know in case it is something serious and/or contagious.

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  41. I almost lost it seeing the worms

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  42. Great post! Poo is kind of fascinating. (Did I just say that?) Before having kids, poop was just gross-then the baby comes along and 2/3 of your conversations revolve around poop. I'm finding it's rather the same thing with my chickens. Highly disgusting before, interesting now. I was curious about what the cecal stuff was, so thank you very much for that!

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    1. I always love to add new knowledge to my own Fecal Management Degree.....this is so informative thank you.....

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  43. Great information. As gross as the pictures might be, they are very helpful guide. Thank you!

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  44. Excellent info as always. I saw some poop that is listed as normal that I recognized.

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  45. Your blog was exactly what I was looking for. But, none of the examples matched what one of my chickens leaves. Instead of larger clumps with the white caps, she leaves small droppings about 1/4 inch in diameter and about an inch long. There is the white coating, though. It looks totally different than the others. Have you seen poop like this and is it a problem? Thanks.

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  46. This was a great post and makes me want to get a microscope and start doing fecal floats at home. Sounds like fun

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  47. "Eberly Barns has cute chicken coops!" Since you said we could post on any one I chose this one since it's my favorite & I promise I won't even mention the chocolate cake! OOOPSS..... I guess I just did :-/

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  48. TheChickenChick11/5/12, 8:23 PM

    Shelly!!!!!!! LOL

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  49. Super useful post - thank you.

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  50. Extremely useful post - thank you.

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  51. YOU'RE WONDERFUL, KATHY, FOR CARING AND LETTING US KNOW WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN OUR BABIES. DON'T KNOW WHAT WE WOULD DO WITHOUT YOU! YOU ARE A BLESSING TO SOOOO MANY PEOPLE. 

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  52. thank you for the pics.  how often do you recommend cleaning a coop? i am new to this and have 23 chickens and 2 coops. is there maybe a bettersystem? i have hay. what about litter? what about cleaning the chicken yard of poop when its been so cold and wet out? i want my chickens to stay healthy.

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  53. i love the info here. thank you so much. i learn so much from you! I have some questions though. i want my chickens to stay healthy (i am new to this) and have 23 chickens and 2 coops. we use hay, but i am wondering what you find to be the best system for keeping it clean. i have seen some use litter in the chicken yard, and i wonder should i try something too. its getting quite muddy with this weather lately and poop. they have enough room but it isn't dry enough out to help the situation. should i be concerned for their yard's cleanliness? what can i do for them?

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  54. TheChickenChick12/19/12, 12:31 AM

    Hi Melissa! I highly recommend sand in the coops and in the runs instead of straw. Here's more on that subject: http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/09/chicken-coop-bedding-sand-litter.html

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  55. TheChickenChick12/19/12, 12:32 AM

    Thank you Kathy. ♥

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  56. again, thank you. i read the whole thing! i will surely look into the sand option. i would hate to be responsible for their bad health. they seem to have the sniffles, and i'm thinking it may be from the hay! time for a change.

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  57. TheChickenChick12/19/12, 10:22 PM

    Thanks Chris!

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  58. Yes. I needed this. Stomach lining had me thinking woms!

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  59. Shannon Swan2/26/13, 7:32 PM

    Help!
    http://www.backyardchickens.com/t/748599/please-help#post_10565572

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  60. Thank you for the information it helps alot to know what to look for 

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  61. Thanks for sharing. Can't recall seeing such a thorough review anywhere. I'm bookmarking this page for future reference!

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  62. Thank you so much! I've know that you can tell a chickens health by reading their poop. Until now, I just did not understand that language. 

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  63. This makes me woozy, but I am strangely grateful for the experience.

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  64. This was fascinating! I have a 6 week old chicken that is consistantly leaving loose (cecal poop?). She isn't acting sick but I'm not sure why the frequent loose poop? Anyone else have any experience with this?

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  65. This was so helpful to me. I saw my first cecal poop and it scared the lights out of me but now I know what it was. You have an exact picture. Thank You SO Much.

