Oct 3, 2011

EGG BLOWING 101 & Egg Decorating instructions

How to blow out egg shells and decorate them
10/3/11
Christmas Egg Tree
You just collected your first egg and it’s spectacular. You're not really going to bash its shell on the counter, are you? ~gasp!~  Eggshells can be preserved for years of enjoyment by blowing out the contents and cleaning them. Looking for a fun craft project that makes a great gift? Decorate them for the holidays!
How to blow out egg shells by a variety of methods
Blown eggs, decorated for display
A blown, decorated egg on my Christmas Egg Tree.
Nativity scene using blown eggs. DIY instructions here.

Egg blowing is not difficult, it just takes a little patience and practice. I don't recommend practicing on a special or favorite egg as beginning attempts tend to result in breakage. The three basic steps to blowing an egg are: 1. Put hole(s) in egg, 2, Empty contents 3. Clean inside of egg.   Using room temperature eggs makes emptying the egg much easier than with a cold egg.

STEP 1 MAKE HOLE(s) IN EGG
To blow an egg's contents out of the shell, two holes are ordinarily required, one in the narrow end and one on the wide end (where the air cell is located). For beginners, marking the desired hole location on the egg with a pencil is helpful.  There are many ways to get a hole in an egg. I have tried push pins, thumb tacks, the Blas-fix® egg blower tool and a Dremel drillI do not recommend push pins, tacks or paper clips- they make jagged holes that often cause the shell to crack and the holes are so small that they make blowing difficult. The little tool that comes with the Blas-fix® egg blower was my preferred method until I was clued into the Dremel. It is far and away the best method I have used, hands down.  The Dremel makes cleaner, more uniform holes much more quickly than other methods. 
Blas-fix egg blower to empty egg shells
The Blas-fix egg blower tool. The Blas-fix tool works by twisting the tool back and forth, 
filing tiny bits of shell away and requires only one hole in the egg to empty it
blown eggs with uniform hole created with Dremel tool
Nice, uniform hole that won't crack the egg.
Dremel tool for drilling holes for egg blowing and decorating.
This is the Dremel attachment I use.
Two holes are needed when blowing eggs with lung power or an aspirator. 
Chicken eggs for blowing and decorating
STEP 2- EMPTY CONTENTS
Lung power, Blas-fix® or Aspirator

 After drilling holes, the yolk should then be broken by inserting a toothpick, open paperclip or a large gauge needle into the holes and carefully stirring so as not to enlarge the hole or chip the shell.

If you hoped for a video at this juncture, I'm sorry to disappoint; egg blowing with lung power is simply not a spectator sport.  On second thought...when someone else is doing the blowing, it's pretty funny. My step-daughter graciously "volunteered" to demonstrate the technique. ☺
After the yolk is scrambled, air is blown into one hole with pursed lips sealed around the hole. Cheeks should remain inflated like a trumpet player's to maintain steady pressure. Chalza (the white stringy anchors inside the egg) may clog the hole, but can be dislodged by pulling gently with a piece of paper towel. Oh yes, this process is glamorous.


If using the Blas-fix, insert needle into hole and pump air in with the bellows. Ideally, the egg should stream out the hole, but it doesn't always work. The bellows wear out very quickly, eventually cracking, resulting in a lack of sufficient pressure to get the egg out of the shell. It works great initially, but doesn't last long enough to blow more than a dozen eggs. Lung power or an aspirator are more efficient and reliable than the Blas-fix.

