Jan 8, 2012

How a Hen Makes an Egg & Egg Oddities.

How a Hen Makes an Egg & Egg Oddities at The-Chicken-Chick.com
Egg irregularities are common. Backyard chicken-keepers need not worry unnecessarily about the occasional strange-looking egg. Take a picture of it, discuss it at the water cooler next day and get a good chuckle out of it. They happen fairly often and the vast majority of the time they do not indicate any cause for alarm.  In order to understand why irregular eggs occur, it’s important to understand how a hen’s reproductive system is supposed to work when firing on all cylinders.
Various egg colors, brown, blue, white
Here's the deal with a hen's reproductive system: a female chick's ovary contains all of the ova it will ever have when it's hatched. The ovary begins to convert ova to egg yolks when she is mature. With the right lighting conditions exists, hormones stimulate ova to develop into yolks. Yolks are released from the ovary into the oviduct when they reach the right size and travel down the oviduct to acquire their whites, membranes, shell and shell color, if any. An egg requires approximately 25 hours to complete the addition of the egg white, the shell membranes, and the shell. Soon after an egg is laid, the process starts again.
Illustration of a hen's reproductive system from the University of Kentucky
*A hen's reproductive system consists of an ovary and oviduct 
(a long tube with several parts that have different jobs)
Actual reproductive system of a hen at necropsy
This is an actual hen's reproductive tract*. I have labeled the functions that occur at different junctures along the way edited to add: if fertilization is to occur, it happens in the infundibulum,  which is the area immediately to the right of the ovary (the black line is running through it). The infundibulum is a muscle that essentiallly engulfs the ovum when it is released. The sperm waits in the infundibulum and has a narrow, 15-18 minute window of opportunity to fertilize the ova.
Anatomy of an egg, chalza, air space, shell membrane, albumen, white, yolk, vitellus
*Anatomy of an egg.

INFERTILE EGG
A hen must mate with a rooster in order for her egg to contain both the male and female genetic material necessary to create an embryo inside the egg. An infertile egg does not contain the rooster's genetic material, which means a chick can never hatch from that egg.  Every egg contains a concentration of cells containing the hen's genetic material on the yolk. These cells are termed the blastodisk and they look like an irregularly shaped, white circle.
Infertile egg identified by a blastodisc of irregular shape
When an egg is fertilized by a rooster, the blastodisk becomes known as the blastoderm, which is the first stage of embryo development. The blastodisk contains the genetic material from both the hen and the rooster. The blastoderm is also known as the germinal disc. When incubated under specific temperatures and humidity levels for 21 days, these cells will develop into a chick. The blastoderm is characterized by its bullseye appearance of regular, concentric circles.
Fertile egg identified by the blastoderm or germinal disc with regularly shaped, concentric circles, a bullseye appearance
EGG IRREGULARITIES
DOUBLE YOLKS
Commonly occur in new layers when the yolk release is mistimed and two yolks travel down the oviduct together. Some hens are genetically predisposed to laying double-yolked eggs. 
Stange eggs: double yolked eggs, multiple yolked egg
Strange eggs explained: multiple yolks
This double yolked egg was laid by my Easter Egger, Esther.

Can a double yolk egg hatch? Yes, but it's rare. While extraordinarily uncommon, miraculously it can happen, watch twins hatched here!
 The following video shows twin embryos inside an eggshell during candling.
Reasons for huge chicken egg.
This double yolked egg weighed 90 grams. Yow.
Triple-yolked egg
Triple yolker. Yikes.
NO YOLK
Tiny eggs containing no yolk are referred to as rooster eggs, wind eggs, dwarf eggs, rooster eggs or fart eggs (I don't make this stuff up, folks.). These eggs are common in new layers when the reproductive system isn’t quite synchronized yet. They can also occur in older layers when a piece of tissue from the reproductive tract breaks free and tricks the hen’s reproductive system into treating the tissue like a yolk, creating an egg out of it. A little piece of tissue is visible in this photo:
Egg without a yolk, explained. Wind egg. Fart egg. Rooster egg.
Egg with no yolk, see tissue fragment at 3 o'clock in this picture.
Chicken wind egg, fart egg, rooster egg, explained
Wind egg in comparison to a white egg from my bantam Silver Spangled Hamburg.

NO SHELL or THIN SHELL
I call soft-shelled eggs rubber eggs because the membrane is soft and pliable. Commonly produced by new layers, caused by stress, an immature shell gland, a nutritional deficiency or a glitch in the uterus, aka: shell gland. To find them occasionally is no cause for concern, to find them regularly can indicate a calcium, phosphorous or vitamin D deficiency. High temperatures can also cause thin-shelled eggs due the hen's decreased ability to store calcium in hot weather.
Soft-shelled chicken egg explained
Rubber egg, water balloon egg, egg without a shell
These soft-shelled eggs feel like water balloons. This egg was the first laid by my Easter Egger, Lucy.
Rubber egg from a pullet new to egg-laying. Soft-shelled egg.
This was Lucy's second attempt. I found it in the run. It must have come as a surprise to her.
Her eggs normalized after the first two. 
How a Hen Makes an Egg & Egg Oddities. Basket of colored eggs
ODD SHELL SHAPE or TEXTURE
(Includes too large, too small, flat-sided, 'body-checked' eggs) I affectionately refer to these as 'mutant eggs.' In new layers, an immature shell gland can cause odd shell shape and is most often of no concern. In senior layers, oddly shaped eggs can result from stress or, if they are a regular occurrence, a defective shell gland. Misshapen eggs can also be caused by infectious bronchitis or egg drop syndrome, both of which are cause for concern.