    Lisa J

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  66. Thanks Kathy, I guarantee that this will help a lot of people, and their hens, I too will be bookmarking this treasure

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  67. Kinda gross but very helpful & good to know!

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  68. Thank you for sharing. Good info to have.

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  69. very interesting and informative, thank-you. Questions... How do you know who did what? What do you give , and how do you give for worms? And on a different subject, My rooster (Anthony DeNoseo) has a very long and pointed spike about 3" I am worried he might hurt the hens, is there something I can do about it?

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  70. THANK YOU for this post! This morning during my normal coop cleaning of last nights poop fest - I noticed that two of the piles had round worms as pictured above. What do I do to treat this? Also, I read somewhere else that while the birds are being treated not to eat their eggs. Is that correct? Thank you for your help! This is my first year at keeping backyard chickens and boy, have I learned more than I ever thought I would or could about chickens!

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  71. I use either Ivermectin or Corid, both of which are available in any feed store.

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  72. If you find worms from one, they will all need to be treated.

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  73. Thanks! You're a great help! I appreciate all that you do!

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  74. Very informative! Thanks for your effort in putting this one together.

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  75. Gwen Stiegelmeyer7/29/13, 5:01 PM

    Thanks so much for sharing this info! If not for you I wouldn't have known that one of my girls has worms. Now I can treat the whole flock and take care of the problem before it gets worse.

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  76. TheChickenChick7/29/13, 9:38 PM

    I'm happy to know that, Gwen. Thanks for sharing!

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  77. very informative thanks. one of my birds has blood in its poo. not sure witch one. kinda worried. do you know how often they loose intestinal lining? If you could I thank you in advance.

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  78. How do you treat hens with worms, one of my hens has tiny looking white worms in her poop but eats and drinks and plays just like the other ones, doesn't seem to be a problem but I don't want it to become one, what do I do ? No vet around here but there is a TSC that sells medicines for poultry, what ones ?Thanks

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  79. I have 2 chickens. They are approx 3 months. We let them run free on the farm during the day and in their adventures they feast on grasshoppers and a very large array of insects. Every morning I also throw out grain and chick start to add to their diet. They are parasite free but, their fecal matter seems a bit off. It appears as a teaspoon of water with looks like pellets in it. I do not feed my chickens any pellets of any kind so I am concerned. Any ideas on causes?

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  80. Vic's Chicks8/21/13, 12:12 AM

    Yikes - kinda gagged me to look at but very grateful for the knowledge. This was a very thorough and excellent bit of info!

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  81. Vic's Chicks8/21/13, 12:13 AM

    One more thing......the worms - what to do about those if I were to find them in the poo?

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  82. We all talk poop when we have kids, dogs and now chickens glad to hear it so as to keep them all healthy and happy. Thank you

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  83. Monica Mccann Songer8/30/13, 7:16 PM

    what would black watery stool indicate?

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  84. George Ong'era9/5/13, 4:16 PM

    Hi Kathy, please help me with one question. Is the cecal poop sticky and when or how often to expect it?

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  85. TheChickenChick9/6/13, 12:40 AM

    Chickens can be expected to produce an average of 6-7 cecal droppings per day.

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  86. ElevenChicks9/17/13, 11:55 AM

    Hi!
    How can you differentiate cecal from diarrhea (2nd abnormal photo)?? I do not want to unnecessarily medicate my chickens.
    Great, great post, it is very helpful.
    Thanks!

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  87. Thanks for the great resources here! I lost my first hen yesterday and found a lot of your posts extremely helpful in caring and checking on the health of the rest of the flock.

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  88. I just read this last night and then today I found a poop that definitely looked suspicious so I'm running around like "the crazy chicken lady" behind each of them waiting for them to poop so I can check it out! They were all good! Thank you for this information! I never would have known otherwise.

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  89. Someone - maybe more than one - has loose droppings. There are no other symptoms. The 4 hens are active, and laying. I do think my two older hens (March 2012) are preparing to molt - does it start around the vent? Could this cause loose droppings?