If using an aspirator, the open end is inserted over the hole and air squeezed in, forcing the egg contents out the other hole.
STEP 3- CLEAN INSIDE OF EGG
Submerge eggshells in a bowl full of water and partially fill shell with water. Cover both ends of the egg with thumb and forefinger, shake, then blown water out. This step should be repeated until water runs clear. 
I dry the eggs in the microwave to ensure sanitation, heating 12 second intervals, four to six times.
Cleaning and drying eggshells for decorating blown eggs
DECORATING BLOWN EGGS
How to blow, clean and dry egg shells
Now that the eggs are empty and clean, it's time to decorate them.
DIY Egg Ornaments via The Chicken Chick®
 I made a Christmas Egg Tree and an Easter Egg tree last year. 
Dying the Easter eggs can be done the same way as with hard-cooked eggs.
Easter Egg tree made with blown, colored eggs
My Easter Egg tree, April 2011.
Blown and decorated egg
I use rub-ons or stickers from my local craft store or online.They're easy to use and look pretty.
Rub on stickers or self-adhesive stickers for decorating blown eggs
Stickers on blown egg shells
These are eggs with stickers before finishing with decoupage.
Modge Podge decoupage for finishing blown egg shells
I use Modge Podge to seal my eggs after embellishing them. 
Just paint it on in a thin, even coat and let it dry. It adds some strength to the shell.
Decorated egg with decoupage to seal on top of shell and rub-on sticker
This is a rub-on that has decoupage over the top.

I seal the holes in my blown eggs with bead caps and super glue gel.
Bead caps are inexpensive and available at craft stores and online.
bead caps seal the holes of the blown eggs decoratively
bead caps finish off blown, decorated eggs simply and elegantly
The bead caps finish off the egg simply and elegantly.

To hang my blown eggs, I use either bead caps with ribbon , elastic cord or, my preferred method: ornament caps. After I have foraged through last year's ornament box for orphaned ornament tops and exhausted that supply, I buy miniature ornaments inexpensively and pirate them for use on my decorated eggs. No glue is necessary as the pressure from the little wires keeps them in place.
Christmas ornament caps can be inserted in the holes on the end of blown, decorated eggs
elastic cording can be used to hang blown, decorated eggshells
Elastic cord,  ribbon or a wire ornament hanger can be used for hanging.
Here are some of my favorite creations.
Marbelized eggs made form blown eggs
These marbleized blown eggs are super simple and fun to make. DIY instructions here.
Blown egg topiary DIY instructions
DIY instructions for this egg topiary with blown eggs can be found on my blog here.
blown, decorated eggs turned into Christmas tree ornaments
blown, decorated eggs adorn Christmas tree
DIY Christmas wreath using blown eggs and homemade cinnamon ornaments
My Christmas egg wreath with cinnamon ornaments.
blown, decorated egg
EGG BLOWING 101 & Egg Decorating instructions
Disclaimer, The Chicken Chick®
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

91 comments :

  1. GREAT IDEA ! I was thinking of doing the same , thanks for sharing :)

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  2. Thanks Noreen! Let me know how yours turn out. In fact, if you're on Facebook, come on over and 'like' my page and then post pictures of your work! http://www.facebook.com/Egg.Carton.Labels.by.ADozenGirlz

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  3. Those are beautiful!!

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    1. Yes, I agree, although I am still very young, I like this and I read everything while holding one of my perfect eggs.

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  4. Thanks for sharing...I am anxiously awaiting my egg blower in the mail. I hope to make the decorating a family affair. (BYCer In His Service)

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  5. Thanks for the info. I have a bunch of blown goose eggs so maybe I will finally get the gumption to decorate. I used a drill bit with a dremel tool to make the holes and used a turkey baster to blow them. I cut a hole in the top of a big yogurt container to rest the egg on and used a rubber o ring for a better seal on the baster. You are quite right it is not a spectator event.

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  6. Thanks for sharing. I really think they are beautiful. Nice job. I decoupaged mine using an old chicken calendar cut in triangle pieces then decorated with rinestones etc. I beaded the hangers in co-ordinated colors Works great. Lots of fun

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  7. Would freezing and thawing the egg first disrupt the integrity of the egg contents enough to make the blowing easier?

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  8. @Patti: I'm not sure as I've never tried that. But I think I would worry that the shell would crack with the temperature changes. Frankly, I don't think it would even be worth the effort.

    The eggs aren't that difficult to empty out, you just need some practice. And it really does help to have them at room temperature.