Shells with wrinkles or ‘checks’ in the shell are known as ‘body check’ eggs. These eggs have been damaged while in the shell gland from stress or pressure put upon them. The cracks in these eggs are repaired in the shell gland, resulting in checks or wrinkles.
Chicken egg with odd, rough, unusual shell texture, explained
Rough shelled or Pimpled Eggs
Egg shells can have different textures causes by a range of things from excess calcium intake (pimpled eggs) to double-ovulation, disease, defective shell gland or rapid changes in lighting conditions (sandpaper eggs). As long as these types of eggs are found infrequently, there is no cause for concern.
Chicken egg with rough shell pimples explained
Flat Side
Can occur in new layers due to stress or disease. The egg is kept too long in the shell gland, resulting in a flat side with wrinkles. Can also occur when a mis-timed, second egg proceeds down the oviduct, bumping into and resting alongside the first egg.
Weird chicken egg- flat sided egg shell explained
Pimples may be caused by excess calcium intake.
You know how delicious those oyster shells can be!
Funky eggshell from chicken explained.
Flat egg.
Large Eggs
Eggs of unusually large size ordinarily contain double yolks and the hen's reproductive system accommodates for the anomaly by working overtime to generate these monstrosities. On average, an extra large egg weighs 64 grams and a jumbo egg weighs 71 grams. The two largest eggs I've ever had were 90 and 95 grams.
Super large eggs from chickens explained
How a Hen Makes an Egg & Egg Oddities: Gigantic eggs
This egg weighed 95 grams. The Marans eggs next to it were big eggs compared to the average egg.
Enormous chicken eggs explained
This is the 95 gram egg next to an average Ameraucana egg.
EGG-WITHIN-AN-EGG
This situation occurs when an egg that is almost ready to be laid reverses engines into the reproductive tract, meeting up with another egg-in-progress. It gets another layer of white/albumen and a new layer of shell before being laid. The cause is not known. While the literature characterizes this egg-within-an-egg phenomenon as "rare," my sense is that it is significantly more common than previously believed. Many backyard chicken-keepers report discovering eggs-within-eggs from their hens.
Chicken egg within an egg, egg inside an egg explained
Chicken egg within another egg
Chicken egg inside another egg
BLOOD SPOT
A blood spot inside an egg can occur either as a result of a blood vessel breaking in the ovary when the yolk is being released or in the oviduct as the yolk travels through it. Blood spots may occur in older hens that have a genetic predisposition to them, in hens that have a vitamin A deficiency, or randomly in any egg.
Cause of blood spot in egg yolk explained
Both a spot and a blastoderm are visible on this fertile egg.

MEAT SPOT
As opposed to blood spots, which occur on the surface of an egg yolk, meat spots are found in the egg white (albumen). Meat spots are the result of a small piece of the oviduct sloughing off as egg white is being added in the egg-making process. Meat spots can be removed with the tip of a knife and while visually unappealing, would be safe to eat.
Cause of meat spot inside a chicken egg
SHELL COLORING
All egg shells start out as white eggs. Colored eggs have their pigment added to the shell at the end of the shell formation process in the uterus, which is also referred to as the shell gland.
Chicken eggshell colors explained Blue, brown, green, white eggs
Brown eggshells contain the pigment protoporphyrin, ( a by-product of hemoglobin) which is found only on the surface of the shell. Brown pigment is applied during the formation of the last layer of the egg, the bloom or cuticle. The brown pigment can be rubbed off easily and does not color the inside of the shell.
Brown chicken eggs- color explained
Brown eggshells from chickens
Brown eggs from chickens are white inside
Blue eggshells are produced by the pigment oocyanin, (a by-product of bile formation). The color is applied early in the shell's formation and penetrates the entire shell. The blue coloring cannot be rubbed off.
Blue chicken eggshells are blue inside and out.
Blue eggs from chickens cause explained
Green eggshells are a combination of blue and brown pigment being applied to the eggshell in the shell gland. The blue is added first and penetrates the entire egg while the brown pigment is laid on the surface of the eggshell.
Olive green chicken eggs eggshells explained
Chicken eggs- olive green eggshells are brown plus blue and are white inside
White eggshells have no pigment at all.