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  90. justamesngr10/8/13, 2:20 PM

    I watch poop like a hawk! I had to catch my little rooster last week and hose his butt off because he was all poopy there, had to cut into his feathers to get it all. His poop looks fine now, he's a Bantam and doesn't eat much of the food. The 2 girls eat Layena Plus Omegas and are molting...got some Manna Pro Harvest Delight to give them also. Since it's feed the wild birds time, the chickens are hanging out under the bird feeders for their food too! My birds won't eat much people food, tomatoes & apples seem to be it. I also crush their shells and feed those to them.

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  91. Got me some pretty ladies that are doing great! But winter is upon us here in NE WYO. Im in full swing of canning and with all this scrap veggie leftovers wanted to give them a nice winter pick me up. What are your feelings on this: I have taken all my scraps- veggie guts from cucs, zuchs, toms, melons and peels from beets,carrots, zuch, cuc, and some pears that didnt make into jars and put it all in processor to a pulp. Froze this dark purple pulp to later thaw and give to hens to help with the long winter blues when fresh greens are not so readily available. Will this be ok for their digestion and overall health? Is there any ingredient that I shouldnt have used in this concoction? Thanks for your input!!

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  92. Recently installed a droppings board. Was working beautifully. I have been sick and the droppings board was not cleaned for about 4 days. Went out today and noticed what looked like fly maggots in the droppings. So...cleaned the droppings board well and the sand flooring below it very well. Are fly maggots in chicken poop normal (it's been raining so the interior of the hen house is humid - not wet but the poop hasn't had time to dry out like normal. I don't worm the girls and I just would like to know what my next step would be...I thought I would at least check out their poop tomorrow morning and see what that has.

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  93. Its funny how interested we all are in poop ;)

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  94. Oh good lord I hope I never find worms, I'll probably faint.... Ewwww! Thank you for all of your amazing information, it's wonderful =)

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  95. Elizabeth Flippo10/29/13, 8:09 PM

    Thank u for the valuable info...so much appreciated once again :)

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  96. Thank you so much Cathy...I have had my questions about this!

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  97. TheChickenChick11/27/13, 8:00 PM

    You're welcome!

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  98. Ann Marie Wallace12/10/13, 10:59 AM

    Gross but thank you

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  99. Renee Sturgis12/10/13, 11:15 AM

    Thank you for that. We ate always watching and checking but I'm often not exactly sure what I am seeing.

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  100. April Hutchins12/10/13, 12:03 PM

    Awesome! Thanks, I just learned so much! Happy Christmas Season!

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  101. Laura Adrian Smith12/10/13, 1:35 PM

    Thank you for this information! My droppings board looks normal each morning, but three of my chickens (two Black Austrolorps and a Rhode Island Red) always have poopy butts. Basically, they have a poop trail down their butt feathers. I noticed that in photos, yours don't. Do you do anything to keep your chicken butts clean? I may start keeping an eye on mine a little more carefully, maybe they have some watery poops during the day?

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  102. Pamela Seitz12/10/13, 2:58 PM

    I found this to be very helpful and interesting. Thank you.

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  103. This is obviously not pictures I'd choose to look at over other options, but I was really wondering about some of the "presents" in my girls' coop. Thank you so much!:)

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  104. TheChickenChick12/10/13, 6:52 PM

    Thanks Pamela!

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  105. TheChickenChick12/10/13, 7:25 PM

    Nothing special. If their vent feathers are habitually dirty, there may be an issue with diarrhea. Try some probiotics and a bath.

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  106. thanks for the heads up or the scoop on the poop.

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  107. Wooh, that was tough to stomach, but thank you for the very informative post! My question is- how do you manage to keep track of which bird's poop and eggs are which, and how much food & water each are consuming without spending all day in the coop? Thank you!

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  108. I've got a 1yr old easter egger who hasn't laid any eggs in about 3mos...my vet doesn't treat chickens. She eats, drinks and behaves normally. Just finished molting but nothing out of the ordinary going on. Any thing for me to do but wait?

