Aug 12, 2011

How to Hardcook & Peel Fresh Eggs EASILY

Ever wonder why store-bought eggs are so easy to peel? Simply put- they're old.
Ever wonder why store-bought eggs are so easy to peel? Simply put- they're old.
Hard cooked, fresh eggs are harder to peel than old eggs, which can be frustrating if you don't know the secret to peeling them easily. And here's a hint: there are no additives required!
Hard cooked, fresh eggs are harder to peel than old eggs, which can be frustrating if you don't know the secret to peeling them easily. And here's a hint: there are no additives required!
Fresh eggs have a higher carbon dioxide level and a smaller air cell than old eggs, which causes the inner membrane to adhere more strongly to the egg white than it does to an old egg.
Basic Egg Anatomy
*Basic Egg anatomy
When the bloom of an egg is compromised by washing or age, it becomes more porous, allowing air into the egg and some of the carbon dioxide in the white to escape. This decreases the acidity of the white, which decreases the ability of the white to cling to the egg's inner membrane.

When eggs age, they also lose moisture through the pores, causing the air space on the wide end of the egg to increase and the white to pull further away from the shell membrane. When the membrane is further from the shell, eggs are easier to peel.

Similar results can be accomplished by letting backyard eggs remain in your refrigerator for a few weeks but then they wouldn't be fresh, would they?

Armed with this information, peeling fresh eggs can be done successfully and with a minimum of muttering under your breath.
Coturnix quail eggs take only 6 minutes to steam to hard-cooked stage.
Coturnix quail eggs take only 6 minutes to steam to hard-cooked stage.

Hard cooked, Fresh Eggs, the STEAM AND ICE METHOD
  • In a covered pot with a steamer basket in it, bring several inches of water to a boil
  • Carefully add the eggs to steamer basket when water is boiling.
  • Turn down heat to simmer, cover and steam for 15 minutes
  • Immediately remove eggs from steamer and place into a bowl of ice water
  • When cool enough to handle, crack and peel.
Immediately after removing steamed eggs from the heat, plunge into an ice bath.
quail egg peels easily after steaming and an ice bath
Here's a twist on tuna using  hard-cooked eggs that results in an interesting, high-protein dish served as a sandwich, on top of a salad, mixed into cold pasta or eaten it as-is.
Here's a twist on tuna using  hard-cooked eggs that results in an interesting, high-protein dish served as a sandwich, on top of a salad, mixed into cold pasta or eaten it as-is.
Tuna Egg Salad Recipe
1 can of tuna fish, drained
2  hardboiled eggs, peeled & chopped
mayo to taste
celery, chopped
fresh parsley, chopped
fresh chives, chopped
salt & pepper to taste
Mix all ingredients thoroughly. Serve on bread for a sandwich, on lettuce for a salad or mix into cold pasta for pasta salad as a main dish or side.

*Anatomical illustrations and photo reproduced for educational purposes, courtesy of  Jacquie Jacob, Tony Pescatore and Austin Cantor, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture. Copyright 2011. Educational programs of Kentucky Cooperative Extension serve all people regardless of race, color, age, sex, religion, disability, or national origin. Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, M. Scott Smith, Director, Land Grant Programs, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Lexington,and Kentucky State University, Frankfort. Copyright 2011 for materials developed by University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension. This publication may be reproduced in portions or its entirety for educational and nonprofit purposes only. Permitted users shall give credit to the author(s) and include this copyright notice. Publications are also available on the World Wide Web at www.ca.uky.edu. Issued 02-2011
 The Chicken Chick is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com
Kathy Shea Mormino, The Chicken Chick®

137 comments :

  1. I wonder how the www.geteggiestv.com work if you're having trouble boiling the fresh ones?

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  2. @Sunny Girl: I bought one of those and am going to find out!

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  3. Another benefit of cooking hard boiled eggs that way (it's same way I do), is that the whole yolk stays yellow and does not get that greenish grayish edge which sometimes will happen.

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  4. How well did the eggie thing work?