Uneven shell coloring results from the uneven distribution of pigment as the egg passes through the oviduct. Sometimes an egg is stalled for a time in the uterus, which allows more time for pigment to be applied.
Uneven eggshell color in chicken eggs
Blue chicken egg with uneven pigmentation explained
How a Hen Makes an Egg & Egg Oddities: Uneven shell color
This egg was laid by my neighbor's hen during a heatwave. The temperatures were over 100 degrees most of the week, which is uncommon where we live. The stress of the heat is the likely cause of this unusual & spectacular coloring.
Spotted  chicken eggshell color, uneven pigmentation
Spots on this brown egg appear purple due to the uneven distribution of brown pigment.
Uneven chicken eggshell color green egg
This camouflage egg was laid in the heat of the summer by my Easter Egger, Esther, who generally lays an khaki colored egg. 
Eggshell color unevenly distribution of pigment
This egg was laid by one of my Blue Splash Marans.
The colored flecks could be rubbed off very easily.
spotted chicken egg
This spotted egg was laid by one of my Easter Eggers.
speckled chicken eggshell explained
This egg was laid by one of my Olive Eggers.
The preceding information is provided as a general guideline to understanding some egg irregularities and some of the more common causes of them. It is not intended as an exhaustive review of the subject. If you have some concern that your hen may be ill or if she consistently produces irregular eggs, you should consult an avian vet or perform in-depth research based upon your individual circumstances.
Whatever you are, be a good one. Good eggs.
disclaimer disclosure the-chicken-chick.com
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®
*Anatomical illustrations and photo reproduced for educational purposes, courtesy of  Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore and Austin Cantor, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. Copyright 2011. Educational programs of Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, M. Scott Smith, Director, Land Grant Programs, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Lexington,and Kentucky State University, Frankfort. Copyright 2011 for materials developed by University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension. This publication may be reproduced in portions or its entirety for educational and nonprofit purposes only. Permitted users shall give credit to the author(s) and include this copyright notice. Publications are also available on the World Wide Web at www.ca.uky.edu. Issued 02-2011

924 comments :

  1. I like this very informational. I am now a new follower of your's

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  2. @Hibiscus House: Thanks very much, nice to have you join me! If you're on Facebook, stop by and like my page, we have a lot of fun there!
    http://www.facebook.com/Egg.Carton.Labels.by.ADozenGirlz

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  3. So glad I found you tonight! We are having such fun with our little "pullets turned layers"! They are faithful and almost always produce their 8 eggs every day! Will look you up on Facebook!

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    1. Thanks, nice to have been found! See you on Facebook!

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  4. One of my young girls (a Buff Orpington) has been squatting regularly since January 1. I can't wait to see what her first egg will look like!

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  5. @ozarkhomesteader: YES! The submissive squat has been spotted!! In my experience the first egg generally follows within a week of that behavior, so get your egg basket ready and keep your camera handy! So exciting!!

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  6. @Anonymous: Wow, those are some serious egg-layers you've got over there! What breed are they? I've got to get some of them!
    I'll look for you on Facebook, say hello when you join us!

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  7. Regular soft shelled eggs can also be due to an infection in the shell gland that must be treated with antibiotics. Providing extra calcium will not help where an infection is the cause. If you are getting frequent soft shelled eggs from a bird that previously laid normal eggs, see a vet. Infection can cause rough, sandpapery eggs as well.

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  8. @Rachel: thanks for sharing that. Have you had a hen with an infected uterus? If so, did you find any additional symptoms beyond frequent soft-shelled eggs?
    The sad thing is, most folks either do not have an avian vet nearby or simply cannot afford one. :(

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. I wish I had taken a photograph of the rectangular, very long "egg within an egg" that I encountered at a friend's farm. We didn't know what made it so unusually shaped until she tossed it to the chef who buys her product. He missed, and the shell broke, only to reveal a broken egg yolk on the ground, and a second egg inside the first one.

    We could've gotten a million dollars for it on eBay!

    : D

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  11. @Tanya Butler- I wish you had taken a picture of it too! I'm not so sure how high demand would be for a slightly used, rectangular egg, but it sure would've been interesting to see! lol

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  12. Wow, I always wondered why my silver laced wyandotte laid with blood spots. Every third egg from her you can bank on it. My rock lays mutated eggs, one every two weeks, sometimes a double yolk and sometime it is what seems like triple the amount of white. I found your article informative, will definately look for u on Facebook! Thx. Cass

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  13. i had an egg within an egg the other day...

    photos on my blog:

    http://technodoll6.blogspot.com/

    if you want to borrow the pic for your blog just let me know! :-)

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    1. Totally fascinating!! I would love to share it in my blog, thank you for the offer!

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  14. Great read. Thanks for posting. My girls lay brown eggs however I lost one the other day. (something got her when they were out for the afternoon) the next day several were white. I think it could have been stress. Do you agree?

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    1. BullFrog Springs: I'm so sorry to hear of your loss. That's always hard.

      I think it's absolutely possible, even probable, that the stress caused some changes in the oviduct. It's a wonder they laid any eggs at all after that traumatic event. I hope everyone is back to business as usual before long.

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  15. crochetforewe1/20/12, 9:19 AM

    I'm from facebook and have seen you on the BYC too! This is great. I saw some new pictures of chicken anatomy I've never seen before.Very interesting how the egg is made! Thanks!
    Have a blessed day!
    Adrianna

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  16. Replies
    1. Thanks for checking-in mysticgmekeepr. I'm trying to figure out whether you live in CT or have a sixth sense...?

