Apr 26, 2011

Chicken Embryo Development (**Graphic photos**)

Ever wonder what's going on inside the eggs as you wait the LONG 21 days until hatch day? Well, put away your LED flashlight and get out of that dark closet, here's an up-close and totally AMAZING look at chicken embryo development from day 1 to 21. For more information about  embryo development and candling pictures, visit my blog post here.

 




















*Photos by  the Purdue Research Institute.

29 comments :

  1. They're from the Purdue Research Institute. The eggs had to be opened at every stage of development, unfortunately.
    Thanks for the nice comments, would love for you to follow along!

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  2. ChickLover988/17/11, 11:11 AM

    That's really cool! It's sad that they had to open the eggs up, but it's neat to see. :D

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  3. That was a great post!! Thank you! Lol, I've always wondered what it looks like!

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  4. I think that it shows a wonderful God who thought up such a wonderful thing to happen in just 21 days...

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  5. im always amazed at this, look at the big difference in day 19 and 21.

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  6. Better to open a few eggs and make the photos available than to have thousands of people doing the same thing at home. :-) Thank you for posting!

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  7. I think it looks amazing how the development of the chicks . Very cool!

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  8. I'm fascinated by this process every time I see these photos and every time I candle hatching eggs. To think that it takes only 21 days to go from egg to live chick is just mind-boggling!

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  9. I was just telling my husband yesterday how I just love your blogs. I have used your blog on how an egg is formed to show my questioning friends several time. Very Informational! Keep up the good work. Shawn Harkrider

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    1. Aren't you nice? Thank you for saying so. :)

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  10. Loretta Forman2/20/12, 12:23 PM

    this is just awesome! i love these photos! they have helped so much with my curiosity that somes along with hatching eggs!

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  11. Thanks for this, I can look each day and say to myself, "that's what my chicks look like today!" :D

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  12. Last night I found myself reading an article on how to incubate and hatch chicken eggs in the open so they could be viewed (much like what your showing here). I started out 2 eggs about 24 hours ago, and they are matching the photos you have posted. The only difference is, I am not cracking eggs each day just to take some photos. If you read over the website I provided, you will see that you can hatch your eggs within plastic wrap, and watch them develop. As ozarkhomesteader pointed out, everyone wasting eggs to get pictures would be such a waste of good chickens, however if you get the little chick wrapped up in plastic wrap within day 0 to 3 you can get your pictures using just 1 egg. *It also makes a real good open view to show young children the process that happens in the egg while being incubated* which is something I needed with my 4 and 5 year old. Once they seen chickens come out of the eggs, I couldn't beg them to let me crack a chicken egg for breakfast. Without them seeing it from egg yolk to chicken day by day, it is almost impossible to talk them through what is going on inside the egg.

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    1. I am sorry, the link that I added earlier is incorrect, and shows information about the incubation process. The correct link that I was wanting to provide, so that you can watch the chick grow outside the shell, was http://sp.uconn.edu/~mdarre/4-hpoultry/invitro_inset.html

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    2. UCONN is my alma mater. Michael Darre is a very well-known and respected authority.

      BTW: I didn't take these photos, they are from the Purdue Research Institute as noted above.

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    3. I had read that the images were from Purdue Research. I just wanted to let it be known (in case there were some others looking for this same type images) that they could do this same type incubation project at home, and see it first hand, and best of all do it using just 1 egg.

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    4. You're correct, as cited in my blog post above, these images are indeed from the Purdue Research Institute. Brinsea Products includes these photos with many of its incubators for classrooms.

      The information you refer to for doing a similar project at home was written by Profession Michael Darre at the University of Connecticut, my alma mater. Here is the link to his article: http://sp.uconn.edu/~mdarre/4-hpoultry/invitro_inset.html

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  13. I would like to try this myself. At what point do you remove the plastic wrap since the chick does not have to pip and "Hatch" itself?

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    1. This study was done at a University, it is not an experiment I would do myself.

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  14. day 21 was cute

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  15. I would be tempted to try the experiment with the plastic wrap and pipe but i am wondering how many of the embryos made it full term and how do they "Hatch"?

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  16. James Pilrose IV7/8/13, 3:02 PM

    If I ever find any one of the assholes that conducted this study, I'm going to stomp on them until I break their face. Fuck Purdue, forever.

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  17. sofia sana9/7/13, 3:56 AM

    Wow, amazing.
    Nice to visit this blog. Nice to know about your post.
    It’s good to know that theses are fantastic
    These are very informative
    Good to see the chick



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  18. i'll try.................... will it work ? cuz if i'll not work the egg would be wasted !

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  19. i dont if i'll work or not ! because i tried to grow a chick........and then i kept one egg outside in the sunlight.......and then i' been waiting too long till when the egg breaks...............WELL NOTHING HAPPEND !

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  20. Richard M Schmitz1/20/14, 10:14 AM

    Getting eggs from a coworker who has chickens and a rooster, alas, we only have chickens. How will we know if they are fertile to start the incubation process? Is it a crap shoot on telling if any of the eggs are fertile to start with? Is there anything I should tell my coworker to do in collecting the eggs? She is going to give me two dozen so that my daughter can put 12 in an incubator and 12 under one of our chickens (hopefully we have a broody one by the time the eggs arrive) for a science experiment to see how many hatch from each batch. This is our first time trying to hatch eggs - any advice would help!

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  21. This is amazing..I look at these pictures everyday.. I have 3 in my incubator we are on day 6.. and I compare these photos with my eggs to see how they're growing.. thank you Kathy keep up the good work

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  22. Sam Salisbury4/3/14, 7:53 AM

    Great pics, very informative. Thank you for sharing :-). The correct/updated link to the information about doing this at home is at: http://web.uconn.edu/poultry/4-H%20Poultry/invitro_inset.html

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