    The chalza is what creates the challenge more than anything else. What I do when there is significant resistance in emptying the egg is grab onto the it with a paper towel and pull until it dislodges from the hole.

    It's simple enough to break up the yolk inside the egg, so that's not the challenge.
    When the egg is partly emptied, I'll re-stir the egg's contents with a toothpick or the needle from the Blas-fix and then SHAKE it.

    It sounds more complicated than it is. Let me know if you try it and any tricks you may find that help.

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  9. @Anonymous: I would LOVE to see pictures of your chicken calendar egg! If you're on Facebook, please come on over and share on my wall! http://www.Facebook.com/Egg.Carton.Labels.by.ADozenGirlz

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  10. So beautiful. I saw your post on BYC and I voted and will each day. Your eggs. . .you should really sell these! I love the last one with the little Christmas Chick. Adorable!!

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  11. Thank you so much, Kelly! I appreciate that. :)

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  12. absolutely clever, what a way to show the love for our chickens and for their hard work of popping out an egg almost daily.

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  13. Thank you Ruth! I couldn't agree more. The least I could do for them this holiday season was celebrate them with their own Egg Tree!

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  14. It's too late for this year, but it's definitely something I want to try in the future. Would make wonderful unique gifts. Especially for those folks who think we are nuts for having chickens!
    Thanks and enjoy the holidays. Paula

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    1. Paula, it's never too late to start this project. In fact, I ran out of time this year and the selection of eggs wasn't as great in the fall and winter as it was in the spring due to molting and decreased sunlight. I've got a stash now for when I'm in the mood to work on this project again later in the year!

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  15. Very informative and just what I needed to know. Thanks
    Fb page - ourlittlemeadow

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    1. Glad it helped, Mike! What will you be doing with your blown eggs?

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  16. One of your final steps is to microwave the empty shells to dry them, I am wondering if the eggs could be dried in a conventional oven?

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    1. I can't think of a reason they could not be. A low heat setting is probably best. I'm sure they could also be allowed to air-dry, but I'm not patient enough for that. :)

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    2. Careful baking eggshells as they become brittle. I bake my eggshells after to give to my chickens for the extra calcium as my grandfather taught me (something his mother taught him). When they are baking you can hear them snapping, even when they are cooling. Sounds like rice crispies.

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  17. A must try!!! Thanks for sharing :*)

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  18. thanks for the inspiration! cant wait to get started, so far quite a few are blown out. (the hard way) haha. feel like I blew up balloons!

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    1. Let me know how they turn out for you! Feel free to share pictures on my Facebook page!

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  19. Wow about 35 years ago we did this. We made Christmas and Easter ornaments and sold them. Had forgotten all about it. we took strands of lights and put them in the decorated eggs. And one of the men in the group etched some of them. We sold them for a fund raiser. Took goose eggs and one of them had a fine saw he cut them and made boxes and picture frames. Wow brings back memories....Lynn Crone

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    1. What a great idea, Lynn. Thanks for sharing that neat memory. :)

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  20. I did this with grocery store eggs when I was a teenager...over 20 years ago...lol It made my mom crazy to have all these egg shells in her kitchen :0) My backyard ladies are finally laying and I can't wait to do this with my 6 kids! It's even better when the eggs come from your own flock!

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  21. I have lots of eggs that have gone by, and this would be a great use for them. I found if they float in water, I can clean them with my Blas-fix, and they didn't even stink! Well, some of the current oldies might be stinky!

    I recently cleaned some of our cookoo moran eggs. These eggs were laid by chickens that had died in the spring, and they were special to my daughter.

    Thanks for the great ideas!

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  22. These look great! How many holes do you drill when you use the dremel?

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  23. I've been crafting with my eggshells for a long time. What fun! I use a syringe that is used for putting butter, etc. under the turkey skin. It only takes one hole in the egg and works great. I make the hole a little larger to fit over the twinkle lights on the Christmas tree and it lights up the eggshells so very pretty! But I keep them up high on the tree because the dogs decided they wanted to eat my eggshell ornaments. Silly dogs!