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  17. I went to make dessert the other night, and cracked open an egg, never in my world would I have imagined this, but there was a forming chick! I mean no feathers or any thing, but the heart eyes and other organs... BLECH!!

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    1. Holy YUCK! Someone was obviously sitting on that egg for a few days before it got collected. That's just about every egg seller's worst nightmare. GAAAH!

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  18. Thanks for this very interesting and helpful article. New to raising chickens and I learned a lot.

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    1. Hi and thank you! I'm glad you found it helpful. If you're on Facebook, please stop by and like my page and introduce yourself. We talk chickens over there and I'm sure you'll pick up all sorts of neat stuff by osmosis. :)

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  19. I liked this article. Never heard of an egg inside an egg. Strange.

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  20. Really great and informative article. Love your page, have been a fan for a while. Funnny, I have only ever gotten one double yolk, but my neighbor who buys eggs from us gets a lot of double yolked eggs.

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    1. Thanks Alexis! Maybe you sell most of the double-yolkers so you never get a chance to see them?

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  21. Jennifer Colt Mead1/20/12, 4:11 PM

    Hi, I found your blog via your facebook page-great articles! My SLW tends to lay freckled eggs, and my EE sometimes does too. Oddest thing to me though is that if I scrub off the freckles on the EE's egg (like when I was using them to make ornaments) not only do the freckles scrub off, but the egg goes from greenish to more of a blue!

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    1. Cool, Jennifer! That's because an Easter Egger is a cross between a blue egg layer and a brown egg layer. The blue coloring permeates the egg shell while the brown is 'painted on' essentially, so the brown pigmentation can be rubbed off but the blue can't. Neat, huh?
      Thanks for joining me on my blog! :)

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  22. This post was really interesting- Thanks so much for sharing

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  23. Love your site! This blog was very imformative as I have had chickens for many years and have had a lot of these odd eggs. Now I know why they happen.
    Going to save this great imfo!
    Thanks! Debbie

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    1. Thanks Debbie! I'm glad you're joining us for the adventures!

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  24. Are the double yolk eggs still edible? I wouldn't eat most of these but have come across a double yolk and because I wasn't sure what caused it...I trashed it. Curious on your opinion for some of the others as well.

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    1. Thanks for your question. The double yolked eggs are absolutely edible! In fact, all of the eggs mentioned above are edible. The imperfections are simply structural, not nutritional.

      The only types of eggs that are not edible are ones that are laid after the hen has taken certain medications (eg: a dewormer) or that has worms actually in it, which is extremely uncommon and frankly, if you find an egg with worms in it, that hen is so ill that there are far bigger things to worry about than whether breakfast is served.

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  25. Thanks for putting this all together, I have been wondering why my duck, DUCK, lays a soft shell egg about once every 3 weeks or so. She gets plenty of calcium. And I have to go snail hunting for her too.

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    1. You hunt for snails for your duck!? That's quite a service!

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  26. This is so informative - thank you so much!

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  27. Wonderful! This answered a lot of questions for me! I have had the blood spot quite a bit, but I don't know which of my hens it is from. I also have a regular double yolker. I don't know which one she is either

    I think I have a clue though! ;)

    Thanks again! Candice

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    1. I'm happy to hear it answered some questions you had, Candice. Thanks for letting me know, I appreciate it. :)

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  28. Thanks for all the info...I grew up with chickens and have seen all of this except the egg within the egg...that was interesting...I love learning new things and you really went all out on this post...again thank you.

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    1. My pleasure, Penny. Thank you for acknowledging how much work I put into it. I appreciate that.

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  29. I'm glad I'm not the chicken that laid a 95 gram egg!!! EEEKKSSSS!!!

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    1. I'm with you! Can you believe I still have NO idea who was responsible for it. I'd have sent her to a spa for the rest of the week if she'd have just said something! LOL

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  30. I love your blog - when one of my buff's laid some eggs that were wonky looking, I checked here first! I remembered that you had posted something about those oddities and sure enough!

    I do sell the excess eggs - I would sure hate to waste the fruit of their labors, and I would LOVE to have some custom made labels to add that extra bit of polish to the finished product!!

    Great job - love the info!

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    1. Congratulations merrymelinda, you have won a set of custom egg carton labels!

      Please contact me with your mailing address and for more information about ordering at: service@CustomEggCartonLabels.com

      Delete
  31. I would love to win a custom egg carton label because my 6 year old is the reason we have chickens and she has learned so much from them and we are now selling our eggs to a few people. She would LOVE to see her picture on her very own egg cartons! *Fingers crossed*

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  32. We're just starting to sell to some friends regularly, but we're still having a surplus of eggs. I would love some cute labels to put on our cartons!

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  33. Great info! :) I never realized how many issues regarding eggs until I got my hens...lol. I took it all for granted wheeling my shopping cart around at the store. As for the labels...I had purchased clear 6 egg cartons and really need to dress them up and share with my neighbors...the girls worked hard to lay those eggs at least I can display them better. :-)

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    Replies
    1. This old chickie finally figured out how to post on the blog...YAY!!!