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    1. Good question, Corissa. Would you believe I haven't gotten around to trying it yet? It's on my to-do list this week, thanks to you. ;)

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    2. I found the eggies to be a LOT more work than just boiling/peeling the old fashioned way. You have to oil the inside, if the egg yolk is large it won't fit throught the top hole, and cleaning the eggies afterwards was difficult for me.

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  5. I saw the eggies at my local grocery store. Waiting for your report before I 'shellout' for one LOL

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    1. I bout a set of the eggies...They Work great!

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    2. I have a set and it seems like it changes the taste of them to me. Kinda greasy and has a different taste. It might b me though. They seem to be a much work as peeling them. I use the salt water and ice water method and it seems to work well. Thanks for the recipe.

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  6. I have a 1 yr old barred rock rooster to give away. I am in the NW corner of Oregon.Can someone out there use a rooster? jaditesam@aol.com

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    Replies
    1. Gean: You are welcome to email me with a photo and his particulars and I will add him to my adoption photo album on my Facebook page. Please include your contact info in the email as I will add that to the photo caption so folks who are interested can contact you.

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  7. Thanks for this, I have alot of customers ask why they can't peel my farm fresh eggs. Another key is too have the eggs room temprature before placing them in the water, helps A LOT!

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    1. I'd give them a little cheat sheet with the hard cooking instructions on them!

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  8. Thanks for this info. I used this method this year and its wonderful.

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    1. I'm so glad it worked out for you, Elizabeth!

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  9. Thank you so much for the great advice. I didn't realize that the eggs being fresh was my problem. I was upset because I couldn't understand how, after having cooked hard boiled eggs for so long, that I all of a sudden stopped being able to do it correctly. I mean, it isn't rocket science! I thought maybe I kept losing track of time and cooking them too long. This helps so much!

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    1. I'm glad it helped, Kristin! See you on Facebook!

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  10. Thanks for these tips... I am going to share with all my FB friends!

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  11. I always bring the eggs to a hard boil in plain water (no salt)then pretty much do the same as the your salt & ice method from there. That's how my Mom taught me long ago & it always works. My problem has been with the yolk not being covered with enough white, so it's difficult to do deviled eggs & not wanting to use them for pickled eggs.I always put my eggs in the cartons pointy end down. Recently I read to flip them 24hrs. before cooking & it centers the yolk. I did that today & had much better results.

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  12. Thanks for the information. I have had trouble peeling "fresh" boiled eggs. I can't wait to try this! :)

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  13. I had a surprise the other day. I boiled some fresh eggs to devil. As I was peeling them, I noticed there wasnt an "air" about them. (Ok, my kitchen didnt smell like I had sewer problems...lol) My daughter in law had to make some of hers (store bought).  She literally cleared everyone out of the house because of the odor.  I'm finding out new things all the time since I started raising chickens this year. Love it!

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  14. Paul Rector12/4/12, 2:09 PM

    I think the salt in the water, besides raising the boiling point of the water ever so slightly, helps draw water out of the egg by osmosis, giving additional separation between the shell and membrane. The water in the egg will travel out of the egg to try to dilute the salty water outside of the egg to bring the system into equilibrium. It'd be an interesting experiment to soak the eggs in cold salt water for 10 or 15 minutes, then rinse and put them in plain water and do the normal bring to boil, remove heat, wait 15 mins, drain and ice. If you obtain the same separation of egg and membrane, then its the soak in salt water that does the trick. The ice stops the egg from cooking further from residual heat inside the shell.

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  15. Not meaning to be a bummer... but i've tried both of these methods several times and neither have worked for me. I'm still looking for the magic recipe. =]

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  16. TheChickenChick12/4/12, 7:06 PM

    Let me know how the experiment goes, Paul!

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  17. thank you so much for this info. i have switched to farm fress eggs recently and have been VERY frustrated with trying to peel...