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  109. TheChickenChick12/12/13, 7:58 AM

    Correct.

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  110. TheChickenChick12/12/13, 8:00 AM

    You just have to observe them when you can.

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  111. On my vet's advice, I just had my Chicken Drumstick humanely euthanized today. She was so swollen due to renal failure and even had fluid starting to building up in her lungs. It was the right thing to do as she was suffering. :(

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  112. TheChickenChick12/18/13, 8:01 PM

    Very sad. I'm so sorry. :(

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  113. It blows, but at least she is not in pain anymore.

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  114. BlueSkies3051/19/14, 9:44 AM

    Thanks for this great article. I'm more at ease recognizing good from bad now.

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  115. Schelli Nimz1/19/14, 9:27 PM

    Very informative, and thank you! If you would have asked me 2 years ago if I would be intensely interested in an article on chicken poo, I would have given you some funny looks. Now I am putting it on Pinterest for future reference..my how things change!

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  116. TheChickenChick1/21/14, 2:05 AM

    LOL! Pinning the poop article, nice!! :)

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  117. Thank you for sharing!

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  118. Great info and pictures!

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  119. Mz_Phelyshia2/25/14, 3:22 PM

    Very informative post....thank you

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  120. Frantic Chicken Owner3/6/14, 11:05 PM

    I just brought home some baby Silkies, probably only 2 days old and one has watery droppings with just white watery stuff mixed in the droppings. She already passed like 8 or 9 of this type of excrement. Is she ill? She chirps strongly, but doesn't seem to be eating much. Wing are a lil droopy. Other chicks have normal droppings. I'm worried about her. Please help.

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  121. Cloudwatcher3/10/14, 8:16 PM

    Yucky but a "must know" to be able to take care of a flock of girls! Thanks!

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  122. great to know and what to look out for.

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  123. Dawn Bitsky Indpendent Represe3/29/14, 5:41 PM

    This article is definitely Pin-worthy! All's good now, but need to save for future reference- thank you!

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  124. Tracy Garrison Christensen3/29/14, 5:54 PM

    Great article!

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  125. Thanks. Now I know what is not normal. I'm getting some broody poop.

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  126. Thank you for all the great things you post. Very informative, and now I am at rest knowing my girls are all healthy poopers!

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  127. Ashley Sexton3/30/14, 11:19 PM

    So I should stop talking about Chicken poop around the water cooler???

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  128. TheChickenChick4/1/14, 12:24 AM

    Lol! Thanks Dawn. :)

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  129. TheChickenChick4/1/14, 12:24 AM

    Thanks Tracy!

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  130. What can I do with all the poo?!

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  131. Raven Robedeau4/11/14, 12:48 PM

    Didn't see the poop I was looking for. My lady is pooping green and runny. Like the abnormal yellow, but not as foamy and army green. Any thoughts??? Please help :)

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  132. Kathy, first of all, thank you so much for all the wonderful information! I am a newcomerto having hens. I purchased a 4 month old americana who seems to have a pinkish blood mixed in with her poops. Her poops are slightly liquidity. Any advice? Unfortunately none of the coop pictures that you posted matched up with mine :-(

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  133. TheChickenChick4/16/14, 12:28 AM

    I always suggest having samples of questionable droppings tested by a vet. It's inexpensive and can save your chickens unnecessary treatment.

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  134. This morning I noticed one of my chickens has runny yellow diarrhea, doesn't seem like herself, is is not joining the rest of the flock. From this post my understanding is this could be a sign of intestinal parasites? What would you recommend treating it with and is it safe for the two chicks with the flock?

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  135. TheChickenChick4/17/14, 5:10 PM

    I recommend bringing a sample to a vet for a fecal float test to see if there are internal parasites to be concerned about.

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  136. TheChickenChick4/17/14, 6:36 PM

    I would not recommend any treatment. I recommend getting a sample to a vet for a fecal floatation test to see whether the hen needs any treatment at all.

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  137. Thank you for this, it's exactly what I needed!

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