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  34. I would like to win custom labels because I feel like my eggs are a work of art and the labels are too!

    Jennifer

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  35. Corie Umbaugh4/21/12, 6:37 PM

    I would love to win custom labels to use when sharing eggs with friends and family! Makes it easy to brag about my girls good work!

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    1. That's why I started making my labels in the first place, Corie. I wanted a unique way to showcase my hens to the people I shared their eggs with.

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  36. Just got 35 peeps, barn kit is coming in, should have eggs by September. Would love labels to use on saved cartons as gifts for the friends who are making this all possible. -- Veronica Elm, North Mountain, WV

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    1. That's really nice, Veronica. By September everyone should be all set on eggs!

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  37. Loretta Forman4/21/12, 6:41 PM

    i would love to win some egg carton lables so my girls have another reason for a photo shoot LOL! and when we sell eggs to friends and family it might help remind them to bring the carton back ;)

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    1. As IF you need a reason for the photo shoot, Loretta! LOL

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  38. I just started selling my eggs and would love to have personal labels! We are doing very well with egg laying this spring, the girls are working overtime!
    Susan =D
    susancravatt@yahoo.com

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  39. I would like to win custom labels because...our foam egg cartons could use a little "glamour" and your labels are way prettier than the ones I did myself!!!
    Great article, by the way!
    Eli

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  40. I would love some labels because you make all of them so pretty :} Pick me!!!

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  41. christine l.4/21/12, 6:53 PM

    I would love to win a set of egg carton labels! While my hens lay beautiful eggs to begin with, I think a label with their picture will let people know that they are well loved and cared for. I also think it will help them to remember to bring the carton back too :)

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    1. Christine, I put photos of my hens on the label not only to brag about how beautiful they are but to remind people where those eggs came from. My customers are diligent about recycling or returning their cartons.

      Delete
  42. I would love to win a set of custom labels. I would love to feature my "girls" on the front of the egg cartons. Thank you for all the giveaways you offer. Misty Blanks Candia from Facebook

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  43. I would love some labels for when my chickens finally lay their first eggs

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    Replies
    1. I hope it's soon! The wait feels like forever, I remember it well. :)

      Delete
  44. As a farm educator, I LOVE your blog ~ it is amazing how misunderstood is the biology of chickens! As a backyard farmer ~ we have finally refined our egg production enough that we can feed our family of 4 along with my sister's family of nine that live next door and still have enough to sell about ten dozen a week...Good labels would be good!

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    1. Thanks so much, Rabbittfarm, that means a lot to me.

      That's a lot of eggs per week, how many hens do you have?!

      Delete
  45. I would love to win a set of your custom label! Not only are they beautifully done they show how much pride you take in your flock and eggs. Who doesn't want to see a pretty label on that carton before opening to see those wonderful eggs. I feel these labels give our eggs that extra edge when it comes time to sell or give them away! Wendy Hathcock

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    1. Many of my customers have told me that they are able to fetch a premium price for their eggs due to the presentation with custom labels and I find that to be true where I sell my eggs as well.

      Delete
  46. Christina Mitchell4/21/12, 7:43 PM

    My girls are VERY special (read here: very SPOILED!) They each have their own unique personalities and quirks. "Louie" (my daughters pet) knocks on the glass door of our kitchen to come in for breakfast with us. (she's partial to the organic version of Cheerios). We'd LOVE to win custom labels! We're big believers in recycling egg cartons but it would be nice ot REALLY show our customers how special our eggs are. <3 Our hens are LOVED and our customers know it and enjoy these eggs so much that they practically wrestle over the last few cartons!
    Thanks. :) Chris and Mary-Claire.

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  47. I would love to win a set of your custom labels. I have turned so many people at my day job into "real egg" lovers and would love to have a label worthy of the eggs I am selling. BTW, I read you blog every time I get notification of a new one! You have great information.
    Thanks
    Joann O'leary

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    Replies
    1. Good for you to have shown the folks at work the light, Joann! And thanks for following my blog! Good luck!!

      Delete
  48. robin mcdowell4/21/12, 7:55 PM

    I always enjoy your articles. My daughter sells our eggs to our family and neighbors to help her out with chicken feed and her 4H chickens.We don't get a huge amount each day 8 when they all lay that day. Most of the time it's 6 a day. We have one that lays a double yolk at least once a week. Thank you for sharing all of your wonderful blogs with so much wonderful information. :)

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    1. I can't wait until my daughters are old enough to participate in 4H too, Robin. What a fantastic opportunity for them.

      I appreciate you following my blog, thank you!

      Delete
  49. robin mcdowell4/21/12, 8:00 PM

    We would like or should I say love to have some of your custom egg carton labels so everyone my daughter sells her eggs to knows they are wholesome,hormone and steriod free eggs and are cage free chickens. Yes we have a coop but never cage and they free range during the day making the eggs taste even so much better.

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    1. Thanks for participating in this giveaway, Robin and good luck!