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  18. TheChickenChick12/5/12, 10:00 PM

    Let me know how it works out for you! I think you'll be pleasantly surprised. :)

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  19. well, i finally boiled some of my farm fresh eggs again and this time did it the way you suggested. and you are right.. it worked great! thanks so much.

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  20. TheChickenChick12/19/12, 10:25 PM

    Woo-hooo! Happy to hear it Sam!

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  21. I'm absolutely looking forward to my next batch of boiled eggs.  We couldn't figure out what in the world was wrong with our eggs!  Glad to know that there's nothing WRONG with our eggs - they're just fresh - what a great problem to have!  I shared this post on Facebook too so that everyone to whom I've given eggs will know there's a way around this.

    One friend responded that her sister, who also raises backyard chickens, pokes a pin hole in the bottom of each egg prior to boiling & that also keeps the shell from sticking.

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  22. TheChickenChick1/10/13, 9:47 PM

    Let me know how it goes for you, Heather!

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  23. 42oldchickenman992/5/13, 6:19 PM

    I used to raise chickens and sold eggs, many years ago! Ther is nothing I like more than soft boiled eggs and bacon  for breakfast! I have noticed that the farm fresh eggs are harder to shell even though they have only been boiled for 6 min. I'm going to try adding salt to the water, and boiling them harder! Thanks for the info! Lee Winter  New Castle, Pa. 

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  24. springchicken662/5/13, 8:21 PM

    I have tried the  pricking holes in the egg routine and had no success to date. Even have a special `gizmo` my Mother sent me from England. ( I am here in US ) Maybe they have a secret with it that we don`t !!!!!! 

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  25. This method is much easier than any other method, but can still be more frustrating than store bought.  I also have to wonder if there is some other difference between home chicken eggs and store chicken eggs, other than just age.  I have tried letting home chicken eggs age and they were still a nightmare to peel.  I absolutely love my fresh eggs and would not trade them for anything, regardless how hard they are to peel hard boiled or steamed.  =)  I think I am going to try Eggies, LOL.  Most reviews say they are a pain to wash, but I think I might take that over the pain to peel.

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  26. I tried it.  Most eggs peeled very well with minor mishap.  One peeled PERFECTLY.  There was only one that peeled terribly - and that one was peeled by my very impatient 10 year old...he basically smash/rolled it, therefore removing most of the white AND shell...LOL!!!  But I will definitely make them this way again!  Thanks for the wonderful tip!

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  27. Can you help me with a chicken feed recipe? I have about 100 hens in my egg business. I like to make organic feed or organic mash for them.

    Thank you.

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  28. Tina Roeseler7/29/13, 7:43 PM

    I didn't fool with trying it any other way than the one u suggested! It worked fabulously! Thank you! -- Tina Roeseler

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  29. Jill Lauderdale8/8/13, 7:55 AM

    Thank you so much for this tip. Will try it out today. :)

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  30. Just finished this, and my eggs came out so amazing. It is funny what makes me happy these days! <3

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  31. What salt? Why is everyone talking about salt?

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  32. Linda Walker Adams11/27/13, 4:15 PM

    When you place the eggs in the boiling water, should they be completely covered (by the water)? Or partially submerged? Or completely above the water (to steam)? Thanks for posting. Hard cooked fresh eggs have been almost impossible!

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  33. I pierce the shell on the fat end of the egg before putting it into the water and that seems to have solved the peeling problem for me. I haven't tried steaming them, I slow boil for 16 minutes and, of course, ice bath after. :) Hubby wants to get an egg steamer, but all have such mixed reviews - mostly that they can't handle big eggs.

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  34. TheChickenChick11/27/13, 7:55 PM

    I have no idea. There is no need for salt.

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  35. TheChickenChick11/27/13, 8:00 PM

    If boiling them, they should be submerged completely, if steaming them, they should not touch the water.

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  36. TheChickenChick11/27/13, 8:00 PM

    Try your steam/ice method without piercing and see how that goes.