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  24. Wow. Thank you so much. I learned a lot of new tricks and garnered many ideas. It has been a long time since I did any egg blowing but the last time I did, I used a bulb syringe (ear syringe) and forced air into the egg from the syringe instead of blowing into the egg. (I've tried blowing into the egg and it didn't work well!) Thanks also for the tip to scramble the egg first. Makes perfect sense now.

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  25. Wow those are beautiful. Thanks for sharing at repurposed ideas weekly.

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  26. Thanks for this! These will make great gifts and decorations once my girls start laying.

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  27. I used a basket ball pump to blow eggs out and a baloon pump might also work. I also raise chicks that laid different colored eggs. I also decorated them. kathy12119@yahoo.com

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  28. Marlys Folly11/10/12, 11:42 AM

    These are beautiful.. I have never done egg blowing but I might try..Thanks for sharing.  I am going to pin this so that I will have it when I decide to try this.

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  29. TheChickenChick11/10/12, 1:14 PM

    Thank you Marlys. I have been making them for years and really enjoy the process. I think you will too!

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  30. I just blew out the first egg today and my granddaughter was completely grossed out but said,   Do it again Grandma!  LOL.  I used a very sharp tip of a pocket knife to lightly chip away at the top and bottom.  My buff orpingtons have such hard shelled eggs that I knew it wouldn't crumble.  Now off to the craft shop on Monday to pick up the various things for decorating.  Thanks.  http://movingontothepast.blogspot.com/

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  31. if you pour elmers glue into the egg after the cleaning and blow that out, it makes the shell even more stable after it dries
     

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  32. TheChickenChick11/15/12, 5:25 PM

    Really interesting tip, thanks for sharing, Susie!

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  33. I love how many ideas you can have using eggs, wonderful.

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  34. TheChickenChick11/26/12, 6:34 PM

    Thanks Georgia!

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  35. I am glad I was able to find out how to follow your blog, thanks to you.  Now I am going to start trying my hand at egg blowing,  you have some beautiful eggs you have done.  Thanks for giving me the knowledge to use to do it.  Thanks so much jane 

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  36. TheChickenChick11/26/12, 10:34 PM

    I'm happy to have you following along with me, Jane! Enjoy your egg project; do let me know how they turn out!

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  37. This is a wonderful idea i'm going to try some thanks for the ideas.

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  38. My question is about the blowing process.  Do you do anything to sanitize the eggs before putting your lips on them? Chefs are always stressing cleanliness when working with any uncooked chicken products and I wondered if there are any risks to putting your mouth on the eggshell.

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  39. TheChickenChick11/28/12, 3:37 PM

    Hi Sheryl, good question. I don't do anything to sanitize the eggs before blowing them, however, I do ensure that my nest boxes are clean and that we don't blow any dirty eggs. I worry more about germs on public doorknobs than getting sick from egg-blowing.

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  40. Great video!  Thanks for sharing your techniques.  Makes it much easier for folks to understand I think.  

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  41. TheChickenChick11/30/12, 6:51 PM

    Thanks Melissa. I'm a visual learner myself, so I agree with you that it makes the process much easier to understand. I'm just thankful that my step-daughter was willing to play along! LOL

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  42. TheChickenChick11/30/12, 7:12 PM

    My pleasure, Leslie. Let me know how they come out!

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  43. What an incredible process! Beautiful images! Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!!

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  44. DianaRambles2/10/13, 5:33 PM

    Great tutorial! Thanks for sharing this at my Pin Me Linky Party.

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  45. Debi Bolocofsky3/9/13, 10:36 AM

    Great tutorial and I love the way you have decorated them.  Thanks so much for sharing at Wednesday's Adorned From Above Blog Hop. 
    Debi and Charly @ Adorned From Above

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  46. Debi Bolocofsky3/9/13, 12:08 PM

    Thanks so much for sharing at Wednesday's Adorned From Above Blog Hop. 
    Debi and Charly @ Adorned From Above

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  47. TheChickenChick3/12/13, 12:55 AM

    Thank you Debi!