      Delete
  50. I think it would be neat to win some custom labels so I could see well they would go over at the farm swap.
    <3 this page - lots of great info so I shared with a few friends :)

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  51. I would like to win some custom labels BECAUSE my chickens lay eggs that are just too beautiful for any ol' box (and label). <3

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  52. I would love a set of custum lables BECAUSE.... They are made by you! LOL I have been meening to order a set form you guys, because the designs are sooooo cute! I work up in the Newborn Nursery at the hospital and I bring eggs in for the ladys all the time! Thay love the free range taste! I just used recycled egg cartons and I think a lable with Kays Backyard Farm with the little doodles you use would be precious!~ Brandi

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    1. Thanks so much, Brandi. Lucky ladies at the hospital!

      Delete
  53. Hey My name is Spencer Knight and I would LOVE to win the egg cartons so i can have something to remember this page not like i am ever going to forget it any time soon.

    ReplyDelete
  54. I WANT THOSE LABELS! Beautiful, serene, quirky, girly, a little bit country.

    ReplyDelete
  55. Love this post! I would love to win the labels since I am just starting to sell my eggs.

    ReplyDelete
  56. This blog was well worth the read. The next time I see an egg with a problem I know where to look. Thank you for all of your information. Egg Carton Labels by you would be a wonderful addition to my cartons, just as your support has been wonderful when I had problems with one of my girls. I just may be having such good success because of your interest in all of our coops. Thank you for being here for us. Bootsie from Happy Hallow

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  57. I've been making homemade labels for Harry's Hens for over a year. They are a big hit here in Kmoxville. Each carton has a hand-tied red ribbon. Your beautiful labels would be the perfect finishing touch!!!

    Thank you!
    Sharon
    sharon00415@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good for Harry and his hens, Sharon! :)
      Thank you for your entry and good luck!

      Delete
  58. Martha Waugh4/21/12, 11:49 PM

    Glad I re-read your post. Got a rough ended egg today. Now I need to figure out who laid it from the 4 eggs I collected today. I would love to win your adorable labels. They will make a great finishing touch for my egg hostess gifts.

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  59. I would like egg carton labels because I am proud of my new venture and want to share it with all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good for you, Judi and thanks for participating!

      Delete
  60. Very informative, especially for a new chicken owner. Now I'll know not to panic if I see any of these strange shapes/colors/sizes.

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  61. i learned a lot this is interesting ive always wanted to have chickens i may get some

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    Replies
    1. I hope you are able to get chickens, they are a joy!

      Delete
  62. vert stanley4/25/12, 9:22 PM

    funny story-my bantam hen has been sitting on some eggs since last week for the very first time. a couple of days ago she was out in the run and i THOUGHT i saw her lay a VERY weird egg....until further inspection revealed it wasn't an egg, but a huge poop! lol my buddy told me they will do that, but i hadn't seen it before!

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    Replies
    1. Nothing in the world as stinky as broody poop, Vert. LOL

      Delete
  63. I have experienced some of these oddies and now I understand how they happen. Good blog as always, Thanks Kathy.
    Ilean Roberts-Hardy down Texas way....:>)

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  64. Wow! Fascinating photos and information. I had never seen or read about some of it. talynw@hotmail.com

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  65. I love reading your blog! I have sent so many people here when I don't know the answer to a chicken question.

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  66. I love reading about chickens, I'd LOVE the Chicken Addict decal
    I'm CHICKEN OBSESSED!!!! LOL!!!!!!
    I collect eveything chikens!!!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Ovene Sloan4/25/12, 9:31 PM

    I have 2 California White Hens. And 1 lays a brown egg and the other lays a white egg. And when I read up on them. They are supposed to be white eggs. Im confussed about this. I just got into chickens last year. I started off with 10 now I have 15. Then I bought 8 more. I didnt think I would enjoy them as much as I do. And I dont like eating eggs.

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  68. Thanks for the info! It was not only informative but gave us a chuckle as well! Can't wait for our first fart egg!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Congratulations Heidi! You have won a CHICKEN ADDICT vinyl, window decal!
      Please email me at service@CustomEggCartonLabels.com with your address and 'Addict decal' in the subject line.
      Let me know when you get a rooster egg, they're not that common. :)

      Delete
  69. Awesome awesome blog...thank you so much. I truely enjoyed reading this and look forward to more. Your blogs have become a "go to" for me when I have questions about my guys and gals! Thanks again and keep up the great work...really!!!