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  37. Tried the steaming, but 3 of them broke open. After ice water, only about half peeled easily. I think I'll stick with piercing. Maybe I'll try the steaming with pierced eggs. My mom didn't peel them right away, she kept them in the shell in the fridge. I remember peeling them at school, we must've always had old eggs!

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  38. Interesting information I didn't even relize I wanted to know. Thanks

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  39. I recently came across a simple fool proof method that works great for me. Start the eggs covered in "cold" water and bring to a simmering boil for 10-12 minutes making sure the water doesn't boil hard and crack the eggs. Drain and cover with cold water and cool for 10 minutes. Roll the egg across the counter gently cracking the shell and it will slide off easily. I was skeptical at first, but it works every time! Now, if I could just figure out the perfect poach. Cheers :)

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  40. luvbngramma!3/10/14, 11:15 PM

    Do you recommend washing the eggs once gathered? Thanks

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  41. Heart Acres Chicks3/24/14, 1:51 PM

    LOL - I could never remember that I had eggs boiling so I bought a Cuisinart egg boiler - pierces the top of the egg and boils them exactly....it was worth it for those of us who get distracted!

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  42. Silvercreek3/24/14, 1:52 PM

    I tried this steam method and it worked pretty well, but another method that I never see discussed on these strings is dropping eggs gently with a spoon into already boiling water, returning to boil, and simmering for 15 minutes. Then into an ice bath.


    Works every time. Last week I boiled eggs I had just collected. They peeled beautifully.

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  43. Lance Piscitelli3/24/14, 1:52 PM

    Salting the water after it starts boiling, allows the water to boil at a slightly higher temperature than 212° that it normally takes water to boil. It also adds flavor to starches.

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  44. I will no doubt be trying this! Thanks!

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  45. I pierce a hole with a push pin in the fat end of the egg, cover with cold water, bring to a boil and shut off. Wait 12 minutes and dump out hot water and cover with cold water and peel.

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  46. Dee Strahle3/24/14, 2:20 PM

    I tried the steam method a while back and was impressed! I only had to discard one of the whites for my deviled eggs due to pitting. An added bonus is no green around the yolk.

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  47. I was just muttering (possibly not so nice words...lol) under my breath this weekend while trying to peel fresh eggs! I should have checked your site first as I wondered if maybe you had info up about peeling fresh eggs. Glad you posted this and glad I read it. It will save me future angry mutterings.

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  48. Cindi Smith3/24/14, 2:30 PM

    I plunge mine into ice cold water (with ice cubes) and still have trouble! But I would rather have trouble than eat store bought eggs any day! :)

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  49. I also just take a bigger needle and pierce a small hole in the big end, then boil. They peel wonderfully.

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  50. Madeleine J. Martin3/24/14, 2:54 PM

    on the egg tuna salad.......add macaroni, peas, chopped onion and canned mushrooms and you have a summer main dish with some tomato slices.......

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  51. I was wondering why it was so difficult to peel my fresh hard-cooked eggs! And yes, there was plenty of muttering, too. I'd tell my friends about it, and they'd look at me with that 'Are you sure you just don't know how to peel an egg?' expression. I was beginning to think I didn't! Now I know better!

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  52. Laura Lopez Dzuray3/24/14, 3:03 PM

    The wealth of information you give is amazing. I can't wait until my littles join the ranks of egg layers to try all the techniques you discuss.

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  53. The Victory Garden had a show about fresh eggs being boiled and they said that if you added 1/2 cup salt to the boiling water with the fresh eggs, they would peel easier. I use this for my fresh eggs but you can taste the salt. Will try the steam method.