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  48. Oh, I love the idea of blown eggs and decorating them!  Beautiful!  I see lots of egg gifts in my friend and family future! 

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  49. When dying eggs for Ukrainian style pysanky eggs, we dye the eggs and then blow them, so the eggs will sink, not float, in the jars of dye. Also, you don't have to worry about dye getting into the eggs and dribbling out.

    This is the style of one-hole egg blower that I like.  It works well, doesn't have moving parts to wear out, and you don't have to put your mouth on the egg. http://www.bestpysanky.com/One-Hole-Egg-Blower-p/blwr-1.htm

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  50. could you use shelack instead of the decoupage to harden the egg? When I was younger my family made these! They were so much fun and I remember my mom using shelack in a spray can to finish them.

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  51. These are so fun! I'm going to be trying them soon. Thanks for sharing at Homemade Christmas 2013.

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  52. I can't wait to try this. when I was young I made these and it was a lot of fun. thank you for the info.....Sandra in Oklahoma

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  53. K. Armtsrong11/5/13, 9:24 AM

    LOVE THIS! What a great gift idea. Thanks for sharing.

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  54. I can't wait to try this!! I know what everyone is getting from me for Christmas this year.

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  55. Thanks for the great information! I feed my dogs raw eggs most every day and hate to break open some of the pretty shells. Now I won't have to! I can make ornaments out of them! I wish I could paint designs on them, but I'm not artistically talented at all!

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  56. How do you get the mini ornament caps on? Make a larger hole then stick the metal bits in?

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  57. What a wonderful idea! I am in love with this! I can't wait to get started! =D

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  58. Love the blown eggs, never tried it before but I am going to use my extra eggs and make ornaments. I love to make my gifts. Thanks again!

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  59. Christal Rosalee11/5/13, 10:34 AM

    super fantastic!!! what fun...

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  60. I have always wanted to learn to do this, now I can! Thinking about making one for each of my Grandbabies as keepsakes!

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  61. TheChickenChick11/5/13, 7:57 PM

    Have fun with it, Robin!

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  62. Denise Allison Magil11/6/13, 12:53 AM

    nice way cool

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  63. TheChickenChick11/6/13, 11:04 PM

    I'm not artistic either, that's why I used rub-ons or stickers, Mindy! ;)

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  64. Jenn Werner-Williams11/16/13, 3:08 PM

    I love blowing eggs!

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  65. Pam Waltz Ellis11/16/13, 5:01 PM

    Love it! Thank you for sharing.

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  66. Cynthia Garces Deleon11/16/13, 7:42 PM

    Great ideas!!! :) thanks for sharing

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  67. Mandi Armfield11/16/13, 10:22 PM

    Simply amazing, now I know what my holiday project is going to be...now to start saving up the eggs.

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  68. Kristina Nicole Richardson11/16/13, 11:27 PM

    Ive been looking for chicken ornaments i hadn't thought of this!! I will make egg ornaments!!! Thank You!

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  69. Bonnie Henry11/17/13, 7:40 AM

    We are going to make these ! Can't wait..love the wreath with the eggs on it !

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  70. BatonRougeChick11/17/13, 3:27 PM

    Thank you!! I need inexpensive way to make many Christmas gifts, and this is it!!

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  71. Debi Bolocofsky11/26/13, 1:05 AM

    Your eggs are so beautiful. Thanks so much for sharing with Wednesday's Adorned Link Party. Have a great Thanksgiving.