    ReplyDelete
  70. My name is Skeeter and I am a chicken addict! I love your blog and your posts on facebook, I also follow you on pinterest, you have some very informative posts on all of them.
    Thanks for all that you do for the chicken community!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. forgot to include my email skeeter@up.net

      Delete
  71. Great Info thanks for sharing
    Jeanine

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  72. Hi have some of my own oddities if I could find what disk they are on. I have enjoyed reading your articles. I have commented on this one some time ago hope that is ok. Lynncrone@msn.com

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  73. Nicolle Deaves nicocoa@optusnet.com.au4/25/12, 9:55 PM

    Thankyou so much, I have enjoyed reading this blog. I find different eggs interesting and haven't seen most of what you have shown here! The very first misshapen egg I got from a new layer I was worried something was wrong, but after a few she got them right. I kept those misshapen ones and blew them out and took them along with other shapes/sized/coloured eggs to show the children at my Daughter's Kinder and Son's school class and did a little information session with our current tame baby chick and ducklings. I was suprised how many children didn't even know where eggs came from!
    I am a follower of yours already on facebook. Thankyou for sharing :)

    ReplyDelete
  74. Mandy Talbert4/25/12, 10:11 PM

    Super glad to have taken the time to read this blog. I am a frequent follower on FB. The kids and I were sitting here, watching in amazement as the little twin chicks were helped out of their shells. Was that one of your videos? If so, how are they doing? Thanks for the info and keep 'em comin'! <3

    ReplyDelete
  75. crystal short4/25/12, 10:26 PM

    This is a great article of egg production and very informative. I have been raising chickens for 6 years now and every day is a blessing with them! cremm9@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
  76. Kaylin McLeod4/25/12, 10:31 PM

    I'm still waiting for my eggception! That would be amazing! :)
    Back when our layers were new, we would be getting at least one double yolker a day. I don't know if they were all from the same hen, but I felt bad for them! I got a wind egg once and tried hard boiling it. I was surprised when there was no yolk!
    I'm also waiting for my first blue egg, but I'll have to wait a few more months ;)

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  77. I have seen a few blood spots in my girls' eggs. Should I feed something extra for a Vitamin A deficiency?

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  78. Mine are all chicks, but it's nice to know what to look for, just in case! Veronica Elm

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  79. Wow Thank u so much for sharing this information..Love your facebook page! i hope one day i get a chance to win your goodies! ;)

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  80. this was very informative...thank you!!!! We get a lot of double yorkers!!!

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  81. We spent this weekend building nesting boxes for our first chickens....thank you for all the information! Maritta yokomocha@yahoo.com

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  82. Wow---I learned a lot from this blog. Thank You so much!!
    Julie

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  83. thanks so much! So full of great info! My chicks should start laying by October. Can't wait!

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  84. Thanks again for all the info, enjoy all your blogs, contest and all the other fun stuff....holla from Alabama! LOL

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  85. Thank you very much for all the information and illustrations! I really enjoyed them and they were a great way to explain egg making to my daughter, Maddy, 4 yo. She really likes your green eggs! Allison Weinsteiger trinityhh@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  86. Celestina Sellers5/10/12, 7:13 PM

    thank you for this article. I will be using it for my homeschool science class next week.

    celestina.sellers@cox.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Celestina, Congratulations! You have won the vinyl window decal!
      I will email you for your address. :)

      Delete
  87. i love reading these articles since we will be getting 8 silver laced wyandottes next friday....first timers....every little bit of info helps
    elisembaslow@hotmail.com

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  88. I have over the years seen a lot. thank you for commenting and explaining things so well. lynncrone@msn.com

    ReplyDelete
  89. Very informative. I am going to send that to my family members. LOL
    StarryEyzz@aol.com

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  90. It still amazes me how quickly an egg is formed & how (usually) perfect they are!

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  91. Learn something new everyday! :) pacificbug@gmail.com

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  92. Good info. I like knowing the 'why?' and 'how?' of things. Thank you for posting. :)

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  93. robin mcdowell5/10/12, 7:25 PM

    I have never had a no yolk egg, not yet anyway but I have had a few that looked like the egg was twisting on it's way out. The shell looked that way. I have a white egg layer that every so often her eggs look lke a yellow color.

    ReplyDelete
  94. Denise Demick Case5/10/12, 7:26 PM

    FABULOUS INFORMATION KATHY! I had the egg in the egg one!! Thanks for sharing!!

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  95. awsome. I would love to use this at our next chicken club meeting great information

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  96. I really enjoy this information, I have shared it with my husband and we've referred back to it several times. It's good info and well "layed" out. hehe Thank you for sharing stuff like this!!

    ReplyDelete
  97. Tammi Moore5/10/12, 9:41 PM

    LOVE this page. I have come here a few times to figure out why a couple eggs have been odd. Hope I win cause I have 24 VERY spoiled chickens. treatsandtreasures@rocketmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  98. You are awesome. I absolutely love ask the great info. Thank you so much. Keep up the great work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That was supposed to say all not ask sorry.

      Delete
  99. Thank you for the wonderful information! Love your blog..... and I love learning more about my chickens. Thank you!

    Elisha

    heath_elisha@earthlink.net

    ReplyDelete
  100. Gina Brown6/7/12, 8:09 AM

    Can't wait be looking for fertile eggs in the future! :)

    ReplyDelete
  101. Very informative post. I love when my Red Sex Link lays purple spotted eggs, and now I know why.
    I must say that I have experienced most of these eggs, I so miss the double yolkers that I got from Twinkle, my Red Star, as well as her companionship.
    Unless I get to move into the country, I won't be getting any fertile eggs. =(
    Luckily, I haven't had any 'pimple' eggs or 'flat' eggs. But, I'm sure its just a matter of time.