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  54. It's funny that being a fully grown woman, at age 50 , I recently had my worst hard boiled egg disaster mightmare come true. late at night I was preparing my famous Salmon Nicoise salad for my daughters baby shower with 30 guests. My 2 hens didn't provide the amount of eggs I would need, so I had splurged and bought the costco free range brown eggs. I boiled up 18 for about 15 min then plunged them into lots of ice water and continued to run cold water on them for good measure. I let them sit , I saved peeling them for last because there's nothing to it right? Wrong !!! these eggs needed to be pretty because they were to be sliced in half the long way and that's all. I spent 45 minutes trying desperately to get a good half egg here and there but to no avail. I questioned every step, maybe I brought them to a biol too slowly, maybe it's the eggs. Until I read this thread I was ashamed that I googled how to boil eggs !! I gathered together another 6 eggs, 3 store bought and 3 fresh from my hens. having read that a fresh egg is harder to peel I wanted to put it to the test. I brought the water to a boil quicker this time and once again plunged them into an ice bath. I still couldn't peel the store bought eggs, but my fresh free range eggs peeled like a dream , hmmm...... whats going on here :/ at 4 in the morning I decided to get a few hours sleep and deal with it before the shower. My wonderful husband ran to the corner market and got some old white eggs (not that color has anything to do with it) which turned out perfect the first time. So ladies, you tell me, what do you think the deal was ???

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  55. Ann Marie Wallace3/24/14, 4:33 PM

    Thanks again for the great info.

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  56. Darcey Byrne3/24/14, 4:54 PM

    I am going to try this.

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  57. Karen Sanders Warner3/24/14, 6:17 PM

    Thank you! Can't wait to try this.

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  58. Grace Murray3/24/14, 6:40 PM

    Guess I need to buy a steamer basket. I have some eggs in the back of the fridge getting old! No need any more!

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  59. Alice Birchfield3/24/14, 7:33 PM

    I will try this. Thanks!

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  60. Sarha Gross3/24/14, 9:06 PM

    Have you ever noticed that brown eggs peel better than white eggs? My brown eggs always peel perfectly but my white ones can be horrible to peel. Haha.

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  61. Grandmamamingo3/24/14, 10:30 PM

    I use baking soda in the water with store bought eggs when boiling them. Has made all the difference. Wonder if this will help with fresh eggs. Going to try steam method. Hate buying store bought for deviled eggs because of the issue of trying to peel fresh.

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  62. The eggies do well; fairly easy to wash, but take some pains to prepare. Also take longer to cook that directions say. I like mine!

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  63. Leslie Wright3/26/14, 9:10 AM

    I discovered this works by using one of the microwave egg steamers. They look like a giant egg and I couldn't believe how easy the eggs peeled after being cooked this way.

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  64. Shelia Walker3/26/14, 11:51 AM

    We had been putting ours in ice water and they still were hard to peel. I tried the steamer basket today and they turned out perfect! No sticking and easy to peel, too! Thanks so much for this info.

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  65. TheChickenChick3/26/14, 10:30 PM

    Awesome! Happy to help. :)

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  66. TheChickenChick3/26/14, 10:41 PM

    Thank you Laura!

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  67. Teresa West4/8/14, 11:59 PM

    Thank you so much for this!!! I have been eating fresh eggs since a child and peeling fresh eggs has been a nightmare! Just finished steaming my first batch and am so impressed with you method! PERFECT EGGS!!! Thanks again!

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  68. TheChickenChick4/9/14, 10:34 AM

    Outstanding!! Happy to hear it, Teresa. :)

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  69. Chicks Gone Wild4/9/14, 5:17 PM

    I'm so excited... gonna be trying my first batch in a few moments. You know, "watched pot" and all. Thanks for the tip! LOVE your blog!

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  70. Andrea Burson Robbins4/13/14, 1:24 PM

    Thank you for the information on steaming eggs! Can't wait to give it a try!!! :)

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  71. Karen Sanders Warner4/13/14, 2:24 PM

    Can't wait to try! Your blog is the bomb!

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  72. If you don't have a steamer, you can also heat the oven to 325, put the eggs in a muffin tin or on the wire rack of the oven and cook them for 30 mins. Then take them out and plunge them into a bowl of ice water until completely cool. Peels perfectly everytime.

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  73. Ruth's Chickens4/13/14, 3:37 PM

    Thanks so much for this info. I will be trying it today!