    Debi and Charly @ Adorned From Above

    http://www.adornedfromabove.com

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  72. John Metzer12/9/13, 9:13 AM

    I know half the fun is the blowing :) but if 1) you want to try duck eggs (larger than chicken eggs) or goose eggs (much, much larger than chicken eggs) or 2) you get tired of blowing eggs, then try our blown duck and goose eggs that are ready to decorate.
    http://www.metzerfarms.com/Eggs.cfm?&EggType=Blown
    Great How To blog!
    Enjoy!
    John

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  73. Great tutorial my sweet friend. They are lovely. Thank you so much for helping to make the Thursday Favorite Things blog hop so much fun Hugs!

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  74. P Gale Perry2/24/14, 5:53 PM

    Will large hypodermic syringes and needles from the wholesale veterinary supply work to make the hole and suck or blow out the contents?

    I used to have a Ronco automatic battery operated egg scrambler that made a hole, inserted a flexible wire and wisked the contents. It's back to the internet to find another one!
    Found one; here it is: PS: 99 cents at the dollar store.
    http://www.amazon.com/Clever-Egg-Cracker-Scrambler/dp/B0044TIT4M
    There are VERY HELPFUL instructions for egg blowing tips in the Customer Reviews.
    Invert your egg, pointy end up 24 hours before to center the yolk and drill that end to scramble. (Bend the scrambler wire 30 degrees).

    I like the idea of a hand operated basketball pump, but methinks a single hole and sucking with a large hypodermic syringe will get most of the contents out cleanly. The diagonal cut of the needle will make a clean small hole, and a smaller needle will blow out the remaining contents and be used to rinse the eggshell insides.

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  75. P Gale Perry2/24/14, 6:50 PM

    Will large hypodermic syringes and needles from the wholesale veterinary supply work to make the hole and suck or blow out the contents? I used to have a Ronco inside the egg scrambler that made a hole, inserted a bent needle and wisked the contents. It's back to the internet to find another one!

    I prefer the Ronco version, but a cheap one is available for $.99 cents at the dollar store:
    http://www.amazon.com/Clever-Egg-Cracker-Scrambler/dp/B0044TIT4M
    There are VERY HELPFUL instructions for egg blowing tips in the Customer Reviews.

    Invert your egg, pointy end up 24 hours before and unrefridgerate the carton of eggs to center the yolks and drill that end to scramble. (Bend the scrambler wire 30 degrees).

    I like the idea of a hand operated basketball pump, but methinks a single hole in the pointy end and sucking with a very large hypodermic syringe will get most of the contents out cleanly. The diagonal cut of the needle will make a clean small hole, and a smaller needle will blow out the remaining contents and be used to rinse the eggshell insides.

    A cut off large hypodermic needle or very small drill bit end can be chucked into an electric drill with the tip exposed about 1/4 inch. Whole carton of eggs can be drilled at once. And then a bent wire chucked in the drill is inserted to scramble each egg in the carton without removing any upside down eggs in the cartons! Your Dremel bit has excellent applications.

    Be careful not to implode (colapse) or explode the egg when sucking or blowing out the contents with a large needle. A slightly smaller needle allows air infiltration around the needle and is safer.

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  76. P Gale Perry2/25/14, 12:14 AM

    Robin: You may like this link for scrambling an egg inside the shell without making a hole:
    http://m.instructables.com/id/Scrambled-Eggs-still-in-the-Shell-/step5/Now-what/

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  77. P Gale Perry2/25/14, 12:18 AM

    Sorry, Kathy, I was looking at your reply to Robin and I used the wrong name.

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  78. Tammy Davis5/9/14, 7:39 PM

    Can anyone tell me what I should do about my baby chick welsumers are pecking there eyes,the rooster is not doing it just my pullers;only 2days old.

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  79. just got our first egg today!!!! now to learn this art and keep this wonderful little masterpiece!

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  80. Teri DeFrange7/22/14, 11:21 AM

    Im goona blow my first eggs ----- I CAN NOT WAIT :) Thanks again for the knowledge

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  81. Love this!! Thanks!

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  82. Birdie Barb9/26/14, 4:46 PM

    Thank you Kathy for this article. Our daughters are coming home for Christmas this year, this will be great for us to do as a family!

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