    ReplyDelete
  102. Thanks for all the useful information. My girls aren't laying yet, but I'll be ready when they do!

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  103. thanks for the great information, as always...

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  104. Christine L.6/7/12, 9:21 AM

    Thank you for the informative post! I have a hen that was laying me a double yolker every other day for almost 2 weeks! She also seems to lay wrinkled eggs and eggs with a raised area around the middle of the egg. Still haven't found why she lays wrinkled eggs all the time.


    clayne317@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  105. Esther Widgren6/7/12, 10:28 AM

    Now I know what to expect when my chickies start laying!
    Thanks for a great overview :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Esther, congratulations, you have won a 'GOT EGGS' tee shirt!! Thank you for participating in the GRIT Magazine Giveaway!

      Delete
  106. I'm not in the position to have chickens yet, but I loved this article! I'm going to save it so I can refer to it when I finally start raising chickens. I had never seen most of the oddities you showed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hadn't either until I started keeping chickens, Erica! Here's hoping your chicken adventure can begin sooner rather than later. :)

      Delete
  107. I was proudly quoting an answer to a question from my husband. I had learned the information on your blog. He just looked at me and said what you are in school for chickens now? How did you know that? LOL! Thanks for all your help!

    Terri
    totribet@comcast.net

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  108. great info.. Thanks Cheri Kaelin

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  109. New to chickens and this blog helps me know what to look for. Thanks! Also liked you page on fb and it contains such good info too!

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  110. staci wells mefford6/21/12, 10:58 AM

    darling book!
    max,kayla,cowboy and princess leia

    ReplyDelete
  111. Christine L.6/21/12, 11:00 AM

    Oh wow. My son would LOVE to have this book! He is such a book lover and chickens and dogs!? Thanks!!

    (clayne317@gmail.com)

    ReplyDelete
  112. We don't have a dog, but we have nine chickens. Warbeak is the leader of the flock.

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  113. We don't have a dog, but we have 9 chickens. Warbeak is their leader.

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  114. I keep coming back to this page whenever I come across an odd egg! Thanks for all the info :)

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  115. Great info!! We dont have any eggs yet, but this was very informative!! We have 4 dogs and 20 chickens!

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  116. Ive read this blog about 4 times but each time i miss something because when i come back to read it i am like, wow i didnt know that..very good info on all of your blogs.

    Jaime Heilman

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  117. Thank you so much for the photos! We have 3 dogs (Dody, Bindhi and Bodhi) and about 30 silkie chickens. I have 42 mixed eggs in the bator, too!!

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  118. Thank you so much for the photos! We have 3 dogs (Dody, Bindhi and Bodhi) and about 30 silkie chickens. I have 42 mixed eggs in the bator, too!!

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  119. We have our dog Mac - he was a rescue. We have our chicken - the one who looks the most like that one is Nellie.

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  120. We have one dog (Harley) but she's not an outside, with-the-chickens god. We've got 40 chickens, and the lead rooster we named The Chairman. Not sure how much longer he'll last. He likes to be the king, but we don't necessarily want him to be king. But they have to share the farm with 10 ducks and 4 geese.

    ReplyDelete
  121. I've had just about all of these eggs except an egg within an egg... oh, and an olive egg. :( Years ago I wondered why the inside of my blue egg shell was blue, but the brown eggs were white. Now I know, thanks Chicken Chick!
    We have 4 beagles named Blue, Bug, Trixie, & Duffy. It looks like a great book for a 'Nana' to share...

    ReplyDelete
  122. My dogs names are Baxter, Layla, Toby, Roxie and Sanchez (the chihuahua!)

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  123. I've had all of these eggs except an egg within an egg... oh, and a green one. :( My biggest egg was 121.9 grams! Years ago I wondered why the inside of my blue egg shells were blue, but the brown ones were white. Thanks to you, I now know!
    We have 4 beagles named Blue, Bug, Trixie & Duffy. This looks like a cute book for a 'Nana' to share with the little ones!

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  124. This book would be great for my granddaughter Lilly. She could read it to her favorite chicken and dog friends, Helena and Remmy.

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  125. We have 4 dogs and 14 chickens..... that's a lot of names :)

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  126. we have 4 dogs and 14 chickens. That's a lot of names :)

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  127. stacywagers6/21/12, 1:27 PM

    We have our ever so sweet and hard beagle Rossi who watched over our flock of about 15 chickens..ones name is marbles..my 5 year old son just both lives our chickens and reading books..thanx for this chance to win a great book..:)

    ReplyDelete
  128. I too love to teach about the eggs in my realm. When people buy an egg which is not grocery store smooth and even in color they have been concerned on occasion. It is nice to have your excellent compilation of all these egg-amples to direct them to.

    Working a separate job caring for oral health issues full time and coming to to care for 10 acres, with beef cattle, wool goats, and a flock of domestic and exotic fowl can be challenging. It is nice to have a relaxing site to let my brain cool down.

    Let me know if you ever find a "Hen's Tooth" As a Moon Lighting Tooth Fairy I am always on the lookout.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Princess Sally TF, I'll be on the lookout! :)

      Delete

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