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  74. Carolyn Vernon4/13/14, 4:19 PM

    Thank you ,thank you, thank you its like a miracle to me not only are they easy to peel they taste better to me not quite as dry as boiled eggs.

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  75. A little salt in the water will do the trick too! Don't have a steamer but sea salt in the boiling water and ten minutes and the eggs come out perfect. No green on the yellow either.

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  76. Tonya Macneil4/13/14, 6:05 PM

    thanks for sharing.

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  77. Kelly DeForest4/13/14, 6:38 PM

    Gotta try this...our ladies turned 1 last week and we have tried everything to get their fresh brown shells to peel easily...thanks for the tips!

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  78. I have trouble peeling OLD eggs, so even though mine are from the store I am going to try it. Hoping, hoping.

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  79. Salena Bonczar4/13/14, 10:49 PM

    I did try this...but I have a question. If you put several inches of water in a pot, you aren't really steaming, since the water pretty much covers the eggs unless you have 7+ in a pot. Do you mean for the basket to just be an easy way of removing the eggs, or should there be water only covering maybe half way up the egg itself and we leave the cover on to steam?

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  80. I'll give it a try! The recipe as well. Thanks for sharing!

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  81. chicken fabgal4/14/14, 12:26 PM

    Thank you for sharing this. I was wondering how I was going to do this, this week. Happy Easter everyone.

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  82. TheChickenChick4/14/14, 3:59 PM

    Thank you for reading!

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  83. TheChickenChick4/14/14, 3:59 PM

    Thank you! Good Luck

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  84. TheChickenChick4/14/14, 4:00 PM

    Thanks for reading! Good Luck!

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  85. TheChickenChick4/14/14, 4:01 PM

    Thank you for reading, Carolyn!

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  86. TheChickenChick4/14/14, 4:02 PM

    Thanks for reading!

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  87. TheChickenChick4/14/14, 4:04 PM

    Thanks for reading!

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  88. TheChickenChick4/14/14, 4:13 PM

    Thanks for reading!

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  89. Tracey Pounds4/14/14, 11:07 PM

    So, hubby asked me, "So how does steaming them make them not stick?" Oh, wise one, do you have a clue how steaming them works? The rest of the information was so thorough and great. Thanks for the blog!

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  90. my eggs are so fresh from the same day of being laid by my girls that it is very hard to peel them. It can be quite frustration. I will try this

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  91. TheChickenChick4/15/14, 1:46 AM

    It's the ice that shocks the membrane away from the shell, not the steam.

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  92. I have four hens, I don't wash their eggs unless necessary, and I don't refrigerate them. I have discovered it's easiest to peel their fresh eggs after a quick cold water splash after boiling, just enough so I can handle them. The shell comes off easily in big pieces and then close in container and put in fridge if not eaten right away. They are nearly impossible to peel and bits of the white come off with the peel once cooled or refrigerated.

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  93. so they can be steamed and/or boiled?

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  94. The Chicken Whisper4/19/14, 10:52 AM

    Do you have to peel right away for easy peeling or can you do it a few hours later?

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  95. Dee Johnson4/27/14, 2:36 AM

    I read that you can 'age' your fresh eggs by letting them sit overnight. I tried it, and it helped a lot. I have also steamed eggs. It helped, but not as much as letting them sit overnight. I think it is supposed to be 1 night left out equals 1 week in fridge. I've also heard baking eggs in the oven, they are supposed to be real easy to peel, but haven't tried it yet. Since washing helps them to be more porous, which helps the membrane to separate from the egg, I will try washing, then letting sit overnight. I always ice them after cooking. Tuna salad sounds great. I always add boiled egg to my tuna. Thanks!

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  96. Jenny Blose4/28/14, 1:43 AM

    My trick for getting fresh eggs to peel easily is to throw about a teaspoon of salt into the water with the eggs and hard boil. Eggs gathered the same day peel effortlessly!

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  97. Lee Ann Lewin4/28/14, 3:48 PM

    Did this today and it works! super awesome! ended up buying white, store eggs (not caged??) and those were awful to peel. But tried the steam method today with Stella eggs (Bantam is setting eggs, not laying) and they peeled so easy and were so pretty. Just last year I learned to make hardboiled minus the grey, stinky around the yolk. now I know the BEST way to make them! Thank you!

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  98. Do you have to peel them right away?

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  99. Anna Orgeron5/17/14, 3:32 PM

    I tried the steam cooking. Did it for 20 minutes. Well, they were only about 2/3 done. I think they needed five minutes more. This very well could be another difference when cooking at high altitude (over 9,000 ft). I'll be trying again soon.

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  100. Linda Powell5/17/14, 11:46 PM

    Lowering eggs, fresh or older, into boiling water is the way I do it thanks to a tip from a neighbor. It truly works every single time.

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  101. Dianne Whaley5/19/14, 12:41 PM

    I like your blog so far, I have to try this new way of boiling fresh eggs. Love egg salad and put eggs in my potato salad. Really dislike peeling them. I'm going to try this new method. Wish me luck...

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  102. Karen Bates5/21/14, 9:12 AM

    I have tried this method and it didn't work.....but there were tips in here that should make it work just great. Getting the pot of water boiling then adding eggs and getting those steamed eggs immediately into the water....should do it! Looking forward to try this when my girls start laying.

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  103. so if its just the ice that does this, then does it really matter if you boil or steam? Its the ice bath that pulled the membrane away right?

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  104. Thanks for the steaming information.... I tried steaming eggs straight from the coup to check this out....prefect hard cooked eggs....shells slid right off...loved it.

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  105. Love the tuna egg recipe! Really needed the hard cooking info. Thanks

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  106. Thanks for the great egg cooking info:) Your site is always so helpful, I don't know what I would do without it:)

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  107. Veronica Johnson-Cavins8/8/14, 11:06 PM

    Love the information,, its great , <3

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  108. I go to your resources for everything I do now, Kathy! It's amazing how much educational material you have!

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  109. Angela LaRose8/27/14, 5:06 PM

    So I guess my question is how to do a fresh egg so it's still a bit runny for breakfast? I find it makes a giant mess to make soft boiled eggs from the previous days eggs round up

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  110. Linda Noble8/27/14, 5:10 PM

    Love these two recipies, thanks!

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  111. What I've found is the age of the egg matters less than the age of the hen, new girl eggs can hardly be peeled, but older hens egg shells slip right off. I will try your method and see what happens. Let me give you a tip, in my restaurant I teach staff to use a table spoon for removing shells when you get good at it you can do dozens in minutes with the shell in 1 piece give it a try you'll be amazed at how easy it is with a little practice. Love your site, plan on looking in on you regularly thanks

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  112. You are the best, Kathy! Love the Tuna Salad recipe!

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  113. My family has always put hardboiled eggs in our tuna. They made it go further during the depression.

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  114. This method works for me but since my large brown eggs always get sold I find myself boiling the smaller eggs for my use. I only boil for 12-13 min.

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  115. Stepehn Sofley8/27/14, 11:39 PM

    You have invested so much of your time to share with us the proper way to keep chickens. The knowledge you have found and shared with us is a wealth of information second to none. Keep up the fight!

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  116. Do you steam them with the lid on or off?

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  117. I've heard of this method before, but what if I want to make medium or soft boiled eggs from fresh eggs and I want them to be hot, how long do I have to steam and will submerging them in ice water make them cold? Or does this method only work for hard boiled eggs? Thank you!

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  118. Not to change the subject but my Big Red Rooster died yesterday. Probably some type of influinza sp?Saved one rooster with antiboitics he's doing ok.

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  119. Amazing will try this...

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  120. is it possible to smoke eggs?

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  121. I'll definitely be trying this technique.

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  122. Eva Hargrave1/22/15, 12:20 AM

    I want to win.

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  123. Others have said it, but I want to affirm: You are a WONDERFUL resource. Thank you so much for sharing your experience with a newbie like me!

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